Gal Shenar
Created November 22, 2016

Worldwide Surf Report

A simple to use alexa experience to be able to access surf reports for any location worldwide. Comes with unique "best" day to surf feature!

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Worldwide Surf Report

Things used in this project

Story

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Schematics

VUI Diagram

A VUI Diagram to show the entire flow of the app

Code

Lambda Code for Surf Report App

JavaScript
'use strict';
var http = require('http');

// --------------- Helpers that build all of the responses -----------------------

function buildSpeechletResponse(title, output, repromptText, shouldEndSession, cardText, imageUrl) {
    return {
        outputSpeech: {
            type: 'PlainText',
            text: output,
        },
        card: {
            type: 'Simple',
            title: title,
            content: cardText ||  output
        },
        reprompt: {
            outputSpeech: {
                type: 'PlainText',
                text: repromptText
            },
        },
        shouldEndSession,
    };
}

function buildResponse(sessionAttributes, speechletResponse) {
    return {
        version: '1.0',
        sessionAttributes,
        response: speechletResponse,
    };
}

function getSurfPhrase() {
    var phrases = ["A bad day surfing is better than a good day working.",
                    "Hang ten, dude",
                    "Get stoked",
                    "If in doubt paddle out",
                    "Sometimes you just have to ride the wave you're given"];
    return phrases[Math.floor((Math.random() * phrases.length))];
}

// Welcome the user to the app and provide some inital instructions;
function getWelcomeResponse(callback) {
    const cardTitle = 'Welcome';
    const speechOutput = "What's up dude. What spot would you like a report for?";
    const repromptText = "Tell me which location you want a report for";
    const shouldEndSession = false;
    callback({}, buildSpeechletResponse(cardTitle, speechOutput, repromptText, shouldEndSession));
}

// Let the user know that their session has ended, and leave them with a nice quote 
// so they are feeling happy
function handleSessionEndRequest(callback) {
    const cardTitle = 'Session Ended';
    const speechOutput = getSurfPhrase() + " See you in the water";
    const shouldEndSession = true;
    callback({}, buildSpeechletResponse(cardTitle, speechOutput, null, shouldEndSession));
}

function handleHelpIntent(intent, session, callback) {
    const cardTitle = 'Help';
    const speechOutput = "Here's some help. You can let me know of any surf spot and I can give you the report for a given day. Start by telling me where you would like to surf. If you can't think of any spots try pipeline, trestles, steamer lane. You can also ask for information about any surf location by saying tell me about pipeline for example.";
    const shouldEndSession = false;
    callback({}, buildSpeechletResponse(cardTitle, speechOutput, speechOutput, shouldEndSession));
}

//Call the surf report api to get the information
function handleApiCallAndCallback(session, callback) {
        const shouldEndSession = false;
        var repromptText = "";
        var cardTitle;
        var isBestFlow = (session.attributes.dateSelected === "best");

        http.get(`http://magicseaweed.com/api/${process.env.MAGICSWAPIKEY}/forecast/?units=us&spot_id=${session.attributes.spotId}`, function(res) {
        var body = '';

        res.on('data', function (chunk) {
            body += chunk;
        });

        res.on('end', function () {
            var results = JSON.parse(body);
            var finalResult;
            
            if(session.attributes.dateSelected === "best") {
                finalResult = results.reduce(function(aggregator, result) {
                    if(!aggregator) {
                        return result;
                    }
                    if(result.solidRating > aggregator.solidRating) {
                        return result;
                    } else if (result.solidRating === aggregator.solidRating && result.fadedRating > aggregator.fadedRating) {
                        return result;
                    }
                    return aggregator;
                }, null);
                session.attributes.dateSelected = finalResult.localTimestamp * 1000;
            } else {
                finalResult = results.filter(function(result) {
                    return (new Date(result.localTimestamp * 1000).toString().substring(0, 15)) === new Date(session.attributes.dateSelected).toString().substring(0, 15);
                });  
                finalResult = finalResult.length ? finalResult[0] : null;
            }
            cardTitle = `${session.attributes.locationName} Surf Report - ${new Date(session.attributes.dateSelected).toString().substring(0, 10)}`;
            var finalText = "";
            if(finalResult) {
              finalText = getReportText(finalResult, new Date(session.attributes.dateSelected).toString().substring(0, 15), session.attributes.locationName, isBestFlow);
              console.log(finalText);
              repromptText = "Would you like any more information? Just give me another day you want to surf at " + session.attributes.locationName + " or tell me another spot you want a report for. You can also say best and I will pick you the best day or say describe this spot.";
              finalText += repromptText;
            } else {
               finalText = "No Information found - try another day";
               repromptText = finalText;
            }
            callback(session.attributes, buildSpeechletResponse(cardTitle, finalText, repromptText, shouldEndSession));
        }).on('error', function (e) {
               console.log("Got error: ", e);
               var finalText = "No Information found - try another day";
            callback(session.attributes, buildSpeechletResponse(cardTitle, finalText, finalText, shouldEndSession));
        });
    });
}

// Get the text we want to output out of the API response
function getReportText(reportInfo, date, locationName, isBestFlow) {
    var swellHeightText = (reportInfo.swell.minBreakingHeight === reportInfo.swell.maxBreakingHeight ? `${reportInfo.swell.maxBreakingHeight}` : `${reportInfo.swell.minBreakingHeight} to ${reportInfo.swell.maxBreakingHeight}`);  
    if(!reportInfo.swell.maxBreakingHeight) {
        swellHeightText = `${Math.floor(reportInfo.swell.components.combined.height)}`;
    }
    var windDirection = getCompassDirection(reportInfo.wind.compassDirection);
    var swellDirection = getCompassDirection(reportInfo.swell.components.combined.compassDirection);
    console.log("swell" + windDirection + reportInfo.wind.compassDirection);
    var reportText = `there will be a ${swellDirection} swell with a height of ${swellHeightText} feet, and a period of ${reportInfo.swell.components.combined.period} seconds. The wind will be blowing ${windDirection} at ${reportInfo.wind.speed} miles per hour with gusts of up to ${reportInfo.wind.gusts} miles per hour. `;

    if(isBestFlow) {
        return `The best day this week for you to surf at ${locationName} is ${date}. ${reportText}`
    } else {
         return `On ${date} at ${locationName} ${reportText}`
    }
    
   
}

// Translate directions from the API into words that alexa can speak 
function getCompassDirection(direction) {
     switch (direction) {
         case "W":
             return "West";
         case "NW":
             return "North West";
         case "WNW":
             return "West North West";
         case "S":
             return "South";
         case "SE":
             return "South East";
         case "ESE":
             return "East South East";
         case "N":
             return "North";
         case "NE":
             return "North East";
         case "ENE":
             return "East North East";
         case "E":
             return "East";
         case "SW":
             return "South West";
         case "WSW":
             return "West South West";
         case "NNE":
             return "North North East";
         case "SSE":
             return "South South East";
         case "SSW":
             return "South South West";
         case "NNW":
             return "North North West";             

     }
     return "Unknown direction";
}

// Handles when a user says the day they want to surf. This also expect that the user has already picked a 
// location which should be stored in their session. If they haven't then they are prompted to do so.
function handleDayOfWeekIntent(intent, session, callback) {
    const dateSelected = intent.slots.Date.value;

    if(!dateSelected) {
        let cardTitle = "Try again";
        let finalText = "I'm not sure I understood - please tell me where and when you would like to surf.";
        callback({}, buildSpeechletResponse(cardTitle, finalText, finalText, false));
        return;
    }
    if(!session.attributes.spotId) {
        let cardTitle = "Pick a location first.";
        let finalText = "Please tell me the location you would like to surf first";
        callback({}, buildSpeechletResponse(cardTitle, finalText, finalText, false));
        return;
    }
    session.attributes.dateSelected = dateSelected;
    handleApiCallAndCallback(session, callback);
}

// Allow the user a quicker method of both specifying a location and a day at once
function handleDateAndLocationIntent(intent, session, callback) {
    var finalText;
    var spotName = intent.slots.Spots.value;
    const cardTitle = spotName;
    if(!spotName || !getSpotInfoFromName(spotName) || !intent.slots.Date.value) {
        finalText = "I'm not sure I understood that location and time. Try again.";
        let cardTitle = "Please try again";
        callback({}, buildSpeechletResponse(cardTitle, finalText, finalText, false));
    }
    
    var spotId = getSpotInfoFromName(spotName).id;
    var sessionAttributes = { dateSelected: intent.slots.Date.value, locationName: toTitleCase(spotName), spotId: spotId };
    session.attributes = sessionAttributes;
    handleApiCallAndCallback(session, callback);
}

// Gets the location that the user picked. We then check to make sure this is a location we 
// can understand against our map of locations to Ids so that we can determine whether or 
// not we can handle the request. If the location is unknown then prompt for the user
// to pick a new location
function handleSurfLocationIntent(intent, session, callback) {
    var finalText;
    var spotName = intent.slots.Spots.value;
    const cardTitle = spotName;
    if(!spotName || !getSpotInfoFromName(spotName)) {
        finalText = "I'm not sure I understood that location. Try another location.";
        let cardTitle = "Please try again";
        callback({}, buildSpeechletResponse(cardTitle, finalText, finalText, false));
    }
    
    var spotId = getSpotInfoFromName(spotName).id;
    finalText = `You picked ${spotName}. When would you like the report for? Say Best if you want me to pick you a day!`;
    // Store the name of the location and the ID in the session
    var sessionAttributes = { locationName: toTitleCase(spotName), spotId: spotId };
    callback(sessionAttributes, buildSpeechletResponse(cardTitle, finalText, finalText, false));
}

function handleGetDescriptionIntent(intent, session, callback) {
    if(!session.attributes.locationName) {
        let cardTitle = "Pick a location first.";
        let finalText = "Please tell me the location you want a description for first";
        callback({}, buildSpeechletResponse(cardTitle, finalText, finalText, false));
        return;
    }
    
    var spotInfo = getSpotInfoFromName(session.attributes.locationName);
    if(spotInfo && spotInfo.description) {
        let cardTitle = session.attributes.locationName;
        let finalText = spotInfo.description;
        let repromptText = " Would you like any more information about this spot? Let me know a day you'd like to surf here or pick another spot.";
        finalText += repromptText;
        callback(session.attributes, buildSpeechletResponse(cardTitle, finalText, repromptText, false));
    } else {
        let cardTitle = "No information available";
        let finalText = "Sorry there is no description available for this spot. Please try another request or pick a day you would like to surf here.";
        callback(session.attributes, buildSpeechletResponse(cardTitle, finalText, finalText, false));
    }
}

function handleGetDescriptionForLocationIntent(intent, session, callback) {
    var finalText;
    var spotName = intent.slots.Location.value;
    const cardTitle = spotName;
    if(!spotName || !getSpotInfoFromName(spotName)) {
        finalText = "I'm not sure I understood that location. Please try again.";
        let cardTitle = "Please try again";
        callback({}, buildSpeechletResponse(cardTitle, finalText, finalText, false));
    }
    
    var spotId = getSpotInfoFromName(spotName).id;
    var sessionAttributes = {  locationName: toTitleCase(spotName), spotId: spotId };
    session.attributes = sessionAttributes;
    handleGetDescriptionIntent(intent, session, callback);
}

function handleBestTimeToSurfIntent(intent, session, callback) {
    if(!session.attributes.spotId) {
        let cardTitle = "Pick a location first.";
        let finalText = "Please tell me the location you would like to surf first";
        callback({}, buildSpeechletResponse(cardTitle, finalText, finalText, false));
        return;
    }
    session.attributes.dateSelected = "best";
    handleApiCallAndCallback(session, callback);
}


function handleBestTimeToSurfWithLocationIntent(intent, session, callback) {
    var finalText;
    var spotName = intent.slots.Location.value;
    const cardTitle = spotName;
    if(!spotName || !getSpotInfoFromName(spotName)) {
        finalText = "I'm not sure I understood that location. Please try again.";
        let cardTitle = "Please try again";
        callback({}, buildSpeechletResponse(cardTitle, finalText, finalText, false));
    }
    
    var spotId = getSpotInfoFromName(spotName).id;
    var sessionAttributes = { dateSelected: "best", locationName: toTitleCase(spotName), spotId: spotId };
    session.attributes = sessionAttributes;
    handleApiCallAndCallback(session, callback);
}

function toTitleCase(str)
{
    return str.replace(/\w\S*/g, function(txt){return txt.charAt(0).toUpperCase() + txt.substr(1).toLowerCase();});
}

// A function to be able to map the location names to IDs and their descriptions. 
//The names are stored in lowercase to prevent any issues with the uterrances that alexa can understand
function getSpotInfoFromName(name) {
    var locationToIdData = {"88":{"description":"Zhelang area or Hong Hoi Wan is the best bet with powerful, peaks near a series of jetties, but be aware this area sits next to a power plant and new industrial zone so pollution is a problem.  In 2003, the 720 surfing contest saw Japan's Shinichi Yoshida become the first surfing champion of China. The jetties have sculpted some excellent sand banks at 88, sheltered from sideshore N-NE winds and it’s usually offshore in the morning with a  left breaking off the northern jetty and beautiful A-Frames inside. ","id":3466},"porthtowan":{"description":"Powerful, hollow beachbreak peaks if the sandbanks are good, plus a bit of wind protection in the southern corner. Consistent, often crowded, rippy and handles some swell, so not really for beginners. ","id":2},"gwithian":{"description":"More sheltered section of beachbreaks south of Godrevy. Great for beginners looking for a bit of space. ","id":3},"sennen":{"description":"Consistent, swell-sucking beachbreak just north of Land’s End is Britain's most westerly beach. Punchy peaks with barrels when offshore on a medium swell and tide. ","id":4},"constantine":{"description":"Swell magnet, beachbreak peaks in the middle of the bay, left off the reef at the south end, right off the point at the north end (quality depends on sand flow from river) and Booby's to the north has a good but fickle low tide right reef. ","id":5},"bude - crooklets":{"description":"Hollow, fast, sandbar peaks plus Wrangles Rocks at the north end at low tide. High tide Tower Rock has a shallow wave and there’s Crookie shorey as well. ","id":6},"croyde beach":{"description":"World-class, low tide, A-frame barrels. Probably the best beachbreak in the UK on its day. Less shape at other stages of tide. Highly consistent beach that can get dangerously crowded. Strong rips at size. ","id":7},"praa sands":{"description":"Classy, fast, tubular beachbreak. Offshore in N winds - dumpy at high, rippy at low. Medium consistency and always busy when on. ","id":8},"whitsand bay":{"description":"7km of beachbreak peaks, loads of room so easy to find a quiet peak.","id":9},"bantham":{"description":"Consistent, classy beachbreak with sandbars sculpted by the River Avon. Right into the rivermouth and a peak on the main beach. ","id":10},"kimmeridge":{"description":"Long, fun, mellow reefbreaks that can handle some size, lefts being favoured. Popular with longboarders, and spreads out the Kimmeridge crowd. A few rocks and rips at size.","id":11},"bournemouth":{"description":"Fun, beachbreak peaks with sandbars anchored by the pier. East side is the most popular spot on the Channel coast, with lefts heading back into the pier and faster rights leading down the beach. More peaks on the west side without the SW wind protection. Paddling channel next to pier. On a solid SW groundswell (or SE windswell) and N wind there are barrels for the taking. ","id":12},"isle of wight - compton ":{"description":"Beachbreak peaks to the east of Freshwater, usually better with more water. Plenty of other beach/reef options on this southwest-facing coast in big SW swells providing the wind has N or E in it. ","id":13},"east wittering":{"description":"4 mile stretch of average peaks from Wittering to Selsey, along a beach held together by numerous groynes. ","id":14},"brighton - west pier":{"description":"Popular, slow longboard wave that's not been the same since the pier burnt down. Sandbanks aren't what they were and it wasn't that good to start with. ","id":15},"birling gap":{"description":"Just a chance of some groundswell reaching Birling gap. Often surfed on SW wind swells.","id":16},"joss bay":{"description":"Kent's main surf spot, the hub of surfing in the area since the ‘60s has L/R peaks over sandbars and chalk reefs. Best in strong N swells but works on windswell from many directions. Can be rippy and reefs can get shallow. ","id":18},"cromer":{"description":"Miles of average Norfolk beachbreak over sand and flint bottom, but the large pier gives banks some shape. The west side works on large NW swells but it’s the east side that gets wedgy rights running back into the pier on any N-E swells, plus slow mushy lefts. Further east, the rock groyne can have a rare punchy left. ","id":20},"withernsea":{"description":"Unspectacular beachbreak surfed when the breaks further north are blown-out, mainly lefts. Watch out for groynes on higher tides and strong longshore drift.","id":21},"scarborough - south bay":{"description":"On N swells a slow, beginner-friendly beachbreak, with a rare SE swell it can get hollow and fast. ","id":22},"whitby":{"description":"Fun beachbreaks in small N swells, favouring a defined left. Can be a hollow right down the west side of the pier in E swells. ","id":23},"saltburn beach":{"description":"Slow, but popular beachbreak, centre of the scene in the region. Good banks around the pier and a punchy, low tide bank to the eastern end at Penny Hole.","id":24},"sunderland":{"description":"Good, wedging right off the harbour wall in Roker and a range of average beachbreak options at Roker, Seaburn and Whitburn. ","id":25},"tynemouth - longsands":{"description":"Popular, fun beachbreak at the centre of the Newcastle scene. Works through the tide but best on higher tides. ","id":26},"hells mouth (porth neigwl)":{"description":"Popular 7km stretch of average beachbreak, good for beginners, best mid to high. ","id":27},"pease bay":{"description":"Surprisingly long, peeling righthanders over sand and cobble at the south end plus a left sandbar at north end. Often slow breaking but fun, accessible waves that get fin-snappingly shallow as the tide drops out. ","id":28},"porthcawl - coney beach":{"description":"Short, hollow, left reef in front of Porthcawl esplanade. Popular with lids and air loving groms. Needs plenty of tide and cold N winds. Around the lighthouse is Coney Beach, a wide, flat, breakwall protected expanse of tourist sand for beginners, stand-ups and cruisers unless there's some storm swell and strong westerlies pushing up the channel. Last resort spot where the best rides are probably in the fun fair.","id":29},"aberavon":{"description":"Fast, wedging left off a rocky groyne that’s not been so good since the breakwater extension. Average peaks further N up the beach. Banks haven’t seen the sand loss of the Gower beaches. Like all breaks in this area, needs pushing tides to high water to get swell in up the channel. ","id":30},"langland bay":{"description":"Langland is the spot for South Wales’ surfers with something for everyone depending on the tide. At high tide there’s The Shorey, until Rotherslade lefts and The Reef start working as the tide drops. At lower tides, Middle of the Bay, the Sandbar and Shit Pipe are all very busy all the time. ","id":31},"llangennith / rhossili":{"description":"5km stretch of average yet consistent beachbreak. Picks up all available swell and is popular with all abilities and types of wavecraft. Over head height, the paddle out is renowned for its difficulty. Three Peaks at the N end has more size and power, while Rhossili at the S end picks up less swell and has shelter from S quadrant winds. Rips and jellyfish.  ","id":32},"tenby south beach":{"description":"Deep shelter winter only wave, fast, hollow and crowded when on. ","id":33},"freshwater west":{"description":"Most consistent spot in Wales and site of the Welsh nationals. Average beachbreak in north of the bay that holds plenty of size. Fast, hollow sandbar waves at low tide in front of the Furzenip rocks in the middle and reef/beach options to the south. ","id":34},"newgale":{"description":"Covering all the breaks in the St. Brides Bay area.","id":35},"barmouth":{"description":"Covering the region from Harlech, Llandanwg south to Barmouth.","id":36},"anglesey (ynys môn)":{"description":"Gutless beachbreaks at Rhosneigr, Treaddur, Cable Bay and Aberffraw needing a huge SW swell to make it up St Georges Channel. Rarely epic. Easy access.","id":37},"st andrews east":{"description":"Inconsistent beachbreak that can get epic when a big swell wraps in. Closes out on dropping tide. ","id":38},"lunan bay":{"description":"Beautiful bay with shifting beachbreak peaks. Left point and south end good on N swells and north end good on S swells. Can have bad rips, especially on the dropping tide near the rivermouth. ","id":39},"stonehaven ":{"description":"Good right reef at south end and pebble/sand beachbreak. Works in SE and big NE swells. Easy paddle out in rivermouth. ","id":40},"aberdeen - beach":{"description":"Fast, hollow waves breaking on sandbars held in place by groynes on this 1.5mile stretch of beach. Hollow peaks at low to mid tide and good rights into the River Don. ","id":41},"peterhead (sandford bay) ":{"description":"Sucky, hollow left reef at north end and average beachbreak peaks. ","id":42},"fraserburgh":{"description":"The Broch is a long, fun, left pointbreak at the northwest end of the beach surfed by a keen crew of locals; it doesn’t work that often so be respectful. ","id":43},"banff - beach":{"description":"Good low tide beachbreaks at the harbour end of beach, shelter from SW winds. ","id":44},"lossiemouth":{"description":"Sheltered beach needs a really big swell to get going. Can have good, lined-up left at north end. ","id":45},"sinclairs bay - beach":{"description":"High quality beachbreak visible from the A9, rivermouth gives the banks good shape in middle of beach. ","id":46},"thurso east":{"description":"Scotland’s premier righthand reefbreak and a world-class barrel on its day. In NW swells at mid tide a relatively simple drop leads into one of the longest, hollowest rides in Europe. Even the biggest W swells won’t get in without a touch of N; WNW swells are hollowest and the more N in the swell the mellower the wave. SW winds blow into the barrel and bump it up but it can still be fun in an onshore. ","id":47},"islay (machir bay)":{"description":"Punchy beachbreaks, well lined-up left off the point to the north. Beware of rips. ","id":48},"isle of lewis":{"description":"Dalmore is a well formed beachbreak that’s fun when small, but serious and rippy at size. Walled up peaks that speed over the changeable sandbars. ","id":49},"bundoran - the peak":{"description":"At low tide the flawless A-frame peak gives a short, hollow right and a longer, high-performance left. Always very crowded, unless it’s big. Look out for rocks, rips and poor water quality after rains (always!). ","id":50},"strandhill":{"description":"Popular beachbreak with a variety of options. Split peaks in the middle of the beach that can get hollow; Bluerock - a long righthand boulder point at the north end and a rivermouth sandbar at the south. ","id":51},"lahinch - beach":{"description":" The beach has good shape and is always busy; locals surf in front of the surf shop, beginners go for the gentler peaks to the north. Care is needed around high tide as the beach is covered. ","id":52},"inch reefs":{"description":"Ireland’s most mythical wave is a super-long, righthand reef that can peel for 400m or more. Very rare to get the required NE wind and big swell. When it’s on, low tide is best. Getting in and out is tricky and the rip pulling away from the wave is as legendary as the wave itself. Big crowds if on. ","id":53},"long strand (castlefreke)":{"description":"Fickle beachbreak that fires if the wind’s offshore. Gets grunty and hollow at low with good banks at each end of the beach and more peaks in the middle. Normally onshore, messy and always rippy. Shoredump at high tide. ","id":54},"tramore - strand":{"description":"The centre of surfing in SE Ireland boasting a large surf club and a 5km stretch of beach. Average beachbreak peaks that occasionally turn on with the elusive NE offshore. Usually better at higher tides. ","id":55},"portrush":{"description":"Quality, but fickle, lefthand boulder reef at the west end of West Strand, needs exact swell direction to work. Shallow and rocky so it’s mid/high tide only. ","id":56},"naples":{"description":"Covering all Naples area breaks.","id":57},"venice beach":{"description":"Hollow, somewhat fickle wintertime sandbars, good up to a foot or two overhead. Needs outgoing tides and larger W swells. Plenty of board-snapping potential. Definitely not for beginners.","id":2611},"north malin":{"description":"This forecast assumes that a South wind is offshore - but with beaches facing about 180° you should be able to find some offshore here. Just adjust the forecast to compensate.","id":59},"clearwater":{"description":"Covering all the breaks in the Clearwater area.","id":60},"hossegor (la graviere)":{"description":"Sited on an old gravel pit, this is the legendary Hossegor tube spot. Dredging the rivermouth has affected wave quality in the past, but it is back with a vengeance, hosting pro-surfing competitions in huge conditions, including the 2011 Quik Pro. Sometimes white-caps outside, rolls in and reforms, standing up over the shallow inside bars. Heavy, thick-lipped beasts, break perilously close to shore and often close-out, snapping more boards than just about anywhere. Tidal range radically affects the window for ideal conditions, as does swell period, which decides if it is messy and inconsistent or lined-up and bombing through. The rip speed usually rises in direct proportion with the swell height and on big days, only the tow crew will be able to get into the sets before being swept south in the current.","id":61},"biarritz grande plage":{"description":"The Basque coast’s chic city beach receives less swell than Anglet, but handles a very large variety of conditions. Rocks on the south part of the beach contribute to the beauty of the site while shaping the banks and blocking S-SW winds. Sometimes the fat rolling peaks are fun and easy, other times they are sucky and close-out. ","id":62},"mimizan-plage":{"description":"Quiet place but with good enough waves to produce bodyboard champ Nicolas Capdeville. Four beaches on either side of the rivermouth that helps sculpt some good sandbars, particularly from mid to high tide. ","id":63},"vieux boucau":{"description":"The D652 gets closer to the coast here, allowing easy checking of several peaks. There are waves on both entrances to the lake. North side has fast, hollow peaks on higher tides, but heavy longshore rips at headhigh plus. Port d’Albret on the south side leads into the Soustons stretch and has good shape for kilometers. Handles more size than the breaks to the north. ","id":64},"biscarrosse-plage":{"description":"Popular summer resort town with typical shifting bars, from high tide thumping shories to outer low tide bars that can be fast and hollow in sections. Seems to favour rights as the sand goes with the flow from N-S. ","id":65},"lacanau":{"description":"ASP contest venue since 1979, this is surf central for the Bordeaux area. The reason? Consistent surf, easily checked from the boardwalk at Plage Centrale before opting for a session at La Nord, La Sud or Super Sud among 14km of beaches ideal with a medium size W-NW swell. Handles more size thanks to the deep scalloped baines around the rock jetties that are there to hold the sand in place. Every bit as good as Landes, especially in summer when it is often bigger in the W windswells. Fast peeling low tide runners or mid to high tide shories tapering into the rips are sometimes separated by a deep trench, or spin all the way through. Like all Biscay beachies, it's fine for beginners when small and friendly, but a real challenge when overhead and bombing, not least because of the wicked rips.","id":66},"soulac":{"description":"With the rivermouth creating offshore sandbanks, waves are always smaller here but hollower than surrounding spots.","id":67},"chassiron":{"description":"Peaks break over a rocky, uneven shelf leading into long walled lefts and shorter rights at lower tides only. Get out at mid tide before the surge over the reef. ","id":68},"l'aubraie":{"description":"Another beach with several peaks over fingers of reef, where the short, hollow lefts are always better than the rights. Gets longer and softer depending on the tide, with the reef preferring high when the beach turns into shoredump with backwash. ","id":69},"les donnants":{"description":"Les Donnants is the most consistent beachbreak on the island of Belle-Île, with some defined rights and a left back into the cliff channel. There’s more surf to the south (in Herlin) and even on the east side, in Port An-Dro. ","id":70},"guidel (les kaolins)":{"description":"Near perfect, tubular, fast rights breaking over a shallow ledge. There is also a sucky left off the peak, but it can section off, so the rights are preferred. Rare thanks to narrow swell and tide window and wind sensitivity. ","id":71},"la torche ":{"description":"Seminal Brittany surfspot with ultra-consistent, walled-up peak breaking beside rocky headland. Shorter but hollower rights break into the rip known as the elevator which flows straight to the peak. Lefts speed down the beach, but paddle back can be gruelling, so think about walking around to the rip. Many more breaks further north along beach at Tronoën or Penhors and mellow rights at the La Torche point at the end of Audierne Bay. ","id":72},"baie des trépassés (lescoff)":{"description":"A good beachbreak with long rides when the conditions are ideal: low tide and a small W swell. This impressive cove picks up any swell going, churning out some long walls and also occasionally some hefty barrels off the high tide rock at the north end. There will be a crowd on small swell weekends, but there are plenty of easy waves stretched across the bay for all abilities.  ","id":73},"blancs-sablons":{"description":"A large cove offering little else than a sloppy beach break that closes out easily.  Filters out big SW swell and wind. Beginners will enjoy the space.","id":74},"lampaul ploudalmezeau":{"description":"Covering a range of spots but giving wind reports based on the south east offshore required at Penfoul.","id":75},"le dossen ":{"description":"A long sandy beach so exposed to the wind that a sail or kite is recommended. Less sloppy by the river, which works at lower tides or head to the multitude of peaks in the middle for high tide rollers perfect for longboarding and beginners.","id":76},"trestaou  ":{"description":"Perros Guirec locals enjoy a hollow beachbreak right in the city during westerly storms, thanks to it's tucked-in, northeast-facing position. An outside reef peak will rear up some rights in big swells. The pocket beach to the east holds the inconsistent and often crowded righthander of Pors Nevez over rock and sand, where more S in the wind and low to mid tide is needed.","id":77},"plage du sillon (st malo)":{"description":"St Malo’s main beach is surfed on SW storms, best peaks next to la Hoguette groin. ","id":78},"le rozel":{"description":"This quality Cotentin peak attracts the weekend crowd and holds shape up to 10ft, though it’s often blown-out. Looks inviting on a WSW headhigh pulse and morning land breeze with an incoming tide. Sciotot, at the north end of the bay is less organised, but a quieter option. ","id":79},"etretat":{"description":"Beneath the world-famous rock formation ‘l’Aiguille Creuse’ (the hollow needle), Etretat is a consistent mid tide peak that favours lefts. Best on wrapping SW swells, but also works on NE windchop. SW winds are cross-offshore and it maintains some shape even when onshores blow in. ","id":80},"cape town":{"description":"Milnerton Lighthouse in the north of this zone is an average beach break, whilst nearby The Wedge is the place to go if you fancy polluted barrels. ","id":81},"sutton on sea":{"description":"With a long E / ENE facing coastline this forecast should be good for most of the Lincolnshire coast north to the Humber and south to the Skegness forecast.","id":82},"skegness":{"description":"Covering all east facing beaches in the area.","id":83},"borth / ynyslas ":{"description":"Long stretch of beachbreak peaks. Best at Ynyslas end in summer. Borth end is sheltered from SW winds. ","id":84},"machrihanish":{"description":"Good rivermouth peaks although smaller than Westport. Protected from SW gales at south end. Right pointbreak below pub as well. ","id":85},"treasure island":{"description":"One of Indo’s best pointbreak-style reefs harvests a field of almond barrels, backlit by the pristine jungle environment that blankets this protected conservation island. An easy roll-in leads to the first of up to 4 throwing tube sections linked by ripable, stiff-lipped walls for 200m+. Attracts long-range charters when medium to big SSW swells meet NW winds, but there are plenty of waves to go round. The outside indicator reefs are for barrel-crazy experts only and further inside the bay is Minis, a playful right with a short tube and workable face on large swells.","id":3321},"durban":{"description":"The popular city beaches of The Bay of Plenty are home to South Africa’s most intense surf scene. Consistent and hollow waves break on both S and E swells, typically breaking about 100m offshore between several rock jetties. ","id":87},"jeffreys bay (j-bay)":{"description":"The longest, most perfect righthand pointbreak on the planet, consists of no less than 10 different sections including Kitchen Windows, Magnatubes, Boneyards, Supertubes, Impossibles, Salad Bowls, Coins, Tubes, The Point and finally Albatross. Fingers of basalt hold the sand uniformly, creating the perfect bathymetry for 1km long rides between Boneyards and The Point when the swell is just the right size and perfectly lined up. Supertubes is the stellar section, where the pro competitions are held and the crew are most combative, while Point and Albatross are slower, more manageable walls for intermediates and longboarders. Maintaining high speed and a high line is critical for threading the multiple tube sections and cutting back is rarely a good idea. SW-W is offshore for most of the sections, while NW-NE Berg (or Devil) winds descend from the mountains, blowing into the barrels and creating a nasty chop that is hard to handle on a wave where speed is king.","id":88},"port elizabeth":{"description":"Reef breaks found at the Fence on Cape Recife road near the Humewood suburb are all worth checking out.","id":89},"piha":{"description":"Piha is New Zealand's most famous surf beach, 40km (25mi) from the City of Sails and this black, iron-sand beach has a reputation for awesome surf. With rugged cliffs and the majestic Lion Rock standing guard over the beach, the scenery is dramatic and inspiring. The beach is backed by the Waitakere Ranges, a protected parkland of sub-tropical forest, accessible through numerous bush tracks. When the swell is small, good surf can often be found up the Big Beach at North Piha, while wedgy peaks break on both sides of Lion Rock where currents can help with the paddle out. ","id":90},"raglan":{"description":"Covering the famous point from indicators and including Whale Bay and Manu Bay.\\r\\n","id":91},"whangamata":{"description":"Beach peaks and a rivermouth bar.","id":92},"mount maunganui":{"description":"Covering the Mount beaches and down the coast to Papamoa.","id":93},"durness (balnakeil bay)":{"description":"Long stretch of exposed, average, west-facing beachbreak. Handles some N wind. ","id":94},"coldingham bay":{"description":"Punchy, hollow beachbreak needing a large NE swell to work. Tight peak that can get busy at weekends. Some rocks. ","id":95},"skail bay right":{"description":"A short high-speed ferry trip from Gills Bay to Stromness on Mainland in the Orkney Islands will uncover some more great waves breaking over slabs of slate and sedimentary rock. Picks up W-N Atlantic swells plus NE-SE North Sea swells on the eastern islands although they remain unsurfed. Winds are strong and constant so getting the required E winds takes patience. Highlights include Skara Brae, a long consistent left point opposite Skail Bay an equally long perfect righthander over flat reef. Further north around Marwick are moody slab reefs that amplify the swell and a boulder right point. These are just the known, easy to get to spots and the potential is enormous.","id":96},"birsay bay":{"description":"Covering breaks in the bay area.","id":97},"eoropie":{"description":"Consistent, fast, hollow beachbreak. In a N swell and SE wind the long right tubes are a sight to behold. Extremely rippy at size, which it can handle.","id":98},"filey":{"description":"Back up beach for stormy conditions, some shelter from N winds due to the headland. Other peaks further south in clean conditions. ","id":99},"fisk helliar":{"description":"Covering all North facing breaks.","id":100},"bu sands":{"description":"Good for most East facing breaks in the Orkneys","id":101},"mangersta":{"description":"Small sandy beach exposed to any W swell and wind. A couple of peaks best around mid tide providing the swell is around headhigh. ","id":102},"scarasta":{"description":"Long drive down from Stornaway to this NW-facing crescent beach that can handle some SW wind in the lee of the southern corner. May be smaller than the northern spots but still breaks with power. ","id":103},"new plymouth":{"description":"Covering the local breaks and surrounding beaches.","id":104},"stent road":{"description":"All around here are small tracks leading through farms to the ocean and waves. Always ask permission before crossing someone’s property and close all farm gates. The area swarms with decent reefs; Paora Road, Stent Road or Weld Road are the best known. Most of the waves here need a high tide and an offshore wind, (although a couple of them can handle SW winds), and they can also hold big waves. ","id":105},"opunake":{"description":"When the winds turn to the N/NE in the spring/summer, head for Opunake, a town of 1,600 people that hosts a good beach break and several nearby, killer spots. These waves are very consistent, but usually quite messy with onshore winds. Low tide is better. ","id":106},"lyall bay":{"description":"Covering all the city beaches.","id":107},"ohope beach":{"description":"Covering all breaks on this area of the Bay of Plenty","id":108},"papamoa beach":{"description":"Covering all papamoa beach breaks.","id":109},"gizzy pipe (gisborne)":{"description":"The Gizzy Pipe is another potential world class barrelling right sandbar but more often than not, it closes out. Waikanae and Midway Beach are ideal beginner’s waves. ","id":110},"rolling stones (mahia peninsula)":{"description":"To reach the next spot east involves getting permission to cross private property. A gravel track leads down to a spot called Rolling Stones, so named because of the boulders littering the shorebreak. On a good quality swell this morphs into a world class right hand point break and on the other side of the bay, a left. ","id":111},"diners beach":{"description":"Diners Beach, the only spot on the actual peninsula is an average, empty beach break. ","id":112},"mangamaunu":{"description":"The wave with the best credentials is undoubtedly Mangamaunu, along SH1 highway. This Rincon-like, right pointbreak is a beauty, aided by its proximity to the snow-covered Kaikoura Range. The cool air blowing off the mountains creates offshores that blow every morning and during the winter, it can blow all day, despite the prevailing NE winds. The walls are hollow but not too powerful and long, cruisey rides are the norm. Big NE-E swells will result in epic conditions, while S-SE swells create more rips and it gets some crowds but nothing worrying as other pointbreaks peel close-by. ","id":113},"new brighton beach":{"description":"Christchurch city area only offers average beachbreaks like New Brighton, the centre of beach culture and also the only webcam. ","id":114},"st clair (dunedin)":{"description":"St-Clair is the hub of Dunedin surfing, blessed with good quality beachbreak peaks and when there’s a big S swell, the long right point near the Salt water hot pools sections off over rock, sand and kelp.","id":115},"greymouth":{"description":"Covering all breaks in the area.","id":116},"westport":{"description":"Sandbar rights at north end of Macrihinish Bay. Fickle tide-dependant spot that can be epic. ","id":1425},"90 mile beach":{"description":"90 Mile Beach, one of longest virgin beaches on earth, is marked as National Highway at low tide! Beware of soft sand - a 4WD is crucial. Small peaky swells with NE winds will create good conditions. ","id":118},"port bharrapol (tiree)":{"description":"Range of reef options and rocky beach in a magnificent bay. ","id":119},"jersey":{"description":"Consistent, shapely beachbreak and the epicentre of Jersey surfing, where being seen is more important than going surfing. Better at lower tides. ","id":120},"el palmar":{"description":"Top class peaks over epic sandbars anchored by underlying rock strata and sculpted by rip currents. Plenty of space for all abilities but it suffers in strong E winds and high tides.","id":121},"forestry":{"description":"Beginners should go to Ocean Beach or Forestry for reliable beachbreaks and also a left point in NE swells, which gets crowded on weekends. ","id":122},"owaka area":{"description":"Covering all breaks on the coast south and east of Owaka and west coast towards invercargill.","id":123},"papatowai":{"description":"Papatowai holds some of New Zealand’s biggest waves, where tow-in teams and experienced paddlers try to ride the long barrelling right or lethal, ledging left.","id":124},"riverton rocks":{"description":"West of Invercargill, Riverton Rocks hold really long cruisey rights if a big S swell wraps in at low tide. ","id":125},"pors ar villec (locquirec)":{"description":"‘Porza’ is the most consistent spot in the laid-back surf area of Locquirec. Fast and hollow over the sand-covered reef when the NW swell hits or clean little longboard peelers when small and groomed by any S wind. ","id":126},"praia da rocha":{"description":"A hollow and inconsistent left breaks off the jetty in the heart of the major tourist resort of Portimão. It’s renowned for its tubes but gets very busy. Needs a big swell to work. ","id":127},"sagres (tonel)":{"description":"The most consistent of the Sagres beaches is generally pretty average. Lower tidal stages on the push are better as is a W swell. It doesn’t pick up as much swell as the west coast so it is a popular place for beginner/intermediates and the many local bodyboarders. ","id":128},"sines":{"description":"Covering breaks in the area.","id":129},"taghazout":{"description":"Often snubbed by Anka’s aficionados since it’s fickle, fast and plagued by currents. Less crowds and good barrels are the trade-off.","id":131},"napier":{"description":"Covering breaks in the town area including Haumoana and Te Awanga","id":132},"cotillo":{"description":"Powerful beachbreak with barrel sections when sandbanks return after winter scouring. Often closes out when swell is overhead or tide is wrong for the banks. North end offers some N-NE wind protection but it's often crowded. ","id":133},"majanicho":{"description":"Picks up any swell from the north and bends it down a straigt reef into the deep bay at the growing village of Majanicho. Long rides that shoulder off predictably and give plenty of cutback practice for intermediates and cruisers. Gets rammed with wind rigs if it's blowing E.","id":134},"falmouth":{"description":"Rare, deep shelter beachbreaks. Maenporth, Gyllyngvase and Swanpool beaches only get quality waves on massive SW swells. There is also a right reef at the west end of Gyllyngvase. E gales in the channel will also produce a rideable wave.","id":135},"whitesands bay":{"description":"Good beachbreak peaks up to double-overhead, useful rip along rocks at N end for paddling out. Prefers W swell as Ramsey Island blocks the SW. ","id":136},"lyme regis":{"description":"Covering breaks in the area - needs large south swells or south west wind swells to work. Our rating will be based on all channel swells so may be optimistic for this area - adjust accordingly.","id":137},"santander (el sardinero)":{"description":"East-facing average-quality beachbreak.  Works best in big storms with W or NW winds.  ","id":138},"teignmouth":{"description":"Bear in mind that the swell data is taken a little way offshore and will show some west and southwest swell which is very unlikely to show itself here - keep an eye out for easterly swells coming down the channel","id":139},"waddeneilanden":{"description":"The Wadden Islands are typical low-lying barrier islands with shifting sandbanks along open, unstabilised beaches. Picks up the lions share of any NW swell but the lack of jetties means it needs groomed sandbars and offshore winds to be any good.","id":140},"oostende":{"description":"The biggest coastal city in Belgium provides some of the best surfing conditions, especially on either side of the harbour pier at low and mid tide. Needs the onshore winds to drive the swell and mushy close-outs are common but sometimes it lines up for a few faster walls. ","id":141},"surfers paradise":{"description":"Premier Belgian surf spot when N storm swells hit the sandbars. Usually accompanied by onshore winds, as the swell will disappear quickly if it switches offshore. ","id":142},"domburg":{"description":"The premier surfspot on Zeeland often has hollow and fast waves. The banks are shaped between wooden jetties, accept any swell direction and can handle quite a bit of onshore breeze, but it's best on a N swell and light E wind at higher tides. ","id":143},"slufter":{"description":"With the construction of Maasvlakte 2 (expanding the port of Rotterdam with 2,000 hectares) most of the current surf spots are vanished under the Maasvlakte 2. The Blokken no longer exists.","id":144},"scheveningen nord":{"description":"Most well know spot in Holland, is a stretch of small jettys flanked by a huge harbour wall that gives SW wind protection and a paddling out channel. Often lacks in power and closes out, therefore a lot of longboarders. Picks up all swell directions and breaks through the tide but best on a NW at high.","id":145},"zandvoort to katwijk":{"description":"Wide open beaches with soft crumblers that can reform and break harder on the inside. SW swells are best and pushing tide around mid. ","id":146},"bergen aan zee":{"description":"nth of town","id":147},"norderney":{"description":"After a stormy day, when the wind direction turns quickly from westerly to easterly it can be excellent for a couple of hours.","id":155},"borkum":{"description":"Similar conditions to Norderney with long stretches of unstabilised beach and higher tides needed to bring the waves over the shallow outside sand bars. ","id":156},"st peter ording":{"description":"Sandbar peaks","id":157},"sylt":{"description":"A kink in the shoreline shapes some long lefts and a shorter righthander over sand covered boulders. During a big NW or SW swell, there's cover ups to be had. ","id":158},"hvide sande":{"description":"Long, exposed west-facing beach with jetty for limited protection from N winds. Onshore mushburgers are the norm, but if wind switches NE after a storm, nice peeling walls will appear. Best on a NW swell without the wind. ","id":159},"nørre vorupør":{"description":"A long jetty provides protection and stability for longer, lefts to form on the north side. Handles onshore winds from the SW and W, but is best on easterlies. 300m north of the pier lies Deadmans, gets hollow and is  probably the most powerfull break in Denmark. Needs light or SE winds and a clean W swell.  The south side can get lined up and hollow when the winds are E with a headhigh swell, or in strong NE wind.","id":160},"klitmøller":{"description":"The North Sea's most famous kite and windsurf spot also gets some decent rides on the mussel encrusted reef when winds die or go E. Longer lefts with a whackable wall, plus some peeling rights. WSW swells are best as Klitmoller is on one of the few bends in the coast and has some protection from SW winds. There's a weak beachbreak inside the bay for beginners. Getting waves depends on the wind being too weak to keep the sail crew out there.","id":161},"steamer lane":{"description":"Straight out from the access stairs and extending out and west towards the channel are several reefs, collectively called Middle Peak, then subdivided into First, Second, and Third reefs. Best during N-NW swells, each reef works at a different size, but each boast heavy elevator drops followed by a softer righthand shoulder. The lefts, however, are usually steeper and hollower, but they can leave you caught inside by the next set coming in off the Slot or the Point. Middle Peak handles any size, although it becomes more challenging to read the line-up as the peaks shift around, keeping the pack on the move. ","id":163},"exmouth":{"description":"This forecast will give local winds but channel swell data. Be aware that there may be west or south west swell coming up the channel but it won\\\\\\\\\\\\\\'t reach here. You need to look out for east or south swells for this area (hence the ratings will not always be correct).","id":164},"sidmouth (lyme bay)":{"description":"Exmouth, Sidmouth and Lyme Regis all get waves in huge SW swells and E Channel swells. Never big or powerful, but some decent set-ups for the committed. Same is true of the protected beach at Weymouth, round the back of the Isle of Portland, which is rumoured to have some reefs, but is cliffy and surrounded by treacherous waters. ","id":165},"perranporth (droskyn)":{"description":"The main town beach. Beachbreak peaks better at low tide with the highlight being a long left breaking underneath Droskyn Point if the river has shaped the sandbar. Backwash at high tide.","id":166},"vazon bay - beach - guernsey":{"description":"Mellow, beginner-friendly beachbreak in the north of the bay, rights being favoured. ","id":167},"meñakoz":{"description":"World-class, highly dangerous big-wave spot.  One of the most powerful regularly-surfed waves in Europe.  Starts breaking properly at about 12 foot.  Hazards include razor-sharp rocks, very strong rips, shifting peaks, two-wave hold-downs, broken boards and broken bones.  ","id":168},"orrua":{"description":"Short, fairly poor quality semi-closeout beachbreak near the harbour wall.  More swell gets in here at low tide. Moderately consistent spot. ","id":170},"zurriola":{"description":"Consistent, medium-quality beachbreak that can have good peaks depending on the sandbars. A lefthander peels towards the pier at low tide. Best on small swells; anything over about 5' closes out. ","id":171},"playa de meron":{"description":"Consistent beachbreak with multiple peaks, giving fast walls and the occasional cover-up. Smaller towards western end, where a rivermouth shapes up the banks and there’s better W wind protection. ","id":172},"los locos":{"description":"Excellent, consistent, west-facing beachbreak. Works during most tides and is sheltered from summer NE sea breezes by high cliffs. ","id":173},"playa de somo":{"description":"Consistent beachbreak with good peaks, working during most tides.  Best on small to medium swells.  ","id":174},"el brusco":{"description":"Excellent-quality hollow beachbreak with A-frame peaks.  Needs fair sized swell to work. Best at high tide.  The stronger the offshore wind the better.  ","id":175},"tapia de casariego":{"description":"Good-quality, consistent beachbreak with semi-permanent, hollow lefthander, fed by a stream. Best mid to low tide, outgoing. Some shelter from NE sea breezes in summer, but it is a year-round wave. ","id":176},"salinas y espartal":{"description":"Stretching from Playa El Espartal to Salinas, this is one of the most popular surfing beaches in Asturias. Fast, barrelling, consistent beachbreak peaks, working during all tides. Smaller towards western end.  Some shelter from summer NE sea breeze. ","id":177},"rodiles":{"description":"The best wave in Asturias. A world-class rivermouth lefthander similar to Mundaka but slightly shorter and handles less size. Two hours either side of low, preferably on the push. Needs a moderate swell to get going, usually best in winter. ","id":178},"patos":{"description":"Good quality left and righthand reefbreak. Fairly short rides with some barrel sections. Needs large NW swell and mid to high tide to get going. SW wind OK. ","id":179},"playa de traba":{"description":"Medium-quality beachbreak with several possible peaks, depending on highly changeable sandbars. Strong rips. ","id":180},"campelo":{"description":"Challenging, walled-up beachbreak, with regular barrel sections. Very consistent, even on small swells, when low to mid tide is best. ","id":181},"foz":{"description":"Excellent quality rivermouth left only breaks on the biggest swells of the year.  It’s fast, hollow and shallow and doesn't hold above about 8 ft. Low tide only.","id":182},"barbate":{"description":"An immense wave with the correct conditions. The sandbar is set into place by the seawall creating a classic lefthand rivermouth wave. Needs a solid swell and low tide to produce long, barrelling lefts with heavy currents guarenteed. ","id":183},"cadiz":{"description":"In between two rock groynes, this beach works best on bigger swells. If El Palmar and the surrounding west-facing beaches are maxed out and the winds are howling, this is always a good option. Although not the best wave in the area, there are some whackable walls and the local surfing standard is high. Bad backwash at high tide. ","id":184},"yerbabuena":{"description":"A classic lefthander in solid swells and N winds. Steep, barreling take-off wrapping into long playful walls. Big swells can close out the bay, making it difficult to stay in position on the left. Very tight take-off zone but there's other waves in the bay.","id":186},"afife":{"description":"Afife has been likened to Supertubos but without the crowds. Consistent and very fast, hollow peaks spit surfers out of barrels all over the place. SW swell and low to mid tide is best - the southern end is usually bigger. ","id":187},"viana do castelo":{"description":"Beautiful Cabedelo beach is reached by ferry from town and is worth checking on a decent NW swell when the jetty can provide some hollow sheltered waves. On smaller days take a look right down at the southern end of the beach. ","id":188},"aguçadoura":{"description":"A seemingly endless stretch of beach that gathers any swell going, but is easily maxed out. Different banks work at different stages of the tide and when the conditions are good it would be hard to go wrong here. ","id":189},"leça":{"description":"The harbour helps to shape up good sand bars and if it’s flat here then its flat everywhere. An extremely consistent wave, but few takers. ","id":190},"espinho":{"description":"The best known surf spot in north Portugal breaks off a jetty and runs through to the inside as a fast, walled up right that finally dies as a close out over shallow rocks. Plenty of tubing moments with swells of up to 3m+ (10ft). ","id":191},"praia de mira":{"description":"Wind exposed sandbar waves that hold little swell. High tide is better and offers steeper shore break style waves whereas at low tide the waves mush out on sandbars a hundred metres offshore.","id":192},"cabedelo":{"description":"Just to the south of Figueira town and an ex-WCT contest site. This excellent right wedges off the side of a long jetty and results in fast and hollow waves. NW winds are funnelled offshore and it works best on a NW swell and incoming tide. ","id":193},"nazaré":{"description":"People are only just beginning to wake up to the potential of Nazaré. A finger of deep water points directly at the beach to the north of town and the result is similar to La Nord in Hossegor. Huge, heavy and hollow beach peaks for the brave. ","id":194},"lagide":{"description":"The best spot on the north side of town is this consistent left hand reef break that is offshore with a S wind. It’s a mellow but long ride and crowds are certain. Low tide is sharp and shallow and high tide a little bouncy.","id":195},"supertubos":{"description":"The name speaks for itself! World-class spot and undoubtedly the best beachbreak in Portugal, Supertubos has become a favourite stop on the world pro tour and a perfect warm-up for Pipeline. Long, heavy, gas-filled tubes are guaranteed as well as a few shut-down close-outs, such is the speed of this wave. The lefts are usually better, but plenty of shorter rights peel off the main peak, especially in NW conditions. It’s at its best with NE winds, a decent SW swell and mid-tide, but these conditions don’t come around everyday. ","id":196},"ericeira":{"description":"Another spot that won’t win any awards for its quality but when the swell is too much for everywhere else, then Furnas will have some rights off the breakwall and shifty peaks. ","id":198},"praia do guincho":{"description":"Better known for its windsurfing conditions Praia Gunicho is actually one of the better beachbreaks in the Lisbon area and certainly one of the most consistent. When it’s good, wedgy, powerful rights break off the cliffs at the northern end. Mid-low tide on a NW swell is better, but it gets blown out very easily. ","id":199},"lisbon/estoril":{"description":"A sectioney and uncrowded righthander that holds big swells as well as gathering up the best of the smaller days along the Costa Estoril. It breaks off a jetty and is exposed to W winds, but is usually fairly quiet. ","id":200},"malhão":{"description":"The most consistent wave in the area can be found on this long beach whose decent sandbars are broken up by several huge rocks. It breaks throughout the tide and, though a poplar spot, there are more than enough waves to go around.","id":202},"playa de janubio":{"description":"The west-facing beach/reef breaks of El Golfo and Playa de Janubio are so exposed to swell and strong currents that they are usually too dangerous to surf. The ultra hollow, sucky reefs may look inviting but the reality is they are usually unmakeable. Rips are strong and the line-up is disorganised – avoid.","id":204},"playa de la canteria":{"description":"A small sandy bay nestled beneath cliffs at the northern tip of the island. From mid to high tide a peak breaks in the centre of the bay over a sand bottom. At high tide this becomes a more defined left. Also at high tide on the eastern side of the bay a righthander can peel down the rocks giving a fast and sometimes hollow ride. Swells over 6ft tend to close-out the bay. ","id":205},"jameos del agua":{"description":"Mainly a left point but on the biggest and cleanest of swells a solid right can also be found at the very end of the point. N swells wrap around the headland, lining up sectioney walls and shoulders that lack a bit of power, however on classic days, it’s definitely the longest wave on the island. Better at higher tides. ","id":206},"ghost town":{"description":"A hollow right breaking in a small bay. It takes only a few surfers here to make a crowd but numbers are often low due to the fierce nature of the wave. Powerful and fast breaking in very shallow water with a distinct take off spot.","id":208},"playa de famara":{"description":"6 kms of curving beach that receives swell from W-N and handles wind from SW-E. Centre of the bay receives the most of the swell, but the sandbanks will close out at around 8-10ft faces. North end can get fast and hollow at lower tide while south end is smaller and easier. ","id":209},"playa de la pared":{"description":"Off the tourist track beach with average peaks and good NW swell exposure. Best early morning before N winds destroy it.","id":210},"las salinas":{"description":"A few times a year when big NW swells max out the north coast, Salinas starts working. An excellent right that's fast, hollow and very shallow at low tide.","id":211},"east coast":{"description":null,"id":212},"bristol":{"description":"Punchy, hollow reef inside bay protected from W winds. Prefers NE swells and is far less dangerous at higher tides. ","id":213},"bajo del medio":{"description":"When the north coast is maxed-out on big swells, a peak breaks out in the bay off Correlejo. Starts outside as a big, bombora style, right shoulder, but inside there's a faster and shallower left. Long rides, deeper water and easy paddle-outs make Rocky Point perfect for intermediates and longboarders. ","id":214},"vagabundo":{"description":"Summertime spot that works when everything is flat. Won't handle much size and the banks are rarely fast or hollow. ","id":215},"arguineguin":{"description":"Arguineguin has a few different breaks that work in big W swells and N to E winds. La Derecha Misteriosa is a fun, high tide right breaking off the north end of the bay at the marina. South of town, the playa holds a boulder right in front of the football pitch and a left towards the cement factory at low to mid.  Long rides, good for practising manouvers and accessible for all levels.","id":216},"los enanos":{"description":"One of the most popular beachbreaks in summertime when everything is flat. Defined lefts at the west end with easy, whackable walls. Good vibes and friendly locals. Super consistent and often a spread-out crowd. Located at the refreshingly undeveloped Playa de San Andres.","id":217},"la cicer":{"description":"The most popular surfing area in Gran Canaria. Plenty of crowded, performance peaks, (El Piti Point, El Bufo, Los Muellitos) rideable 365 days a year. Suitable for every type of surfcraft and ability from local pros to beginners. Dawn patrols highly recommended.","id":218},"el confital":{"description":"Considered one of the best righthanders in Europe, thanks to it’s wedging barrels and fast walls. Localism remains but not as heavy as years ago. Venue for the WQS circuit.","id":219},"la izquierda del muelle":{"description":"A very well known spot in front of the old harbour in Arinaga. Low swell frequency but high quality on the good days. A long left breaks over a slab reef producing good barrels in NE winds and swell. There's also a right across the bay. ","id":220},"derecha del faro":{"description":"Located in Maspalomas, Gran Canaria´s favourite beach resort, this spot rarely offers good conditions but a few times a year it gets epic. Massive W swells will create a very long righthander with over 5 different sections. Good sloping walls for performance surfing. More shorter peaks either side of the lighthouse.","id":221},"la fitenia":{"description":"Popular peak with range of moods from small cutback shoulders to big bowls and racy walls. Needs any S swell to work and the rights are usually better. ","id":222},"la izquierda / spanish left":{"description":"Famous left in Playa de Las Americas that breaks over a lava platform and spins down the line for up to 100m. Sucky and hollow on take-off leading into a smackable wall with cover-up sections. Despite the name there are also some short rights. ","id":223},"punta blanca - k16":{"description":"Top class reef peak that quickly closes out on the right leaving bowly lefts to rifle down the reef. Intense jacking take-offs, dominated by local bodyboarders and tube masters. Short, shallow and scary – experts only. Best with a wrapping NW-NE swell. ","id":224},"playa del socorro":{"description":"This NW-facing, rocky beachbreak sucks up any N swell and holds good size. Powerful and a gruelling paddle when bigger coupled with strong rips. E winds are OK as there are high cliffs behind the beach. ","id":225},"los dos hermanos":{"description":"North coast bombie-style reef that catches all N swells and creates big throaty barrels. The rights are usually better but it needs a medium swell to start breaking properly and it will handle some chunky size.  ","id":226},"eland's bay":{"description":"Eland’s Bay hamlet sits on a sandy riverbank, waiting for a swell to hit The Point. Steep drops into fast tubular walls, spinning across a kelp covered, low tide reef before bending into a sandy end section at the rivermouth. ","id":227},"stillbay":{"description":"To the west of Mossel Bay is Jongensfontein, a small SE swell reefbreak for when it’s too wee for the likes of Stillbay’s sharky but epic righthand pointbreak. Huge SW swells will halve in size by the time they have wrapped into the bay, but it is rocky, sectiony and a gruelling rip pushes down the point. ","id":228},"victoria bay":{"description":"Around George are a couple of quality breaks like Victoria Bay, a popular right pointbreak zipping over the rocky headland beneath steep cliffs in a pocket bay. ","id":229},"buffels bay":{"description":"There’s an inconsistent point that fires in SE swells, plus some fun beachbreaks but the pick of the pack is Murphy’s reef and sand peak. ","id":230},"mzimpuni":{"description":"Further north, Mzimpuni’s large bay complete with big S-SE swell righthand pointbreak, is close to the small swell, beachbreaks peaks of Mbotyi.","id":232},"briech":{"description":"A consistent, wind sensitive, beach that’s best at mid to high tide. Nearby Asilah hosts another long, open beachbreak to the north of the port. ","id":244},"mehdya plage":{"description":"First surfed in 1964 when a board reached the nearby US military base, this is the cradle of surfing in Morocco. The powerful Moone righthander breaking along the south jetty is the most reliable spot, sheltered from northerlies and able to handle size. There’s also surf in Chlihat, past the north jetty, and even in the rivermouth when it’s big enough to get Charatane’s left going. The town beachbreaks are a good summer bet. ","id":245},"rabat":{"description":"Across the Hassan II bridge in Rabat opposite the large Oudayas Surf Club, Kbeir is a short and powerful left, that is good with smaller swells. Cascade is another left outside the jetty, while Plongeoir breaks on the river side. Bergama is just at the rivermouth.","id":246},"oued cherrat":{"description":"A beachbreak with patches of reef that favours rights. Sucks in the small swells and handles a bit of onshore W. ","id":247},"dar bouazza":{"description":"With enough swell and S winds, the most famous left in the country wraps around a point offering cut-back sections rather than a wackable wall. Decent length from take-off at L’Inter to the final section with the ship boiler called La Bobine. ","id":248},"jack beach":{"description":"Long, sandy beach that picks-up a lot of swell but is exposed to the wind. ","id":249},"el oualidia":{"description":"Since 1991, a surfcamp has been teaching local kids to surf the easy waves inside the lagoon. The open beach is often blown-out or out of control, but Les Tomates will appeal to the experienced surfers. ","id":250},"safi":{"description":"Safi’s “Garden” remained semi-secret for a long time, with those in the know understandably protective of the long, ultra-fast, throaty barrels that fire down the point north of Safi. Unfortunately, it is very fickle, only breaking in big swells at low tide. There are more rights in the area under similar conditions. ","id":251},"boilers":{"description":"Just south of the lighthouse of Cap Rhir, a washed-up ship boiler gives its name to this consistent and powerful righthander. Vertical lips and speed walls are held up by funnelling trade winds, bouncing off the hills. ","id":252},"agadir":{"description":"Swell always struggles to get into the northern part of Agadir’s large bay and the beachbreak sucks anyway. ","id":254},"ocean beach":{"description":"Three miles of some of the best and heaviest beachbreak on the planet, similar to Mexico’s Puerto Escondido. Simply called “The Beach” by locals, it picks up all swells and can hold virtually any size — as it gets bigger, it just breaks further out and becomes nearly impossible to paddle through. A dropping tide increases the hollowness, but the random, shifting peaks remain makeable. ","id":255},"davenport landing":{"description":"To the south is a popular, fun, lefthand reef wave best during S swells and medium-low tides. Some tube sections and lots of boils. Gets very crowded with surfers on glassy mornings, crowded with kite- and windsurfers on windy afternoons. There is also a mushy righthand reef/point at the north end of the cove, to the right of the restrooms. Needs lower tides and NW swell bigger than chest high.","id":256},"four mile":{"description":"Crowded, high-quality pointbreak rights. Fast and hollow over the inside shelf. NW winds blow offshore here, making it a popular spot on windy days. Can work on all tides, but medium-low works best. ","id":257},"manresa beach":{"description":"A broad section of excellent and consistent beachbreak that’s particularly popular due to the convenient parking lot. The surf can be good (or at least fun) here when the Santa Cruz town spots are flat. Peaks and channels, some current and shorepound action. Typically closes out at a few feet overhead. Medium to high tide with no wind on a peaky, broken-up swell are the primo conditions. Big swell window.","id":258},"moss landing":{"description":"Excellent, extremely powerful sandbars produce some of California’s best beachbreak waves, always bigger than anywhere else inside the bay. The Monterey Bay Submarine Canyon funnels swell directly into the beach, so waves are fast-moving and thick, a showcase of quality shape and heavy barrels. NW swells and medium-high incoming tides preferred. Offshore with SE storm winds. The surf down by the jetty is usually smaller than to the north, but is also the most crowded.","id":259},"andrew molera state park":{"description":"Fast, thin righthand lines at the Big Sur Rivermouth; blows offshore with the prevailing NW wind, so it’s a good call on swell days that are blown-out elsewhere. Needs a bigger W or S swell and lower tides to eliminate backwash. Semi-point set-up. Shallow gravel bottom. Beautiful spot. ","id":260},"cambria":{"description":"A long righthand reef wave requiring big winter swells to break. Some sections, lots of boils, and not too hollow. Easy paddle out. Good when it’s on; check here when everywhere else is maxed out. The local boys will be on it.","id":261},"morro bay":{"description":"Good, powerful beachbreak when big; fast and fun when small. Long, mushy lefts off the Rock. This consistent and reliable, W-facing swell-catcher attracts a crowd, however there’s lots of room northward to spread out. Can be good on any tide. The entrance to Morro Bay can produce some waves in larger swells and the South Jetty beachbreaks are popular during smaller swells.","id":262},"saint annes":{"description":null,"id":263},"oceano/pismo":{"description":"Miles of beachbreak, wide open to wind and swell. Breaks further out the bigger it gets; the inside reforms are surfed when the outer bars are closing out. Can be rather mushy due the gradually sloping bottom contours. Best during the summer or on small, clean winter swells. High tides work best. Lots of room; crowds are never a factor.","id":264},"jalama beach county park":{"description":"Chunky, shifty beachbreak waves in front of the campground and to the south (known as “Cracks”). Best with smaller, peaky swells, no wind and high tide. Very popular spot with Santa Barbara surfers and windsurfers. Further south down the beach, the peak at Tarantulas (or T’s) is triggered by a rock reef, producing an excellent left peeling into a channel and a decent right racing towards inshore rocks. Jalama catches most available swell, but it’s best in the cold morning offshores, since the wind absolutely rips most afternoons.","id":265},"the ranch - cojo reef":{"description":null,"id":266},"beavers/hazards":{"description":"A pocket beach just east of Refugio, clearly visible from the highway. Somewhat mediocre peaks, usually not very good, but it can get fun during windswells. Can’t really handle anything over head high. Rock and sand bottom. Needs a low tide; high tide creates backwash. The peak at the east end offers decent, fat, mushy lefts and shorter, hollower rights. Various peaks to the east as well. The peak at the west end is a lined-up right with lots of rock boils. Sectiony and rather mushy but well worth it if the east peak is crowded, which it often is due to the easy drive-by surf check.","id":267},"sands beach":{"description":"A consistent, wide beach west of Isla Vista; usually has something to ride. The rocky area in front of the bluff and bike rack is known as Stu Peak because many UCSB students surf there. Best with a higher tide and peaky windswell. Gets very crowded. Some dangerous rock hazards, especially during low tide. Lots of students on the beach on sunny, warm days. Over toward the slough mouth, sandbars replace rocks, and it can get good and quite hollow. Needs peaky windswells and medium-high incoming tide here too. Low tides create rip currents and close-outs. Blows offshore with a SE storm wind.","id":268},"campus point":{"description":"Inconsistent right point next to UCSB requiring big W swell. Excellent quality when it breaks correctly. Handles as big a swell as the ocean can provide, the bigger the better. Fast, hollow sections and long rides when it’s on; mushy, slow, and weak when it’s not. The inner peak is called Poles and is popular with grommets and longboarders. Lower tides are generally best. Always crowded with students.","id":269},"leadbetter beach":{"description":"Mushy, gentle, long rights off a scenic point boasting great views of the Santa Barbara Harbor and Stearns Wharf. Ideal for beginners and longboarders. Can be really fun with bigger W swells or large windswells. More sectiony and lined-up at low tide, fatter at high tide. Surfers of all abilities crowd the line-up here, but it’s almost always all longboards. Good vibes despite the crowding.","id":270},"hammonds reef":{"description":"Classic righthand cobblestone reefbreak in the wealthy town of Montecito. Occasional lefts. Well-shaped, lined-up wave with a few punchy sections. Holds considerable size and always offers classic rides on a good day. Medium tides with clean W swells work best here. Big S swells also get in, creating a welcome respite to long, flat Santa Barbara summers.","id":271},"rincon point":{"description":"World-famous, consistent, and classic. A long, perfect righthand point, usually very lined-up with several tube sections. Rides are possible from the very top of the point (above the rivermouth) all the way to the highway, but the swell has to be big enough and of the proper direction (W-NW) not to section off. Rincon can be good at all tides, but low provides the most hollow sections. The inner cove is generally a mushier, softer wave popular with longboarders, but it too can be screaming fast on the right day.","id":272},"hobson county park":{"description":"Fun cobblestone reef peaks; good with any swell and tide. S swells get in here, but the spot is generally best with winter juice. Long, fast lefts off the north peak. Long, sectiony mushy rights off the south peak, which closes out onto an inner sandbar. ","id":273},"pitas point/faria county park":{"description":"Long righthand cobblestone and rock point hosting several more or less distinct breaks. Requires big W swells and can be the best spot on the coast when it’s happening. Lots of room for everyone. Separate take-off areas range from Outsides (fast, hollow waves with power off the outer point) to Insides (slow, mushy longboard waves). A variety of mushy peaks inside the bay spread out into unbelievably slow-moving waves. There is also a left breaking north of Outsides. Sheltered from the prevailing NW wind. Handles any tide except extreme high.","id":274},"california street (c street)":{"description":"Also known as Ventura Point, a very long right point with several take-off zones. Stables is on the very tip of the point, more consistent and usually bigger than the rest of the point. Fairgrounds is the outer point when the swell is under 8ft (2.5m), breaking with power and speed in front of the Ventura County Fairgrounds. Over 8ft (2.5m) and Outsides breaks on an outer reef right next to a deep paddling channel, up to 12ft (3.6m). Cobblestone and sand bottom. Insides is rather mushy but long and forgiving and can develop great big peaks with rights and a few lefts. Popular with longboarders. Very reliable spot and usually crowded. Paddling out can be difficult during swells over 6ft (2m). Can be good at all tides with all swells.","id":275},"silver strand":{"description":"Flanked by the Channel Islands Harbor south jetty and the Port Hueneme north jetty, this popular mile-long stretch of powerful beachbreak is often seen (but not identified) in surf magazines and videos. Always gets some kind of surf with epic barrels during the wintertime, it takes a S nicely too.","id":276},"county line/yerba buena beach":{"description":"Popular, scenic spot with two surfable areas. The rocky north end of County Line is called The Point, mainly rights, though some good lefts are occasionally dished up. Very fun and usually crowded. Kept fairly glassy at all times by thick outside kelp beds. Medium tides work best here, especially on a W swell up to a few feet overhead. To the south is the beachbreak, various peaks lined up on outer reefs, which can get hollow and punchy. Popular with shortboarders. Can be good at anytime.","id":277},"secos":{"description":null,"id":278},"malibu - first point":{"description":"One of the world’s most famous and most crowded righthand pointbreaks. Mainly a summertime spot best on S swells. Three separate take-off zones: Third Point: at medium tide, fast, hollow rides off the northernmost point. Big swells will connect up with Second Point: long, hollow, workable wall at medium tide, unmakeable at low. First Point: the most consistent and therefore the most surfed of the Malibu waves. Can show perfect shape, excellent for any type of surf craft. Works through the full tidal range, getting more hollow as the tide drops.","id":279},"santa monica municipal pier":{"description":"Mellow, mushy sandbar peaks on the south side. Mostly rights up to about head-high with low tide. Never gets big and is somewhat polluted. Best with W-SW swells.","id":280}," manhattan beach ":{"description":"Access is at the foot of Manhattan Beach Boulevard; metered parking nearby.","id":281},"haggertys":{"description":"Access is via a trail in the 500 block of Paseo del Mar at Via Chino, leading to the southern end of Malaga Cove.","id":282},"lunada bay":{"description":"Famous big-wave reef infamous for nasty localism and thick, world-class righthanders. One of the few bona fide Southern California big-wave spots. Needs big W-NW swells and any tide. Perfect shape and very powerful with strong currents to match. A horseshoe-shaped bay. Starts at 6ft (2m) and never closes out. Rocky and unfriendly. ","id":283},"cabrillo point":{"description":"Quality right point requiring large S swells to work. Long rides are possible; can be either fat or fast, depending on the tide. Can get really good.","id":284},"seal beach pier":{"description":"Average beachbreak peaks on both sides of the pier. Doesn’t have the form of the peak at 13th Street, nor can it handle anywhere near the same size. ","id":285},"huntington pier":{"description":"Check out the Huntington Pier area for a deep hit of Southern California surf culture. One of the world’s most famous surf spots, site of many contests and a lot of history over the years, HB is predictably jammed, especially during the summer. The north side can handle big winter swells, sending often excellent rights peeling towards the pier. The south side works best on SW swells, showcasing frequently good lefts that wall right through the barnacle-encrusted pilings (this is the spot that made “shooting the pier” famous). Both sides can work at any tide, though medium is usually best. Check further north for peaks where the service ramp hits the beach, also around the terminus of Golden West Street.","id":286},"the wedge":{"description":"Only an hour’s drive from J-Bay, Plettenberg Bay is a convenient area with services and accommodation to suit all needs. With eight spots in the area, there should be something for everyone, outside of the summer tourist high season. From the rivermouth to Beacon Island, there is 4km (1,3mi) of spots, the most spectacular being the Wedge lefts, only breaking on a rare easterly swell.","id":1148},"morro beach":{"description":"Rocky, fast left off a small headland, requiring S swells and a medium tide. Not a very long wave but provides a rush. A summer spot, ridden regularly.","id":288},"salt creek":{"description":"A small, rocky point and a long, sandy beach frequently seen in surf magazines and videos. Three classic surfing areas. In front of the restrooms is Middles, a consistent peak that can get good on any swell -– sand and rock bottom, very competitive crowd.","id":289},"san clemente pier":{"description":"Crowded, mediocre sandbars on the pier’s north side can sometimes get good. Typical beachbreak peaks, longer lefts, sectiony and often hollow. No wind protection, but any tide is fine. ","id":290},"trestles":{"description":"An often stellar cobblestone peak, Lowers provides occasional hollow, zippering lefts, but is more known for its long, fast, bowling rights. Best with SW swells up to double-overhead. Can be good at any tide.","id":291},"carlsbad":{"description":"Stretch of mundane beachbreak, best with small, peaky swells and no wind; higher tides best. Rarely crowded and occasionally quite good, though it will mostly likely be better elsewhere.","id":292},"swamis":{"description":"Located down the long staircase below the Self-Realization Fellowship’s small parking lot. Check it from the road south of the break.","id":293},"solana beach":{"description":null,"id":294},"torrey pines/blacks beach":{"description":"Also known as Torrey Pines City Beach, this is a famous, high-quality half-mile stretch of beachbreak, known for its consistency and power. Usually the biggest spot around. The La Jolla Submarine Canyon funnels swells directly into Blacks, which features three distinct spots: South Peak, a heavy, perfect left; Middle Peak, a two-way affair with the lefts usually being better, and North Peak, a brief but exciting righthand barrel. Blacks holds huge swells, but be prepared for lots of severe rip currents, sneaker sets, and long hold-downs. Very painful if you get caught inside. Gets very crowded.","id":295},"scripps pier/la jolla":{"description":"Wide sandy beach with peaks breaking on both sides of the pier, the south side usually being better. The Shores, fronting the parking areas to the south, can be excellent. Best with a medium tide; blows offshore during rare wintertime SE winds.","id":296},"mission beach (san diego)":{"description":"A mile of mundane beachbreak from Santa Rita Place to the Mission Bay entrance channel. Only surfable when small, clean and peaky at high tide. South Jetty at the south end of the beach can get good, with shorter rights ending in a channel and longer lefts with a harder paddle back out. Gets crowded.","id":297},"south beach":{"description":null,"id":976},"klamath river":{"description":"A wicked, heavy righthand sandbar barrel with its own miniature ecosystem in the water and a huge pinniped rookery on land. Sealife galore, making it the easiest place around to get attacked by a shark, as a few surfers will testify. Usually ridden during clean swells from chest high to a few feet overhead. Incoming tide. Mainly a summer and autumn spot, though autumn is the sharkiest time of year due to salmon runs. The currents and the shorepound are severe.","id":299},"patricks point":{"description":"This deep-water left is rocky, bumpy, mushy, huge, powerful, long, and mean. It holds swells as big as the biggest Mavericks, which says a lot about Humboldt’s most popular big-wave spot. Winter-only, Patricks is  sheltered from S winds. Although definitely not a user-friendly place, it’s very beautiful. Waves slam into the outer boils and rumble on through more boulders to the inside, where a potent peak exists: Agate Beach, which is a sandbar with a few lethal submerged boulders of its own. Very hollow and steep, Agate snaps boards like toothpicks. A winter break, it’s good during low tides, SE winds, and larger W swells. ","id":300},"moonstone beach":{"description":"Another popular spot just down the beach from Camel Rock. A wide, flat-bottomed beachbreak with plenty of room for everyone. High tide, no wind, with a small, clean swell from any direction; can either be a saggy mushburger or snappy tubes with speed to burn. ","id":301},"eureka":{"description":null,"id":302},"virgin creek":{"description":"The most surfed break in the Fort Bragg vicinity offers quality peaks over a soft, sandy bottom; a small cove with wedgy rights peeling into a channel. Rocks on the inside and quite sharky. The lefts usually section more. ","id":303},"point arena":{"description":"Easily one of the best spots north of San Francisco, found off Port Road at the south end of the Point Arena township. When conditions are prime on the north side of the pier, you’ll find a steep, hollow, ledging righthander with a thick wall roaring into the deep channel. Beware of the rusted ship’s boiler on the inside during low tide. Needs at least a clean, head high swell (the bigger the better) to break, with an incoming tide. When it’s smaller, the wave peels dangerously close to the inside ledge. The paddle-out is through a keyhole in the rock ledges near shore. There’s also a good left breaking to the south of the pier, best at about head high and offering some punchy sections in front of the exposed rock shelf. N wind blows sideshore/offshore at both the point and the left, but forget about it on a S wind.","id":304},"secrets":{"description":null,"id":305},"salmon creek":{"description":"The most popular surf spot in the county; meaty beachbreak resembling San Francisco’s Ocean Beach in terms of size and consistency. Getting out can be difficult, but, if you’re lucky, you can find a natural paddling channel. Heavy sandbar peaks are the norm at Salmon, which gets crowded but usually offers room for all. Rarely flat, so you can surf it all summer long. ","id":306},"marin county":{"description":"Various sandbar peaks with profuse backwash and funky currents. Not a stellar break. Occasionally a decent right rebounds off the cliff. Regularly surfed, but essentially a summertime spot. Semi-sheltered from N wind. ","id":307},"la push":{"description":"A small, relatively sheltered cove at the end of La Push Road. (Route 110) about 15 miles from Highway 101. Sand and gravel at the mouth of the Quillayute River (La Push comes from la bouche or ‘the mouth’) creates several distinct, fat peaks on the outside with reform sections working into the beachbreak. Mid tides, all swells from S to NW. James Island, the rugged mass that frames the north side of the cove, jumbles up a full N swell — try the beachbreak on the north side of the rivermouth for some clean winter barrels.","id":308},"long beach":{"description":"Long Beach is a dumpy, erratic beachbreak facing SE that is a favourite with bodyboarders as it sometimes holds banging barrels close to shore. Early mornings on a clean, small to moderate SE swell will look good from the cliffs.","id":2218},"cannon beach":{"description":"Portland’s favorite vacation playground, Cannon Beach is an increasingly upscale tourist town offering only marginal beachbreak and breathtaking sunsets as backdrop to the overdeveloped shoreline. Can get good mornings and evenings or on small, glassy days.","id":313},"smugglers cove":{"description":" Free parking at Oswald State Park (use the second lot near the restrooms and interpretive kiosk). The trail down to the beach begins near the highway overpass. There’s a campground just up from the beach. Proximity to Portland, wind protection, scenery, and campground facilities make this spot frequently crowded, especially on summer weekends. Even so, the vibe is generally good, and this is one of the few ‘beach scenes’ in Oregon. Caution: Thieves work the parking lot, especially summertime; take precautions.","id":314},"cape lookout":{"description":"Oregon has two ‘legendary’ spots. Seaside Point is the left, this is the right. A solid cobble and table rock reef near the protruding headland hosts a classic righthander when conditions are perfect. Best on a W swell. Outside kelp beds help smooth things out too. Just about the cleanest and clearest water in Oregon. Otherwise, most of the action is beachbreak, much like anywhere else in Oregon, but conveniently windshadowed by the longest cape on the coast. Sometimes a good left breaks into the channel between the beachbreak and the point. Blows out on S wind. The north side has nice beachbreak too, which is naturally sheltered from winter S winds.","id":315},"lincoln city":{"description":"South of D River is the area known as Canyons, named after the little county beach park, just over the hill from the factory outlet stores on Hwy 101. The main break is left of the parking lot, about a 100-yard walk down the beach.  Mostly good lefts but some rights.  Like all Lincoln City spots, hollower at low tide, mushier at high.","id":316},"otter rock":{"description":"Somewhat sheltered from summer NW winds by Cape Foulweather, Otter Rock is popular with beginners and longboarders. Several mushy, soft-rolling beachbreak peaks are open to most swells but best on a small W. Occasional snap on the inside under exceptional conditions. Can get good on a small S summer swell. Experiences a lot of rips along the rocks in the winter and early spring, which can work like a ski lift. Sometimes gets a good peak towards the Cape serving up good lefts and rights.","id":317},"newport":{"description":"Over the Yaquina River bridge south of Newport, South Beach offers miles of typical beachbreak with predominant lefts, best in W swells and lower tides. ","id":318},"winchester bay":{"description":"Despite the fact that this spot is visible from Highway 101 (check it from the overlook at the top of the hill just south of Winchester Bay), and the beach is public, you might encounter the odd ugly local. Grin and bear it. Relatively major shark hazard here.","id":319},"coos bay":{"description":"South of the dunes and moated by a complex system of bays and estuaries, the North Bend/Coos Bay area is the epicenter of surfing in south-central Oregon, thanks to a complex system of rocky headlands and coves leading out to Cape Arago. First stop on the Cape Arago Highway is the popular Bastendorff Beach, a wide, sandy cove flanked by Yoakam Head and the south jetty at the entrance to Coos Bay. Offshore on winter S winds, the various peaks are loosely divided into spots like South End, Gray Houses, Middles, Crappers (a.k.a. Shitters), and North End. All tides except extreme high and low. Rips at point or jetty ends, depending on swell direction. There are several regularly-surfed spots further out on the Cape, including Simpson’s Reef, which one regular describes as “a hard-breaking, rocky-climb-down-the-bluff, time-your-entry, sucking wave right inside the largest concentrated sea-mammal haulout in the Pacific Northwest.”","id":320},"gold beach":{"description":"Long stretch of exposed beachbreak, but the short south jetty of the Rogue River offers shelter from the N wind and some excellent sandbar rights and lefts. Heavy currents. Expect competition in the line-up from a gang of seals that ride the place regularly. Watch out for interesting and sometimes classic left-breaking spot (called Little Joes or Between the Jetties) inside the jetties on strong W swells at lower tides. A couple miles down the beach, check out the beachbreak at South Park or (further still) the reefs and sandbars around Hunter Creek, which can all work when a clean, long-period swell and offshores coincide. ","id":321},"brookings":{"description":"Protected from prevailing NW summer winds by the Chetco River Jetty, this popular Brookings spot is a rare summertime haven. Takes anything from a NW to a S swell, which produce two-way peaks that break over a sand bottom on most any tide. A nice beachbreak, greatly enhanced by E and NE winds. Good fun at a foot or two, it’ll handle surf up to about 8ft (2.5m). Good beginner spot, although, as with other NW rivermouths, sharks are a concern.","id":322},"vancouver island south (jordan river)":{"description":"Historically a logging camp, River Jordan has become a surfing town thanks to long wrapping rights known as The Point, Sewers, and Rock Piles, but it has also developed a reputation for intolerant, aggressive locals. Despite being somewhat inconsistent, these waves crank when it’s on, which is mid-winter, big W-NW swell and a NE wind. The Point at the rivermouth can have very long rides (and some lefts back into the river), down the line speed walls and bowly barrel sections over the sand boulder mix. ","id":323},"vancouver island north (long beach)":{"description":"Long Beach is actually a series of beaches stretching for over 10km (6mi), where usually mellow waves provide an endless choice for the many surf schools that operate on this stretch. Closes-out when the waves get overhead and there can be some currents and rips, especially around Incinerator Rock.","id":324},"punta blanca":{"description":"Punta Blanca is one of the series of seven major points known as the Seven Sisters. It’s a fine right climb and drop pointbreak for able surfers, working best on a SW-W swell, offshore-ish in NW and is definitely among those requiring a 4WD. ","id":325},"playa elefante":{"description":"A big island like Isla Cedros seems attractive but it’s really windy and breaks like Playa Elefante are only of medium quality. ","id":326},"punta negra":{"description":"Located near Piriapolis.","id":3735},"cerritos":{"description":"Longboarders love Cerritos, where NW swells wrap nicely down the headland at all tides and the beach peaks offer something for all abilities. Cerritos Beach Club and Surf has rentals and food and the whole stretch is earmarked for development with condos, hotels, golf courses etc. ","id":328},"costa azul":{"description":"Hollow beach break, on classic days it looks like Supertubes(Peniche, Portugal).","id":3880},"hammerhead":{"description":"Surf camps and schools have proliferated in the last ten years and even a remote offshore island surf break like Hammerhead can be surfed from surf charters leaving from Nuevo Vallarta. ","id":330},"las islitas":{"description":"The Guinness Book of Records certifies Las Islitas as the longest wave in the world, covering 5,700ft (2250m), as it wraps into Matanchen Bay. It’s a mellow wall with occasional tubing sections and if you can still feel your legs at the end, make the long walk back to the point. Unfortunately new constructions mean it hardly ever breaks and only a huge S swell will do, along with a very long board.","id":331},"punta sayulita":{"description":"Punta Sayulita’s good wave reputation has lead to the place turning into a mini surf city. The reefs are mellow and ideally suited to beginners and longboarders. ","id":332},"pascuales":{"description":"Bombing black sand beachbreak that can be every bit as intimidating as big Puerto Escondido. Pascuales rears up any S swell from deep water and bludgeons the beach with deceptively powerful peaks that constantly shift and shut down the paddling channel that was there a minute ago. Handles the big stuff when the local chargers and camping devotees crack out the pintails and play roulette. Smaller swells can be picture perfect, but over-subscribed to and humour is hard to find in this town where the morning session is the only entertainment. Take a spare board.","id":333},"rio nexpa":{"description":"Barra de Nexpa palapas (beach huts) face the long, tubing lefts of Rio Nexpa, a crowded rivermouth setup. Low to mid tide and due S swell can link all the sections making for hi speed rides over the boulders and sand. There can be much shorter and consequently less crowded rights off the peak, which break back into the rivermouth, especially if the swell is more W. The lefts can handle plenty of size and even NW wind, but get some strong currents and will dish out some poundings to the unwary.","id":334},"petacalco":{"description":"The long, intense righthand barrels could be counted among the planet’s best surf, but expansion of the neighbouring port of Lázaro Cárdenas turned the wave into an ugly closeout. Petacalco has recently risen from the ashes and is now rideable on huge NW swells, but better on due S. Always powerful at any size but the sandbar shape is crucial and close-outs are the rule. ","id":335},"the ranch":{"description":"With no accommodation available in El Capire, The Ranch remained a secret for many years. Today surfers staying in nearby resorts regularly drive or boat up here to enjoy very consistent rights and lefts on either side of a headland plus a rivermouth that hold up to double overhead. ","id":336},"las gatas":{"description":"Playa las Gatas is a tiny beach is reached after a long walk, paddle, or a boat ride from the municipal pier. The left there needs a good amount of SW-NW swell to break over a man-made reef, but there doesn’t seem to be an upper size limit. Hollow, fast and dominated by dialled in locals. ","id":337},"playa boca chica":{"description":"Playa Boca Chica is a consistent beachbreak surfable year round, and probably your last option before reaching Acapulco. Caca’s Point is the only surfable spot within the Bay of Acapulco, otherwise there’s more surf at Copa Cabana. ","id":338},"acapulco":{"description":null,"id":339},"puerto escondido":{"description":"Swells hit the Puerto Escondido sandbars at Zicatela Beach in such a way that the waves jack up in size, which is often emphasised by a backwash. Magazine photos of this place are misleading - the waves close-out often and the paddle-out can be severe. Usually the rights break best. The wave is fickle, and will often be blown out by 11am. There’s large numbers of skilled surfers in the water hoping for the bomb that stays open long enough to escape. Despite all this, it’s still a year-round Mecca for big barrel hunters!","id":340},"la bocana":{"description":"The Rio Grande bocana (rivermouth) sculpts the sand into long, hollow lefts and short, sharp rights but it needs a decent size swell and higher tides. Localism hotspot. total respect required.","id":927},"lawrencetown":{"description":"The popular Lawrencetown Beach is one mile in length and faces south, producing uninspiring beach peaks up to 5ft (1.5m). Lawrencetown Left Point only breaks well 5-10 days/year, when winter or spring swells combine with W to NE winds. Really tubular and breaking close to the rocks, it has to be one of the heaviest spots around. ","id":342},"western head":{"description":"Western Head Point is, a heavy and dangerous left, breaking over large rocks. ","id":343},"main beach":{"description":null,"id":344},"jacksonville beach":{"description":"On a N/NE swell, this pier can produce long lefts on the south side, with plenty of shorter rights as well. This is the opposite on the north side, which is generally less crowded. Very consistent on higher tides with occasional barrels and good shape.  ","id":345},"st. augustine":{"description":"North of Blowhole, where the sand dunes build up, is the locals’ favorite low tide spot. These bowly horseshoe peaks break both ways, giving super-hollow and long lefts on a N/NE swell.","id":346},"flagler pier":{"description":null,"id":347},"playa linda":{"description":"In Ixtapa, Playa Linda is usually mushy but the rivermouth can produce long left walls as the wave reels into a sandy lagoon. There’s a ferry to Ixtapa Island, where there's rumours of a zipping right","id":2061},"cocoa beach":{"description":null,"id":350},"melbourne beach":{"description":"Ocean Ave has average peaks over outside sandbars at lower tides. ","id":351},"sebastian inlet":{"description":"This outside bank on the south side of the inlet is aptly named. What brings the multitudes of anglers also attracts the sharks making the 200yd paddle seem longer. However, fortune favors the brave when a decent N/NE swell hits at low tide incoming. Long walled-up lefts with good shape and power plus a few bonus rights that break back towards the inlet. Works on all tides, but incoming from low is easier to deal with rip-wise. It’s important to note that the outgoing tide from the inlet will continue to run out into the line-up for an hour and a half after low tide on the beach, making it a constant paddle against the fast current. Not the place to lose your board! Exposed to the wind, and the jetskiers are all over it when it’s small.","id":352},"stuart beach":{"description":null,"id":353},"jupiter inlet":{"description":"This quality spot has a nice inside peak on all smaller swells and an outside left on bigger swells. Lower tides are best, and the jetty offers decent protection from northerly winds.","id":354},"reef road":{"description":"Reef Road is Florida’s undisputed best big-wave spot. Located off one of the most expensive oceanfront real estate strips in the world, this high-class lefthander can produce powerful, sucky rides for up to 400 yards. Needs an overhead N to NE swell to start breaking, then it gets better as it gets bigger. It will handle as big as Florida gets, which attracts big-wave aficionados from all over, especially in hurricane season or the depths of winter. Best at low tide incoming, when it breaks over a coquina reef outside then a shallow sandbar inside. Nearer to the south jetty of the Palm Beach Inlet, known as The Cove, there are less critical lefts and the occasional right, which offers more wind protection. Access to the north side of the inlet is also sketchy, so we won’t bother describing the decent waves that break near the sand-pumping house at the base of the north jetty in the exclusive suburb of Palm Beach Shores.","id":355},"palm beach":{"description":null,"id":356},"deerfield beach":{"description":"Best on a windchop SE with a low-incoming tide for above-average pier, sandbar peaks. NE swells don’t line-up very well.","id":357},"haulover":{"description":"Good sandbars can form around the jetties and the pier. Lefts and rights along this stretch take N/NE swells and SE windchop and prefer lower tides. From here south into Miami, the beachbreaks become pretty marginal and most Lauderdale surfers drive to get their waves.","id":358},"octagon":{"description":null,"id":360},"bob hall pier":{"description":"With direct access from Corpus Christi and consistent waves, Bob Hall Pier is the number one scene of the “coastal bend” area. It gets real good and can hold some size, but crowds are a given, no matter what the conditions are like. ","id":361},"higgins beach":{"description":"Higgins is well protected from N winds, but consequently doesn’t receive any swell from the north either. Handles decent size, particularly if it’s a SE swell, which can make for some shapely and powerful peaks. Stops breaking either side of high tide.","id":362},"fortunes rocks":{"description":"Pounding, sucky beachbreaks that crash close to shore on a high tide. Short, hollow rides with thick lips that’ll pummel the careless.","id":363},"kennebunk beach":{"description":"Although it faces almost due south, a NE swell still manages to wrap around Cape Arundel, which is a bonus if the wind is also NE, making it dead offshore for Kennebunk. Needs at least 3ft (?m) to start breaking, but it’ll handle as big as it gets. Big, brown, heavy, smokin’ lefts and rights with critical drops, especially on a low incoming tide.","id":364},"ogunquit river":{"description":"The focal point of Maine’s surfing scene for decades, this rivermouth right has the potential to provide quality rides in various conditions. A SE groundswell with a WNW wind on an incoming tide from low create the primo conditions, however the shifting sand in the flow of the rivermouth is the real quality controller. Very finicky these days, since they dredged the river to build up the beach dunes, resulting in sand being pushed back into the river from the break. The huge currents also play their part in sweeping the sand around. When it does break well, it starts from in front of the rocks and peels fast across the rivermouth onto the inside banks, where zippery walls and barrel sections can be found. A shorter left reforms and breaks into the river flow and is consistent on smaller swells.","id":365},"short sands":{"description":"Short Sands is short on swell direction options, but when a decent NE swell hits, this is one of the most powerful beachbreaks in Maine. It used to be a high tide only spot, but the sand is very susceptible to change, and it could be working at any stage of tide. Refraction off the surrounding rocks causes a real wedgy peak to jack up, giving short rights and longer barreling lefts into the beach. A difficult wave that always punishes the unwary.","id":366},"long sands":{"description":"Long Sands, as the name suggests, is a wide open west-facing beach that’s well protected from the wind by its northern headland, Cape Neddick. Plenty of peaks to choose from, which never get top-to-bottom but can peel off fast. Great for longboards or beginners.","id":367},"rye rocks":{"description":"Referred to as Bass Beach on most maps, this wave is one of New Hampshire’s favorites. Drastic changes to the wave’s personality occur throughout the tide, and size will determine whether you get a long, workable wall (when it’s bigger) or a fat shoulder (when it’s smaller). High tide is generally a slow cutback fest, while either side of dead low transforms Rye into a ledgy, growling, hollow pit that demands skilled take-offs. Mid tide will combine the above conditions. Too much N in the swell won’t do it any favors, but E or SE will get it firing.","id":368},"the wall":{"description":"Punta Rosarito is so consistent, it has earned the nickname of The Wall, but winds, even if offshore, can get too strong to surf these powerful west-facing reefs. Plenty of camping among the rock wall windbreaks.","id":767},"cape ann":{"description":"Probably the most powerful beachbreak in northern Massachusetts, Long Beach consistently attracts the maximum available swell and magnifies it onto the low tide sandbanks. The southern corner has a hollow left breaking into the rocks, which is less likely to close-out than the rest of the beach.","id":370},"nantasket beach":{"description":"The curve of this long beach catches the full swell window because the southern end faces NE and the northern end almost faces SE. This means SW to NW winds will be offshore depending which end you’re at. All tides are possible although dead high will do it no favors. Optimum conditions would be W winds, a NE groundswell, and 4 hours before high to produce longer rides from further outside, which can be fast, steep, and hollow, then slow, fat, and mushy, along various sections of the wave all the way to the beach. Best described as a variety pack.","id":371},"scituate":{"description":"A long left pointbreak over boulders on the south side of Scituate Harbor. Easy and slow outside, a little steeper and occasionally hollow inside. Miserable at high tide, but it will handle maximum swell along with some nearby rare but good spots. A SE swell will sneak around Cape Cod, but a due north tends to march right past. NW wind and a big E swell on a low incoming tide is the go.","id":372},"cape cod":{"description":"The Marconi Station area has good beachbreak peaks at the base of tall cliffs and dunes. Needs some NE or SE swell angle to provide the hollowest, gnarliest pits on the Cape. Will accept SW winds but not high tide. From here to Nausett Beach has the potential to handle triple overhead on a sandbar, way out from the usual low tide break.","id":373},"ruggles":{"description":"At the end of Ruggles Ave. a series of reefs line a point in the rocky coastline. Regular Ruggles is The Point, Bobbies and Stupid Spot in the middle, and Around the Corner at the end. All are rights except for a short left off The Point in a SW swell. A quality wave in large swells when it can link up long and strong without being really hollow. A SE swell hits dead on, but lower tides with NW winds are needed for Ruggles to live up to its reputation.","id":374},"monahan's dock":{"description":"State Pier #5, Tuckers Dock, or Monahans Dock are all used to describe this rock construction. The submerged reef peak has some crumblier lefts, which occasionally produce, but the rights are where the good stuff happens. Low tide, top-to-bottom, thick barrels with a critical take-off right in front of the dock. High tide is an easier take-off walling into a bowly end section. The dock claims plenty of boards and bodies that don’t make the wave. Some other reefs in the vicinity are equally powerful and dangerous, such as Rincon, Pigs, and 40 MPH. Handles everything. Experts only.","id":375},"matunuck":{"description":"This concentrated area of quality waves is one of the focal points of Rhode Island surfing. Three main peaks start with Deep Hole to the east, Trestles in the middle, and The Point to the west. Deep Hole is essentially only a left that is fast and sectiony at low tide. Trestles, like its California cousin, is a shapely peak with hollower rights and down-the-line lefts at lower tides. The Point is a peak with a short, bowly right and a long workable left, which can link into The Bar at higher tides, making for a long wave to practice cutbacks. All these waves break over cobblestone/boulder reefs, and they all handle good size. High tide still has good shape, but it makes the walls slower and fatter. Swell-wise, SE makes The Point line up, E is best for Trestles and Deep Hole, but they all still work on a due S.","id":377},"north bar":{"description":"Optimum swell is an E or a big SE to wrap around the north side of Montauk Pt.  It will be offshore in a SW wind when everything else is blown-out. Rights only, with fast down-the-line sections that don’t get hollow and rarely link up.","id":378},"fortress":{"description":"A submerged reef of boulders makes for some fun, walled-up sections. Favors rights on a SE swell at all tides, but won’t handle much size.","id":379},"fire island":{"description":"This notorious but pristine barrier island stretches for 30 miles (?km) with one access point, at the eastern end. 4WD is a must to explore the endless breaks that can get hollow and powerful. NW is offshore and it will break on all tides, but low incoming is best. Optimum swell direction depends on which part of the island you’re at, but it generally breaks on all swells.","id":380},"robert moses state park":{"description":"On the curved end of Fire Island, this State Park has the easiest access and parking in the city area. Broken into 4 fields, the most easterly lot picks up the most swell, while the western end faces more south meaning it will be smaller but the curve of the beach can line up the lefts quite well. The middle lots can throw-up a nice mid tide shorey, where it usually breaks close to the beach with hollow thumping sections unless the swell is up, when an outer sandbar will hold the ever-shifting goods.","id":381},"lido beach":{"description":"This due south facing stretch of beach needs a N wind and a SE swell to be at its best. Low to mid tide will have the hollowest waves.","id":382},"rockaway":{"description":"The closest surfing beach to NYC, the crowds are more challenging here than the waves. Average beachbreaks that need a sizable swell to make it in here with big E swells bringing some decent lefts.","id":384},"the cove":{"description":"The Cove at Sandy Hook picks up and handles swell from all directions. Better than 1st Parking Lot, a natural point here creates mainly rights and occasional short lefts when the wide section breaks. Low to mid tide on a southerly swell is going to provide longer right walls on a bigger swell. The lower the tide, the higher the quality.","id":385},"manasquan":{"description":"A S/SE swell, a W wind, and the bigger the better for this famous jewel of Joisey. Deep water leading to the inlet, a beefy jetty and good sandbars conspire to provide long barreling righthanders. Low to mid and closer to the beach if it’s smaller, when the tall jetty will provide some protection in a southerly wind. Will handle whatever the Atlantic can throw at it without shutting down. People have been known to paddle out the inlet in huge conditions. Generally regarded as the best wave in Jersey, this grinding board-snapper regularly gets as good as the photos. There are also good waves off the shorter jetties further up the beach.","id":386},"casino pier":{"description":"One of the premier waves in NJ, breaking either side of a huge pier, which hosts a roller coaster, mini-golf course, plus all sorts of family amusement and fairground-style attractions. Picks up just about any swell, which will break on a low tide bar right in front of the pier. Fast, hollow rights and lefts squeeze past the end pylons and can grind on down the beach in bigger swells. At higher tides on a NE swell, the south side will have a high-performance, bowly right, breaking back into the pier. This is mirrored by a less intense left on the north side in a southerly swell. The wide mass of tight pylons offers excellent onshore or sideshore wind protection.","id":387},"surf city":{"description":"The closest stretch of beach to the only causeway connecting L.B.I to the mainland. Accepts any swell direction but rarely produces anything other than an average beachbreak at lower tides.","id":388},"holyoke":{"description":"Limited residential roadside parking, which the police patrol heavily. Tags loosely enforced by lenient lifeguards who surf.","id":389},"states avenue":{"description":"Also known as Gas Chambers, this is Atlantic City’s premier wave. Between the old Gardens Pier and the steel Pier, very powerful, top-to-bottom peaks will break close to the beach on a SE swell at low to mid tide. ","id":390},"ocean city, nj":{"description":"The sand build-up here provides a steep sucky left from a critical take-off point just in front of the end of the jetty down towards the next groin at 8th Street. Handles the big NE swells, but a S swell doesn’t work on the north side of the jetty.","id":391},"wildwood":{"description":"Most of the sand from the rest of Jersey’s beach-nourishment program ends up on this 5mile (8km) resort stretch. All swells and tides, with high not being a problem due to the volume of sand. The U.S. Coast Guard owns the island’s prime surfing real estate.","id":392},"stockton":{"description":"This is the pick of the Cape May south-facing beaches. Incoming tide on an overhead swell usually means barrels, unless they have recently pumped sand.","id":393},"indian river":{"description":"Breaks way out producing long, rolling walls that stand up on the inside section. Very popular playground for longboarders. Gets big without becoming heavy.","id":394},"ocean city, md":{"description":null,"id":395},"virginia beach":{"description":"Classic example of average East Coast pier surf, warts and all. More rights than lefts on both sides because the winter nor’easters provide a right breaking back towards the pier on the south side. Any W in the wind for offshore conditions plus the side/onshore protection offered by the pylons on the rare occasions you can surf near the pier.","id":396},"kill devil hills":{"description":null,"id":397},"s turns":{"description":null,"id":398},"cape hatteras":{"description":"This famous break in front of the tallest lighthouse in the US (recently moved a few hundred feet back from the surf) is constantly changing from the heavy erosion at Cape Hatteras. Picks up most swells, NE being the best to line up the longer lefts. The ends of the battered jetties can get dredgy, but it all depends on where the sand is. Barrels one week, mushy the next. All tides, but best on low incoming.","id":399},"bogue pier":{"description":"This seasonally crowded pier provides easy access to above average waves. Picks up swell from the E, right around to SW and any N in the wind will be offshore. ","id":400},"topsail island":{"description":"Topsail Island encompasses Topsail Beach, Surf City and Del Mar Beach to the north. This long stretch of shifting beachbreaks is always changing, so flexibility and lots of surf checks are required. Somewhere is always working at a particular tide, subject to swell direction. Adjacent to the piers is usually best, so check the Topsail Beach Pier (S), The One Eyed Pier (central) and Atlantic Pier (N). ","id":401},"crystal pier":{"description":"This popular consistent pier surf area will accept the north to south swell window and all tides. Best on an incoming tide up to 8ft (2.6m).  ","id":402},"pelican watch":{"description":"In front of a hotel/motel by the same name, the sandbars here seem to be improving in recent years. Takes all swells and tides but needs some angle in the swell to keep it from closing out. Breaks hard and close to shore. This popular spot picks up smaller swells. ","id":403},"dunes cove":{"description":"Probably the best break in Myrtle Beach, just out front of the Dunes Country Club. The swash here creates a definite sandbar, which breaks both ways into the rivermouth, giving longer rights on a SE swell. A hollow, top-to-bottom punchy wave. ","id":404},"garden city pier":{"description":"Best on a S/SE swell on all tides except high outgoing. Average crumbly pier surf.  ","id":405},"the washout":{"description":null,"id":406},"hunting island":{"description":"This pristine beach is rapidly disappearing as the ocean is now making it into the sub-tropical forest at high tide. Either side of high tide, walled up peaks will appear, offering occasional barrels when it’s offshore. The area in front of the lighthouse, which had to be moved due to the erosion, is generally best.  ","id":407},"comfort inn/jekyll island":{"description":"Gutless is the word to best describe these typical Georgia beachbreaks. High tide only. Bring a longboard. ","id":408},"la bahia (guayas)":{"description":"La Bahia is well exposed with a great left by the rocks but again you will have to wait for the ideal conditions. There are a few other breaks N of Salinas that catch reasonable sized N swells. ","id":409},"montañita":{"description":"Montañita itself is Ecuador’s main surf break and is identified by a phallic shaped rock. It catches any N and S swells, holding up to 10ft (3m) sets and it’s a juicy right even when it’s only 2ft (0.5m). This world class wave is usually crowded and has become something of a surf centre where it’s possible to get cheap, decent accommodation. ","id":410},"murcielago (manta)":{"description":"Ecuador’s surf city is Manta, full of bodyboarders who bust out some big moves on the hollow waves of Murcielago beach break. ","id":411},"cabo blanco":{"description":"Unfortunately it is an extremely crowded wave (9/10) these days, attracting Peru's best surfers and the atmosphere can become aggressive. It’s also inconsistent (4/10), only breaking from Nov-March with any regularity and the challenging barrel is obviously for experts only. ","id":413},"negritos":{"description":"The town beach can hold some nice triangular sandbars at La Brea with some fun corners amongst the close-out barrels. Takes all swells but faces west so you will need to head towards the southern headland at Balconies or maybe up at the huge concrete pier at Puerto Negritos for wind protection. The left point at Punta Balconies is usually messy and ill defined but there can be some protected left walls amongst the minefield of rocks.","id":414},"puerto eten":{"description":"Puerto Eten also has a long, busted-up pier, with mushy beachbreak stretching to the north and some more interesting peaks anchored to the rocks just south of the pier. The best wave is the left point found below the lighthouse (Punta La Farola) in the next bay, when SW swells wrap onto the rocks and wall up nicely for a few hundred metres.  ","id":415},"chicama":{"description":"Chicama is to be found halfway between Lima and the border of Ecuador. The landscape around Chicama is extremely arid, the water is unusually cold and sea fog often shrouds the extensive line-up. Ask any surf traveller where the longest wave in the world is and the answer is invariably Chicama. The actual distance between the furthest take-off point and the fishing jetty where the wave ends is 4km (2.5 mi), although to be fair no one has actually ridden it for that distance. On good days most people end up catching 3-5 different waves on a journey down the point, surfing through 4 defined breaks and using the constant current to drift down to the next take-off point. Furthest out on the tip is El Cape aka Malpaso, which is always the biggest, but not necessarily the best. It draws off a cluster of rocks and starts fast and sucky before hitting the sandier shallows inside the point and backing off into what will become a familiar scene - long sections of slightly tapered, lip-feathering walls that demand a repetitive approach of drive, lip bash, float and snap until a temporary shoulder gives respite for a roundhouse or two. It's the place to go in small conditions, as it picks up W swell better, but cops more wind, plus it is rockier and breaks all tides. It's a neat but unmakeable kilometre to the next spot on El Cape called Keys, where a crop of black rocks signals a defined launch spot into what can be a racy wall with barrel potential, provided the swell is moderate to strong, when it can transport you up to three-quarters of the way towards the main point, 800m away. Keys provides the best protection from any S wind and the proximity of the cliffs help also. It's soft when small and prefers mid to high tide to help hold up the sections. Chicama's main break is El Point and is easy to identify as the biggest protrusion from the long line of the cape. This is where most surfers try to start their sessions, making the 20+min walk from town. The exposed rocks make a good marker in this faceless line-up and the wave starts off fast with some hollower, close-out sections to keep everyone on their toes, but quickly settles into an ideal tempo that peels like it was designed in a laboratory. Foam-climb re-entries are a useful weapon to keep up if caught behind and will help negotiate the longest makeable stretch of Chicama that spins for 1.1kms before reaching the last El Hombre section. Located in front of a swathe of beachfront hotels (including the famous El Hombre), this is the place where you are most likely to get barrelled as the swell hits a clump of rocks and sandbanks, then speeds up on its way to the pier. It also means it can be greatly affected by sand flow and swell direction, often only working for short, but intense sections. If on a big swell it is all aligned then there is another 800m sprint to play for, if your jelly-legs will allow. It's a good idea to kick out well before the pier as the sweep can take you into the danger zone of pylons and swirling currents. Lower tides favour the 2 end sections and they are better oriented for E-SE or even rare NE winds, but such is the angle of refraction and the scale of the headland that even SW winds are doable closer to the cliffs in a cross-shore sense and SE-S will be fine. Sometimes the wind is so strong it will blow the waves to shreds and you over the back, if you can see through the sand storm. Wave height rarely reaches double overhead with a 12ft swell barely producing overhead conditions at El Point. The 15ft face height upper limit is rarely , if ever reached and the current of Rio Chicama would be so strong, jet ski assist would probably be needed. ","id":416},"punta huanchaco":{"description":"Another place worth checking out is Huanchaco, home of the Totora reed Caballito riders, maybe the world’s first surfers. Fishermen have been riding the lefts back to shore at this spot for the last 2000 years. For today’s surfer it offers easy and super-consistent waves, as it is very exposed to all swells. There are no cliffs on the headland, making it more of a reefbreak style set-up and more open to being blown out. From the tip to past the long pier is a good 800m, but it hardly ever links up, preferring to peak and wall in a disorganised fashion, with some nice punchy hooks and corners linking the flatter trundling walls. All the various sections have names like La Posa and Sunset, plus there are some waves on the north side of the pier including a rare but welcome righthander. ","id":417},"el silencio":{"description":"The cove at El Silencio has a rocky reef inside the northern headland where a variable right will break in moderate S or better still W-NW swells. Inconsistent and often disorganised, the rights can be sucky over the sharp boulders before fattening out on the shoulder then shutting down on the sandier inside. There are some lefts at the southern end and also around the headland back towards Pulpos at La Timba.","id":418},"pico alto":{"description":"Also cover Senoritas, Caballeros and Playa Norte","id":419},"santa rosa":{"description":"Furthest north of a string of longer lefthanders and occasional short rights that run down this San Bartolo headland when the swell picks up from the W. At size it is an angry stretch of water, standing up hard from take-off and offering a further tube section before shutting down mercilessly on the boulder strewn beach.The paddle-out is tricky and the currents get motoring on big days. NW will open up the rights and fast, juicy walls are the available for a short distance. Mid tide is safest but it will break through depending on tide and swell range.","id":420},"playa cavancha (iquique)":{"description":"Playa Cavancha is the main city beach, which is usually just a big closeout, but in winter and on windswells with a bit of W or N in them there will be a few corners for beginners and cruisers. Around Punta Cavancha are some more reefbreaks and then the small swell beachbreaks of Playa Brava and Huayquique that are usually too big to surf and blown out. ","id":421},"el tojo viejo (arica)":{"description":"With a larger swell, those willing to spice things up may want to measure themselves by the treacherous Tojo Viejo, an intense left breaking on the western tip of the peninsula. It’s only ridden when over 6ft (2m) with a south swell direction and good days are rare. ","id":422},"ritoque":{"description":"Surfing started in Chile in the early '70s around Ritoque, which has powerful and super consistent beachbreaks that are clean on N winds. The north end has a defined left next to the paddling channel that flanks the headland and makes getting out the back a breeze. The walled rights off the peak lead into the rips and close-outs that characterise the centre and south end, where wave height usually increases. Looks inviting when smooth or groomed at lower tides and the lefts can be mellow and shouldery enough for beginners to get in on the action.","id":423},"cartagena":{"description":"Cartagena is a busy summer resort that has a long stretch of nondescript beachbreak that leads north to a cove called Las Cruces. When the sand builds up a good left can start at the southern headland and zip across the bay. Often just a mushy closeout, at least it has a bit of speed and is worth a look.","id":424},"la boquilla":{"description":"La Boquilla is a notable rivermouth wave, also with good lefts.  ","id":425},"matanzas":{"description":"Navidad and Matanzas are both shallow bays with mini headlands anchoring clumps of rock that really need the sand to join the dots and to create anything decent. Often disorganised with unmakeable sections, Matanzas has some outside and inside lefts that keep the small crowds happy as long as it is below mid tide. Not as much S wind protection as many other points, making it popular with wind/kitesurfers.","id":426},"pichilemu":{"description":"Pichilemu, first surfed in 1983, quickly became a popular destination with surf travellers, because of the concentration of seemingly endless pointbreaks and a laid-back atmosphere in the small coastal town. Pichilemu has grown massively in the last decade and is now a popular summer resort for Chileans from Santiago. Meanwhile, the kilometre-long line-up of La Puntilla has treated many to the longest rides in the country, provided the sand is cooperating and linking it all up. This is a rare occurrence and most will find loping, sloping walls, barging down the point for triple figure sections inviting down the line scribes and hacks back to the power source in equal measure. The paddle-out is exhausting against the drift and many elect to walk after a long one. Gets unruly at size, but will still hold up through the deep channel in the bay.","id":427},"joaquina":{"description":"World famous Joaquina beach provided classic conditions for a 1986 ASP world tour contest. It’s a thick, powerful beach break that favours lefts, making it more than popular. ","id":429},"garopaba":{"description":null,"id":431},"rosa":{"description":null,"id":432},"pitangueiras":{"description":"Also covers Pernambuco and many of the Sau Paulo breaks","id":433},"maresias":{"description":"Maresia is one of the most popular surf spots in the area and the beach of choice for São Paulo's most beautiful people, with 4k’s (2.5mi) of clean sand and clear water with some good consistent beach peaks. There are also a few reefs here, a good one can be found at Canto do Moreira. Sometimes the beach peaks here can really turn on the goods and produce epic waves. If it gets big, then the little fishing village of Pauba has some decent waves. ","id":434},"gaibu":{"description":"Although the Gaibu Peninsula is located inside the prohibited zone, the authorities have allowed the locals access to the surf and there have been no attacks so far. ","id":435},"maracaipe":{"description":"The most consistent beach in this zone is Maracaipe, which hosted the 2000 World Surfing Games. Although the middle of the beach is usually the best, there are dozens of other sand banks to choose from. The wave tends to roll through from outside banks reforming several times on its journey to the close-out shore break. High tide tends to be better but on the whole the wave quality is poor. ","id":436},"cacimba do padre":{"description":"Looking down from the mirantes (viewpoints), Cacimba do Padre appears as a picturesque tropical beach with perfect clean waves in crystal clear water, against the backdrop of the gnarled volcanic brothers known as the Dois Irmãoes. This is the most consistent spot on the island and the swell can be doubled in size here, reaching heights of up to 15ft (5m) offering huge, cavernous barrels, before shutting down hard on the fine-sand beach. With enough NW-N swell, it starts breaking on an outside shelf and rolls left through to the inside, getting meaner all the way. There are rights as well, but most of the action is concentrated on the longer, more makeable lefts. Smaller, peakier swells can see a high tide left, wedge off the base of the rocks, but no matter what the size, Cacimba is always hollow and powerful. ","id":437},"boldró":{"description":"Boldro is a hazardous reef with some very good lefts and rights that barrel when it’s small, but it gets a little crazy when the swell is over 6ft. Lower tides are needed to pull the waves off the rock shelf and swell direction will decide which side fires.","id":438},"punta roca":{"description":"Punta Roca is El Sal’s world-class pointbreak racing over shallow, black boulders in the town of La Libertad. Can get leg-achingly long on a medium S swell, with hollow, tubing sections popping up regularly. It’s a long paddle from in front of Bob Rotherham’s restaurant, but it by-passes the armed robbers who ambush surfers for their boards on the long walk out the point. It needs to be at least 3ft (1m) to break off the rocks, but it holds surf of up to 12ft (4m).","id":439},"el sunzal":{"description":"Zunzal seems to have waves every single day and makes the most of any S-W swell at lower tides. A big peak sucks up way outside (offering some lefts in due S swells) and then rumbles right for ages, offering fun walls and cutback shoulders. Super consistent and super popular with intermediates and longboarders. If it’s flat here, it’s flat everywhere!  ","id":440},"los cobanos":{"description":"The west-facing Los Cabanos beachbreaks, just near the polluted port town of Acajutla, pick up W swells and may hide a few reefs as well. ","id":441},"ollies point (potrero grande)":{"description":"While Oliver North is long gone, the name Ollie’s Point has stuck to this way above average righthand pointbreak. While an expensive boat trip from Playas del Coco is the only way in, it doesn’t deter the crowds who flock here in a big S or medium W swell to sample the plenty-long, ruler-edged walls perfect for thwacking and the cover-ups that section off at low tide. Ideal for dialing in some moves thanks to it’s predictability and forgiving nature which also applies to the nearby and nearly as good peaks behind Witches Rock on Playa Naranjo, which luckily works on higher tides. Access through the national park is only possible in the dry season and hazards include getting bogged, small crocs, small sharks and very large mosquitoes! ","id":442},"witches rock (playa naranjo)":{"description":"Next door,along the 6km of Playa Naranjo is another world-class wave. This hollow beachbreak faces a huge rock called Roca Bruja meaning Witches Rock, which was deposited in the sea by an angry volcano 50k’s (30mi) away. Ultra-fast, zippy walls streak down the sand, needing higher tides to prevent the close-outs. Most surfers coagulate just south of the rivermouth, but there are always more peaks to the south. North of the rivermouth is usually smaller. The only effective way to reach these spots is by boat from Playa del Coco or by 4X4, but like most national parks, there’s no accommodation so camping is the only possibility.","id":443},"tamarindo":{"description":"With a decent swell several good spots break in Tamarindo itself, including Estero’s consistent, fast rivermouth peaks, as well as smaller, beginner-friendly, straight-hander beachbreaks and several reef breaks like Pico Pequeño, Diria and Henry’s, all well situated for SW-NW swells, but always crowded when on.","id":444},"nosara":{"description":"The coast leading to Nosara is full of secret spots, only accessible in the dry season with a 4WD. Nosara is a bigger centre with some beach break lefts and some good lodging. For the more hardcore, nearby Playa Ostional can be a good place to stay, whilst further south still, potential spots can be found around Punta Guiones, the reefs here pick up any swell and can get big. Stay at Playa Guiones lodge or the campsite.","id":445},"pavones":{"description":"Insanely long lefts, sectioning down a sandy, cobblestone point, close to shore. Being buried deep in a bay makes it incredibly inconsistent, as only big S-SW swells will penetrate the Golfo Dulce. Modern swell forecasting means   plenty of surfers will be on hand when it does work and the expat crew are notorious for sewing up the best set waves and making it past the hollower low tide rivermouth section all the way down to the cantina where the breakneck speed lets up a bit. At high tide the La Esquina del Mar section starts breaking and occasionally the wave connects up, offering rides of up to a kilometre for those quick enough to beat the longer sections. ","id":446},"pan dulce":{"description":"If the S swell gets to a decent size, Pan Dulce becomes a Rincon-style right point, meaning really long, mellow cutback shoulders and zippy walls perfect for longboarding, often breaking as two separate sections on a rocky bottom inside the Golfo. ","id":447},"santa catalina - la punta":{"description":"Santa Catalina remained a cherished secret for years, but now has the reputation as one of the best waves in Central America, thanks to unrivalled reliability and year-round offshores. Swell pulling bathymetry sucks in S-SW where the peeling rights break almost every day, especially from April to October. The outside La Punta section attracts the biggest crowd, which gets dispersed down the long point, which works much better at high tide. The offshores get very strong in the afternoon. ","id":448},"emily's (morro negrito)":{"description":"Morro Negrito surf camp is close to 2 rocky lefthanders for competent surfers or better. Emily’s is right in front of the accommodation and peels over some sharp reef and barnacle encrusted rocks at variable speed flicking between whackable walls and a few tight tubes. 20 mins walk south is The Point that needs a sizable swell to build some fast, pitching lefts at lower tides.","id":449},"little malibu (rincon)":{"description":"Tucked into a bay is Little Malibu, which has small, fast, tubey rights over a shallow, fire coral reef. Half the size of Rincon breaks and packed with local bodyboarders who don’t have to worry about losing fins.","id":450},"crash boat":{"description":"Crash Boat is just on the south side of the jetty where bowly rights line-up over the sandy reef bottom. Higher tides and decent swell needed. Lots of aggressive local bodyboarders.","id":451},"dunes (puerto rico)":{"description":"Surfing in Puerto Rico has traditionally centred around Rincon, but today the area gets extremely busy. The standard of local surfing is high and the crowds have led most surf travellers to seek quieter spots further to the north, around Isabela. Dunes has many quality reefs that are usually crowd-free.","id":452},"le moule":{"description":"Grande-Terre consists of gently rolling scrubland and numerous sugar-cane fields. Le Moule, facing NE on the crescent-shaped coastline of Grande-Terre, is the main surfers hangout. Good exposure to N-E swells, it's the most consistent and crowded wave around. Normally this reef works as a 2-4ft (0.5-1.2m) onshore left with a juicy take-off right in front of the car park, plus there is a rideable beachbreak nearby. ","id":453},"petit havre":{"description":"The left at Petit-Havre is quality, attracting plenty of surfers from the capital, looking for ledgy barrels and some NE/E wind protection. ","id":454},"port louis (grande terre)":{"description":"Tucked behind a headland on the west coast is not ideal for consistency, but when the winter N swells wrap around Grande Terre, the triangulation of the reef north of pretty Souffleur Plage makes for a long point-style right and shorter faster, lefts. Soft, forgiving, evenly-paced walls taper and shoulder down the line for what can be a very long ride, especially when a bombing N swell can sometimes link up with the Pointe de Antigues section to the north. You won’t have it to yourself and everyone will be there when the forecast dictates, but the line-up handles a fairly large crew and there is lots of paddling to be done.","id":455},"soup bowl":{"description":"Famous east coast right, full of power and intensity. Vertical drops, thick bowls and big shut down sections that even work in the regular onshore trade winds. Kelly Slater puts Soup Bowl in his “top 3 waves in the world” thanks to it’s “really good curve that allows all sorts of manoeuvres and airs”. Winter N swells bring the heavy Bowls, while a hurricane S direction may provide the fun Soup part of the name, while still holding excellent shape. No matter what direction, this is a wave of consequence as it shifts up the size scale.","id":456},"south point - barbados":{"description":"At the bottom tip of the island, South Point offers long lefts over a live coral reef in front of the lighthouse. Breaks up into sections that may link up when big enough, the theme is long, fast left walls with cover-ups or shorter, bowly rights that catch the wind a bit more. Prefers mid to high tide, when it gets a bad backwash. ","id":457},"sandy lane":{"description":"Sandy Lane, mid-way down the island, is a short, perfect left, but it’s either fantastic, or totally flat. Lowest consistency around, meaning the locals will be out in force when it finally breaks. Backwash airs are all the rage. ","id":458},"duppies":{"description":"On the NW tip of the island is Duppies, a consistent, powerful right that suffers from strong currents. Probably the best wave on the island after Soupbowls, it is not for the faint hearted. It breaks some distance offshore, is reputed to be sharky, and the name refers to malevolent spirits and ghosts, so the vibe is heavy. ","id":459},"tilapa":{"description":"The beachbreak at Tilapa is easily accessed and is complimented by a rivermouth peak and an estuary. ","id":460},"sipacate":{"description":"Sipacate is all about quality beachbreak peaks, and with miles of beach available, it’s one of the best spots to catch some tube time when a peaky, head-high SW hits. Incoming tides and morning offshores complete the pretty picture and most surfers stay at the Rancho Carillo.","id":461},"puerto san josé":{"description":"Rapidly accessed from Guatemala City, Puerto San Jose is Guatemala’s most important seaside resort and as such, is the most surfed beach in the country. Take the boat across the Canal de Chiquimulilla to reach the grubby beach where average, all tide peaks break beside the pier. ","id":462},"pochomil":{"description":"Pochomil is a popular vacation spot only 1h drive from Managua. The main bay is beautiful, but the best peak, a slow, rolling A-frame, is to be found south of town. ","id":463},"manzanillo":{"description":null,"id":464},"playa maderas":{"description":"The beachbreak of Playa Madera is probably the best around San Juan. Very consistent, sometimes hollow, it hosted the first national contest in May 2002. Over the years, the fishing village of San Juan del Sur has become a cruise port and seaside resort, popular with Nicaraguan teenagers as much as gringo surfers. The surf isn’t very good within the city’s horseshoe-shaped bay, but many spots are accessible from here. ","id":465},"playa carmen":{"description":"Often referred to as Mal Pais, Playa Carmen is where most of the action happens, right where the Cobano Road meets the beach. ","id":466},"roca loca":{"description":"Roca Loca is a great right with occasional lefts on a good swell, but it’s a hike to get there. Take heed of the barely submerged rocks at low to mid tide. ","id":467},"playa bonita":{"description":"In April 1991, a 7.4 earthquake raised the coral reefs by 2-3ft (0.6-1m) and affected some of the Limón spots. Playa Bonita is the main beach in the area and features a chunky left reef at the north end which gets slamming hollow in a strong NE swell. It’s an easy base for checking the variety of local breaks between Portete and Piuta.","id":468},"salsa brava":{"description":"The road gets rough to Puerto Viejo, but is worth the hassle as it is home to the notorious Salsa Brava, a righthand reefbreak that can hold 12ft+ (4m). This fairly short, barreling wave with two distinct sections is consistent, heavy and crowds are the rule, especially from Dec to March. The outer reef, Long Shoal, has steep, fast take-offs into short shoulders, perfect for experienced surfers willing to make the long 3km/2mi paddle/boat ride to escape the SB crowd.","id":469},"silverbacks":{"description":"Bastimientos is home to 2 radically different breaks. Silverbacks is Bocas' big wave spot and it's the only right reefbreak in the zone. The ride is short, but the drops are long as the wave ledges up into a large barrel. Boards over 7' are recommended to surf this spot. It needs a good size swell to start breaking and will hold over 20 ft (6m). ","id":470},"punta palmar (san carlos)":{"description":"Bigger swells light up Punta Palmar’s fast powerful righthanders at high tide. The misleadingly named peaks of Hawaiisito (Little Hawaii) favour lefts, are readily accessible, but will not handle swell above head-high. There’s also a popular beachbreak between both points, which serves as a contest site, despite most waves tendency to closeout. ","id":471},"panamá la vieja (panama city)":{"description":"Panamá la Vieja is a rare case of “mudbreak” since most of the sand previously there was used for construction. Highway pilings block the swell and even on the biggest days with the biggest tide, it’s nothing but a mushy wave. ","id":472},"indicas":{"description":"Indicas may well be the best barrel in the Bahamas, forming stand-up tubes over a shallow, live coral reef. It’s a great left up to 6ft, before turning into the area’s proving grounds, holding up to double overhead. Juicy, left gem capable of holding the biggest winter swells that rear out of deep blue onto the coral platform. Needs to be headhigh to start working and really throws out some slabby tubes, but it’s fickle and needs the perfect swell direction to stay open and make-able.  There are also some lesser rights over a  sharp and hungry reef, best for those tuned into air drops and deep barrels. Hopetown’s best wave.","id":473},"egg island":{"description":"Long and thin, Eleuthera is under 2km (1.2mi) wide for 160km (100mi) of shoreline with pink-white beaches, sheltered coves and dramatic cliffs. The deep-water, bowling A-frame on the west side of Egg Island takes a good N swell to work, but is usually clean since the trades will blow offshore there. Ride a boat from Spanish Wells to check it out. ","id":474},"surfers beach":{"description":"Down the road from Gregory Town’s pineapple farm and small tourism hub, lies the 3km (2mi) long Surfer’s Beach. The long lefts that drew heaps of surfers to the area in the ‘70s will take any swell and some steep rights appear once in a while. It’s a fast wave with an intense inside section breaking over a sand bottom. ","id":475},"puerto plata":{"description":"The city’s other option, Coffee Break is a reef peak worth checking when it’s too small for La Puntilla. ","id":476},"la bahia":{"description":"Compared to the developed Puerto Plata, Sosua is a real jewel of a beach town with coconut trees lining idyllic beaches. On the biggest northern swells, peaks will appear in Sosua Bay, groomed by the offshore trades, creating a short, clean, sucky ride that’s best going left. Also check La Boca to the southwest.","id":477},"encuentro":{"description":"The treacherous peak at Coco Pipe is always less crowded since only experts can handle the heavy drop, barrel, get out quick sequence that the better rights demand. The whole Encuentro stretch usually gets blown-out by 10am in summer trades, yet winter can have plenty of glassy days.","id":478},"la preciosa":{"description":"Around the corner and a long paddle against the sweeping current, La Preciosa peak is known to get picture perfect, especially going left. Needs more size than Encuentro, but gets real good in a due N without the same crowd factor.  ","id":479},"cane garden bay":{"description":"Picture-perfect Caribbean dream wave that peels alluringly into the sunset-facing bay that is usually a haunt for chartered yachts. Appearances can be deceptive as the throaty barrels at the tip of the point hit the numerous coral heads, then race down the line to the inside bowl section, before shouldering off into deep water. There are no easy ones and since it only breaks maybe 20-30 days a year, the locals are as hungry as the Gillette coral. Any NE-E wind is  offshore (SE messes it up) and tide isn’t a problem, rather it’s timing a NW-NE swell that is big enough to make the hairpin journey around the island to the bay. Due E swell has it's power sapped by Anegada. ","id":480},"josiah's bay":{"description":" Josiah’s Bay is the most consistent beachbreak and unlike Cane Garden, this beach is slightly off the beaten track, attracting more cows than sunbathers. The quality of the wave depends on the shape of the sandbanks, but there’s always something to ride on a small day, including a long right, ideally suited for longboarding. Another advantage is that it can hold loads of surfers but unfortunately it stinks when the swell gets overhead. There are more waves on the island, including powerful beachies in remote, roadless locations and the odd fickle reef in town. Finding them would require boating along the coast or making friends in the small local surfing community. ","id":481},"loblolly bay":{"description":"Anegada is completely different from all the other British Virgin Islands in that this coral island’s highest point is only 10m (30ft) above sea level, in fact the whole island looks just like a giant beach. The surrounding reef is a popular diving area and wide exposure to the wind probably makes it better for sailboarding. Another option on the island is Loblolly, which is usually onshore since it faces east, but it picks up a maximum of swell. This spot is very remote and it’s a long paddle to the peak. On a windless day, there will be a long, relaxed left and a much more intense and hollow right. ","id":482},"wilderness":{"description":null,"id":712},"cupecoy":{"description":"Another serious righthand reefbreak is Cupecoy; if it’s big and coming from the NW, the wave will pitch a couple of barrelling sections before ending right on a cliff.","id":484},"the ledge":{"description":"Orient is St Barths’ surfing hub, where members of the Reefer's Surf Club meet before or after a session at The Ledge, a shallow A-frame reef. ","id":485},"anse couleuvre":{"description":"Another narrow swell window, trade-wind protected righthander on the lee side of a big Caribbean island, that only works occasionally in the winter months. Starts off with a manageable drop into a wall that wraps around the coral heads and gets very hollow in parts. Speeds through to the inside where an early exit avoids the shallow coral and urchin township. Definitely an experienced surfers only spot, but everyone can admire the raw cliff and jungle backdrop, plus there are some easier rights to the south. Good vibes in the small crowds - not a place to hassle for waves.","id":486},"grand riviere":{"description":null,"id":487},"plage des surfeurs":{"description":"2km (1.2mi) from the centre of the fishing port of Tartane, the Anse Bonneville hosts the Plage des Surfeurs, the most consistent (although often messy) and best known spot on the island. After paddling around a large coral patch, mellow rights and lefts can be surfed, with some longer rides possible on the rights. A surf school takes advantage of the smaller inside wave. Out on the point, Roukoukou is a sucky, barreling left and right that handles swell, but not wind.","id":488},"playa parguito":{"description":"Taking its name from the red snapper fish, Parguito is the island’s primo surfspot. Its extra consistency makes it a regular pick for surf contests and national championships are regularly organised here. It was also home to the Pan American Surfing Games in February 2002, which saw the local team take victory ahead of Guadeloupe and Peru. Parguito can get hollow despite the regular onshore winds. ","id":489},"playa copey":{"description":"Playa Copey’s righthand pointbreak and other peaks, 7 km (4mi) before Carúpano, have been the site of national surfing championships. ","id":490},"estero del plátano":{"description":"Just as hard to reach, Estero del Plátano has a good reputation among surfers of northern Ecuador. What appears to be a beachbreak ultimately breaks over reef since the sand is covering a good rock set-up. Waves regularly barrel thanks to typically offshore winds in the morning. It needs NW, or very strong W swells.","id":491},"mompiche":{"description":"One of Ecuador’s best waves, Mompiche is all about long tubular rides in perfect scenery. This left pointbreak starts with a barreling first section before reeling over a sharp rock ledge and is well protected from the wind. Despite the long walk the wave is popular with surfers from Bahía de Caráquez and Atacames. These locals are usually friendly, but be respectful! NW and W swells work best but it has been surfed on strong SW swells. ","id":492},"canoa":{"description":"16kms (10mi) of beach stretch around Canoa; the beachbreaks are top quality, with long rides or tubes depending on what the tide is doing. It will take any swell direction but again, NW and W is best. Individual spot names include The Bridge, The Lab and Briceño. ","id":493},"la islilla (piura)":{"description":"La Islilla is a fishing village where local kids like to ride the waves on wooden boards fashioned from the decks of decommissioned fishing boats. The righthand pointbreak on the right side of this little bay can get really hollow when a summer N swell meets any wind from the east. Natural footers will want to try this one, but it is hard to catch it working since it ranks as low to medium consistency (3-4/10). ","id":494},"nonura":{"description":"Bayovar’s world-class spot, Nonura is only accessible by 4WD and camping is the only accommodation option. A long, tough paddle out against strong currents, leads to the classic tubular pointbreak lefts. Nonura will take any swell from the SW to the NW but it needs to be big enough as the wave only really reveals itself over 5ft (1.8m) and maxes out around 10-12ft (3-4m). This wave is to be taken seriously. ","id":495},"la herradura (lima)":{"description":"La Herradura is the best pointbreak in Lima, isolated in a relatively deserted, horseshoe bay in the Chorrillos district. This powerful left breaks along a high cliff for rides up to 500m (1500ft) split into 3 sections. The steep, hollow take-off becomes a long workable wall before spinning through a tubular inside section. Requires a solid swell to start breaking and gets better as the size increases, holding up to 12ft (4m) faces on the best days. Winds are usually not a problem since the dominant S wind blows offshore and low tide is better. Such a quality wave in the middle of such a big city draws plenty of crowds to this experts only break. Old timers claim the construction of a coastal road in the early 80’s vastly reduced the waves' quality, but it is still worth waiting around for and is the only show in town when a big swell hits. ","id":496},"hornitos":{"description":"The popular coastal resort of Hornitos has a long beach with good short rides for learners, provided the wind is not too strong, nor the tide too high. Head toward the southern cliffs for more protection or around to Playa Itata for more size. ","id":497},"peñarol":{"description":"Peñarol is another mysterious and secluded desert break; the rights can be quite long, but  swell needs to be more W to avoid being too sectiony. Lefts into the rocky cove are more common. It also needs to be over 10ft of swell on the open coast as it is tucked into the massive bay behind Isla Santa Maria.","id":498},"la puntilla (antofagasta)":{"description":"Breaking next to an artificial sand beach, La Puntilla’s left reefbreak is Antofagasta’s most central and famous wave. With lots of sections it can accommodate the regular city crowds.","id":499},"la popular":{"description":"Below La Pepita starts another bay where jetties mark the spots' limits. The most famous one is aptly named La Popular and local bodyboarders are all over these little hollow peaks. The next bay used to host the “Rincon-esque” Cabo Corrientes pointbreak, remembered as the best wave in Argentina, but one too many jetties have made it a thing of the past. ","id":500},"miramar":{"description":"The island sitting just offshore has an occasional hollow, fast and high quality right barrelling off the shallow reef. The stream depositing fluorescent red water straight into the line-up controls the crowd.","id":4355},"pepino":{"description":"One of Rio’s great spots is Pepino where lefts can be tubular but frequently zooed out by bodyboarders in the water and lots of hang-gliders circling above. ","id":502},"ponta negra":{"description":"Exposed NE facing beach break with fetch all the way to Portugal or thereabouts. This beach is not too chaotic, though - it tends to break in the same places instead of being all random.","id":3896},"geriba ":{"description":"Buzios is a ritzy seaside resort with nice villas, friendly pousadas and beautiful people. In the ‘70s, hippies would escape there from the military dictatorship. Geriba is Buzios’ most consistent beachbreak, best on NE wind and S to E swell, but it gets super-crowded on weekends. ","id":504},"tiririca":{"description":"Out of Itacaré’s 12 beaches, Tiririca is only 10 minutes walk from downtown, with a reputation for strongly disputed beachbreak at the year-round, regular venue for regional and state championships. The neighbouring beaches like Resende, Costa and Ribeira get some surf but don't compare in the consistency stakes. Most of the southern beaches are rocky and framed within undulating rainforest topography. Between Tiririca Beach and the beaches of Ilhéus, 50km (31mi) south along Estrada EcolÛgica, there are a plenty of uncrowded, pristine beaches. These beaches benefit from a deep coastal trench, aiding power and shape.","id":505},"norte":{"description":"Ilheus’ most consistent beach is Norte stretching for 50km (30mi) of low tide barrels. There are several access points to the green waves as the road parallels the Rio Almada. ","id":506},"baduska":{"description":"Baduska in town is one of the longest rights in Brazil. If the sections Baduska, Concha and Boca de Barra link, 1km rides are do-able.","id":507},"boca do poço":{"description":"Potentially the best right point on a northerly swell, Boca Do Poço offers very long rides on a pushing tide, when crowds are guaranteed. ","id":508},"tabinha":{"description":null,"id":509},"icarai":{"description":"From Caucaia, hit the coast at Icarai for a taste of Ceara’s most consistent and strongest beachbreaks. It’s a regular WQS contest site and attracts intense crowds. Check by Casa Amarela Restaurant or at Cata-Vento. ","id":510},"fortaleza":{"description":"Covering all Fortaleza breaks","id":511},"jakes":{"description":"Only 3kms (2mi) S of Kalbarri town is a pure gem of Indian Ocean power called Jakes, a kegging left point that breaks along a gnarly shelf for 200m+. This place was created to accurately depict the term 'elevator drop' as the wave goes sickeningly square over the reef that is barely covered and dry reef often protrudes a few meters in front of the lip explosion. Corrugations in the face or double lips are a possibility at low tide right on the diminutive take-off spot. The barrel immediately starts grinding down the point, wrapping slightly into the bay but rarely letting up for too much in the way of turns as down-the-line speed is imperative. Too much W in the swell will render it unmakeable while mid tides increase the safety factor - marginally.","id":512},"bowes river":{"description":"From Kalbarri down to Northampton, vivid red and yellow sandstone bluffs meet the Indian Ocean making access a hassle and reducing surf potential. Port Gregory has some wind-exposed reef and beachbreak, while  Bowes River near Northampton is a great spot to camp for a few days and surf the rivermouth peaks  or the offshore reefs of Horrocks and Camel. It’s consistent, and the mixed sand and reef breaks are not too heavy. ","id":513},"drummonds":{"description":"Subject to the vagaries of sand distribution, cracking peaks and hollower walls can be found off the pure white sands at Drummonds Point. Small to moderate pulses from the W and any E wind plus higher tides will bring out the best in this improver/intermediate wave. Can be some decent length of ride on the lefts and will handle some size if it's clean.","id":514},"geraldton":{"description":"Covering Hell's Gate and Sunset Beach","id":515},"three bears":{"description":"A series of reef peaks affectionately called Three Bears, thanks to their ability to have something in the just right category in a wide range of swell sizes. The hierarchy is obvious with Papa’s furthest out and able to handle triple overhead plus. Mama's can be a perfect sucking barrel on those medium-sized SW swell days, with heavy drops and speedy walls, favouring the lefts at mid tides. Baby’s isn't always the runt of the litter and can have nice spiralling lefts and a few decent rights off the peak in small to moderate SW-W swells. Makes the most of small swells and is prone to regular clean-up sets at any size.","id":516},"injidup":{"description":"The point at Injidup needs a sizeable SW or moderate W swell to wrap around before the lumbering lefts get going. Steep, open faces, interrupted by ill-tempered slabs of rock, bringing down sections and messing with the flow to the channel. Tidally sensitive and protected from S winds it's often fat and far less appealing than the car park reefs.","id":517},"margaret river":{"description":"Sitting 10km (6mi) west of the town of Margaret River, the famous Margaret River lefts known as Surfers Point can be found, grinding down the reef. It is a peak in swells up to 6ft (2m) but Margaret’s is all about size and the lefts will handle plenty of that. Heartstopping drops, lumpy bowls and cutback walls are all part of the waves’ personality and it can handle a healthy dose of onshore wind, maintaining shape and some face smoothness for long, swooping turns. Watch out for speed bumps when cranking off the bottom and keep an eye on the horizon. Getting caught inside is no fun and positively dangerous if taking on the rights. Best conditions will be solid W swell, skimpy E wind and mid to high tide to create those picture perfect barrel, wall, barrel, shoulder rides that you see TC riding in the movies.","id":518},"witzig's (point sinclair)":{"description":"Most waveriders from the Adelaide area can’t resist the call of the desert, but rarely go further than the Eyre Peninsula. Those that make the journey as far as Penong (“The Rock Hole”), head another 21k’s (13mi) south down a white lime dirt road, to Point Sinclair. The most southern spot is an outside break called Witzig’s, named after Paul Witzig, the filmaker/journo who was one of the first to scope out this area. It is a powerful left with dredging takeoffs and can peel off for long distances when lined up on a moderate S-SW swell. Highly exposed.","id":519},"johanna":{"description":"The western side of Cape Otway picks up all the available swell so if it’s flat around Torquay, then the powerful beachbreaks of Johanna will be working. The sand is anchored by various bits of reef and there's a decent left at the eastern headland. Rips scour out paddling channels that are indispensable as the swell hits headhigh and the central peaks are often out of control with swell or wind, reducing consistency. Packs real punch and is usually better at lower tides, although it will still work at high.","id":520},"apollo bay":{"description":"Heading back to the east side of Cape Otway through the beautiful National Park to Apollo Bay, where there is a right off the harbour breakwall and outside jetty that can handle moderate size and will line up a bit better with some E in the swell. Can peel a nice line during the low tide window. There are also some nicely protected beachies perfect for beginners and escaping large, stormy conditions. Around the headland, Marengo offers a brace of more exposed reefs, a righthand point and some changeable, small swell beachies.","id":521},"lorne":{"description":"When the SW wind is howling and the swell is pumping, most surfers head for the protection of this major bay and hope they luck into one of the rare, magical days when the rights are hissing and barrelling for anything up to 500m all the way into the crumbly beachbreaks. Prefers a major SE swell and any W in the wind, the canvas of the long walls entice speed carves, snaps and tucks as it runs over the sand covered slab reef fingers. There's a big gap in the rock about halfway down that big swells will jump, but it has a sectiony nature and rarely lines up perfectly. The lower the better so spring tide ranges make this a summery wave. Around the corner past the pier are 2 more righthanders that hit the second rocky bay - Barrels is a short, sharp drop to deep water shoulder while Weeds is a powerful, outside section that can be messy and rippy, but picks up swell more easily than the point.","id":522},"anglesea":{"description":null,"id":523},"bells beach":{"description":"Victoria’s most famous surf spot is a classic and consistent right point that breaks on almost any tide, any wind and any decent swell from SE-SW. It’s a long wave broken into 3 sections (which may just link up in huge swells), starting outside at Rincon, leading into Bell's Bowl and finishing in the beach shorebreak. Power is always associated with this wave and few escape the flogging of an outside set on the head and gruelling paddle outs as it grows beyond double overhead. When small it is playful and ripable, offering endless carve and cutback corners along a lengthy platform reef that is prone to some long, unmakeable sections. Will be at it best in wrapping SW swell and NW winds, but will still have takers in ugly onshore conditions as well. If the crazy crowd is too much, on the headland to the south there are more rights at Centreside that are lower quality and less intimidating than Bell's plus some real decent lefts in SE swells and higher tides at Southside.","id":524},"torquay":{"description":"This SE-facing beach tames the SW swell and orders it into nice, easy rollin' rides for the hordes of beginners, longboarders and every other type of craft. Has some rocky formations at both ends including Drainoes, a peak that leans towards the lefts halfway out towards Point Danger, a spot where kites and windsurfers traverse the boggy rights and is rarely any good for a paddle.","id":525},"miami":{"description":"As the long beach starts to curve eastwards towards Burleigh Heads, the aspect improves for cleaner conditions in S winds, but it any SE swell will slightly by-pass the Miami stretch. Used to be a bit of a quiet spot away from the crowds, but these days nowhere is empty along the Surfers strip. Beat the wind by getting up early and avoid high tide when the waves go slack and the outside/inside channel cuts length of ride.","id":527},"kirra":{"description":"Kirra is Australia’s and probably the world’s best righthand point that breaks over sand. Air drops into various tube sections, which seem to suck out below sea level, adding sand to the already ridiculously powerful and thick lips. Super long, slabby sections need breakneck speed to negotiate while praying the inevitable drop-in wont happen on the deepest tube of your life. After the First Groyne was built in the early Seventies, Kirra went into coma for a couple of years before re-awakening better than ever when the sand returned. Second Groyne was built in 1980 and gets just as dredgy as big brother. Kirra holds major swells plus crowds that all other crowds can be measured by! It all depends on the sand and these days with all the pumping and re-nourishment projects going on, the set up is prone to change. Many mourned the 2nd passing of Kirra in the Noughties when the Second (Little) Groyne got buried, the sand piled up and even lefts started breaking, but it has slowly recovered and breaks at about a third to a half the size of the prevailing swell. Big, solid SE groundswell is the preferred element, while E and even NE cyclone swells can also produce epic barrels if the sand is right.","id":528},"trigg point":{"description":"Trigg Point is Perth’s most consistent and crowded wave, producing a decent length, peeling righthander, over a sand covered reef by the groyne. The adjacent beachbreak can get some well shaped banks but it all depends on how much sand has collected over summer, when surfing restrictions apply. NE-E winds are offshore and the peaks down at the other car parks may be just as good, but less packed. ","id":529},"strickland bay":{"description":"Bicycles are the only way to get around Rottnest and swarms of surfers pedal straight to Strickland Bay, the most consistent break. Superb lefts up to 12ft (4m) over a shallow reef ledge that has a lock-in end tube section. There are decent rights on smaller swells. ","id":530},"chinamans":{"description":"Without a doubt, Chinamans is the classic South Australian spot for advanced surfers. The take-off zone is small and crowded, the drops are vertical, the reef is shallow and sharp, getting in and out is tricky but the barrels are excellent. It's all about the left but occasionally there can be some rights. Baby Chinamans is a softer version, east of the main break which also works on lower tides and N to W winds. ","id":531},"seaford":{"description":"In an E wind and large W-SW swell, Seaford rights offer the longest walls around, often peeling through a few sections to the inside shorey.","id":532},"middleton point":{"description":"The south coast on the Fleurieu Peninsula picks up more swell and is offshore when N winds are blowing.  For mal-riders/beginners/improvers, Middleton Point is the place. Even with 50 guys out, this right point, rated in the top 10 gutless waves by Tracks in 2002, has room for everyone. Often works better in onshores as it it crumbles and reforms time and agin on the long journey into the beach. Paddle out can be annoyingly gruelling when constant swell lines break all over the place. ","id":533},"cape kersaint":{"description":"This is a heavy, deep-water pointbreak below cliffs that is not for the faint-hearted. Rumbling walls hurl themselves at the rock shelf and when it's big S swell, barrels materialise, enticing the crazies into the unpredictable line-up. ","id":534},"gunnamatta":{"description":"The most consistent spot on this SW exposed coast is Gunnamatta, home of many contests for its power and shape. A webcam looks out from the 2nd car park (pay in summer), focusing on fast peaks whose quality is dictated by the equally fast flowing rips that shape the sandbanks and channels. Takes a SW swell, NE winds and anything up to double overhead on the push. Since Nov ‘98, surfers have been demonstrating to get the sewage outfall closed. ","id":535},"phillip island":{"description":"Covering all Phillip Island breaks","id":536},"shipstern bluff":{"description":"Shipstern Bluff or Fluffys, an ironic tribute to its power, has become one of the world's iconic waves, often being compared with Jaws and Teahupoo for out-and-out gnarliness. When the proper 4m+ SW swells arrive, it is rarely ridden by paddle surfers and is the domain of a few crazy tow-in crews. Swells abruptly hit the granite ledge, only a few metres off a spectacular boulder-piled headland, creating a crazily difficult ride that features below sea-level surges, massive steps in the face and two-storey, double barrels with a malevolent nature. It's invaluable to have the whip in to the first peak, which then briefly draws breath before exhaling deeply over the dreaded step where being strapped is even more essential. Even Kelly Slater got caught out paddling this beast.","id":537},"cloudy bay":{"description":"On a small to medium, peaky swell, scenic Cloudy Bay can produce good beachbreak waves, favouring rights breaking into the rip. Any hint of north in the wind will be offshore somewhere along the curve of white sand. Gets picture perfect on it's day and the rockier peaks around Middle Beach are a good shout. Around this area is Labillardire State Reserve, hosting a few fickle reefs and Australia’s southernmost lighthouse. ","id":538},"clifton beach":{"description":"Clifton Beach is Hobart’s most popular spot, only 30min drive from the city centre. The south end is usually a bit softer where a defined right appears on moderate SE-S swells and offers some protection from W winds. Up the beach is a bit pushier and the sandbanks are flanked by deep channels to help deal with the common close-out. Can be mushy and gutless in small, onshore conditions.","id":539},"cabarita":{"description":"When it’s small, the best swell-magnet is Cabarita, often chosen as a contest site for its consistency. The point does not have the quality of neighbouring pointbreaks, but it's cool and easy with plenty of different moods. Outside off the main headland starts looking good in stronger winter SE-S swells with some lurching sections down towards the second outcrop that usually holds the barrel section if the sand is in place. Smaller days can see perfect peelers inside the first bay, out of the clutches of the SE sea-breezes. Otherwise it can just be chopped up walls of swell hitting the two separate points and wandering across the bars, doing fat and flat chat in one wave. Over the backside in the lee of Norries Head, some sweet A-Frames flash across the sandbars that continue all the way down to Hastings Point, offering a crowd-free option for walkers. Gets too full at high unless it is sizey, which Cabarita can handle beyond double overhead.","id":540},"byron bay":{"description":null,"id":541},"lennox head":{"description":"In February 1962, two Kiwis stumbled upon Lennox Head, now generally regarded as Australia’s finest righthand point. The first photos were published in Surfing World in 1966, followed by a sealed road in 1972, and since then surfers have flocked to the break, including hard-core riders from the surrounding countryside that keep a long pintail under the house for big Lennox days. Few waves compare for speed, barrel sections, length of ride and an ability to handle the biggest NE-S swells. While a NE swell meeting a SW wind is considered primo, Lennox will also bend a S to its will, hitting a number of launch sites along the half kilometre headland. Along that rocky ride, expect full-throttle, ruler-edged walls to gusset multiple times and envelop those fast and canny enough to hold the right line. Holds proper size when the prospect of leaping off the rocks looks suicidal and the current running down the point is likely to challenge the strongest paddlers. Needless to say, this is an experts only wave. There's plenty of scrappy beachbreak to keep the groms happy in town and it is worth a check up towards the lake when the point is sleeping, which is a lot of the time.","id":542},"double island point":{"description":"Double Island Point is a safe cyclone swell bet for extremely long rights by the lighthouse and occasional lefts on the beachbreak. Jelly legs and arms dictates walking back decreasing the chance of meeting the abundant sharks. Not usually crowded thanks to the difficult access. Reliable, local tour operators can provide the necessary 4WD transport. Cherry Venture shipwreck can be the exception to the close-out rule along the beach highway beside the Cooloola National Park. ","id":543},"tea tree (noosa)":{"description":"Tea Tree (Ti or T) is the locals favourite and a 20 minute walk into the Noosa National Park, but it doesn’t deter the crowds. Steeper and hollower than the other points, especially at low tide, when there is more chance of stepping on an urchin or landing on a rock just below the surface. Holds a bit more swell and winds from E-S, but once again, high tide is likely to bring you into conflict with the rocks, unless it is pumping. Granite Bay shows the most size, but relies on sand formations and rarely equals the other points for perfection, especially if there is more E in the wind.","id":544},"coolum beach":{"description":"The main town beach is just a continuation of Sunshine Beach, so the peaks can get punchy and hollow on small to moderate E swells. Stumers Creek often has the goods and thee are proper barrels on the good days. The two NE-facing rocky beaches of Point Perry and Three Bays need a bit of size to get going since they are sheltered from S swells and winds by Point Arkwright. Tidally dependant and a bit fickle, it is usually better at the main beach.","id":545},"the bluff":{"description":"In small swells, Alexandra Headland or The Bluff is a fat and forgiving righthand point that gets packed with longboarders in the water and tourists on the beach. Handles a bigger swell from the south, when rips increase and the walls have more power, but it is still a fairly benign wave. There's more rights on the inside at the Corner as it heads into the beachbreak lefts.","id":546},"happys (caloundra)":{"description":"South of town, Kings Beach often looks messy and crappy, but transforms to hollow, pitching peaks when NE’ers hit. The groyne at the southern end sits on a rock shelf and entertains thick, cylindrical lefts in most NE-SE swells and is fully protected from any N wind. A bit further south at Happy's, the sandbars that flank the Pumicestone Passage can output long, full lefts.  ","id":547},"satellite beach":{"description":null,"id":548},"waimea bay":{"description":"The benchmark, big-wave forum of Hawaii’s North Shore. Although somewhat eclipsed by outer reef tow-in breaks, mere mortals will find the 20-25ft (6-8m) swells that Waimea can provide more than enough of a challenge. Deep water swells arrive suddenly, tripping on a lava shelf sitting a good 100m+ out from the northern headland. This creates a wave that lurches violently up, then out, resulting in the famous Waimea air drop take-off, followed by an endless plunge over boils, chops and gutters to the trough, then a race to the channel, chased by hundreds of tons of water. Strong trades, funneling down Waimea Valley are far from ideal, getting under the nose of your gun and holding you in a lip that’s renowned for thick, high psi power, so light ESE wind is best, mid tide and a long period NW swell. On smaller days below 15ft (5m), when The Bay proper isn't working, a sandbar and boulder section called Pinballs can reel off some juicy little pockets right along the lava rock point. Waimea's shorebreak is a gnarly mix of crashing lips and powerful pockets; once avoided, today it's packed with suicidal bodyboarders and even a few stand-up surfers. Getting in and out of the water requires timing through the shorebreak in the northern corner, while the overpowering current drags victims down to the jump rock. Crowds are thick, especially at the starting size around 15ft and sharing a set is common practice although flying boards and bodies heighten the risks. Specialist equipment, big wave experience and total commitment required.","id":549},"gorleston":{"description":"Slow, poor beachbreaks on shifting sandbars. Similar offshore sandbar situation to Lowestoft. Needs a solid N swell with mid to high tides to work and will be rippy at size. Occasionally gets a long walled left and hollow right by the groynes. ","id":550},"south padre island":{"description":"Covers all spots around the US/Mexico border","id":551},"hoddevika":{"description":"Stadlandet beachbreak with a more dominant right called Peach, just inside the north end jetty. Works best in SW-W swells and  the steep mountains give good wind protection. ","id":552},"brusand":{"description":"A fickle but fun beachbreak that refracts in sizeable NW swells and makes the best of any S swell. It produces the best sandbars around, but the currents are usually stronger than the beaches further north. Mostly short, but powerfull waves when it is on.  ","id":553},"sele":{"description":"Boulder and sand pointbreak providing fun, unchallenging, short righthanders at the north end of Bore beach. When the rivermouth strips out the sand and a SW swell hits, it can get faster and harder. ","id":554},"point perfect (orre)":{"description":"Slightly misleading name that only applies when clean SW swell sweeps down long boulder point in the form of slow walls and cutback shoulders. Picks up other swells but doesn't link up and handles a bit of N wind.","id":555},"saltstein":{"description":"Waves hit the boulder reef from deeper water creating rideable waves in a limited fetch scenario. Occassionally surprises with workable walls but more often onshore and messy. Holds some shape in unfavourable conditions.  ","id":556},"al ashkharah":{"description":"In this northerly area, most Dubai surfers go to Shipwreck Beach at Al Ashkarah, especially if decent sized, powerful surf is on the cards. The reef extends out a fair way, so at low tide long, mellow righthanders break 100-200m (300-600ft) off the beach. If it’s small, there’s a surfable shoredump at high tide and Al Ashkharah Hotel is handily situated. ","id":557},"salalah":{"description":null,"id":558},"seal rocks":{"description":null,"id":559},"cape kiwanda":{"description":"There’s a good righthand reef peak on the south side of the cape that works when the sandbars are right on a big clean W or WNW swell. There’s a clean beachbreak on the inside that’s sheltered from N and NW winds. Cruiser walls for the mal brigade when smaller. ","id":560},"arugam bay":{"description":"A-Bay has been a stepping-stone on the Indian Ocean trail for a long time, thanks to its reputation for being a class act in an exotic, laid-back zone. Long, lazy rights peel down the sand and rock southern point of Arugam Bay for hundreds of meters, bending to parallel the beach and slowly diminishing in size along the way. It starts off with a bit of a hollow section, then walls and shoulders in inviting sections that are more playful as opposed to powerful. This means all abilities are found in the extremely crowded line-up and drop-ins, snaking and bad vibes are commonplace during the peak season of May – August. ","id":562},"g-land":{"description":"All arrivals for the G-Land surf camps hit the beach north of the point, allowing expectant newbies their first glimpse of the unfurling barrels from a side-on perspective. Not until you stand on the reef looking front-on does the scale of the wave become apparent. Furthest out to the far left is Kong’s, which is often the messiest section of the reef, peaking up in a slightly haphazard way and capable of more shiftiness. West swell will see it slab and barrel while S will wall and shoulder more. It is the call when swell drops below headhigh (very rare) and the extra water depth makes it less sketchy than other sections. Still has enough power to snap boards on the smallest days, it’s hard to stay lined-up and it’s a long walk or endless paddle.Money Trees is the default setting for most G-Land sessions, attracting the bulk of the campers to what looks like perfect peeling barrels for 2-300m. Depending on the tide and swell direction, the tubes can undulate from cavernous pits to tight, high envelopes and getting caught behind is guaranteed, so time any cutbacks carefully. Getting in early and at the right spot is essential and shoulder hopping is often punished, so fight the urge to spin and go and keep paddling. It’s shallow at low, prompting many to wear helmets and there are a couple of holes in the featureless reef that ease the entry/exit scramble between sets. Money Trees gets better at size and is probably ideal at 12ft faces, but will handle up to triple overhead. Launching Pad is the least defined section because it only really appears on moderate to heavy swells and is rarely in the mood to transport surfers between Money’s and Speedies. Wider rogue sets will hit the patch of reef beyond the normal whitewash line and look like tapering into nothing, but as the name suggests, it suddenly jumps up again and starts the pedal-to-the-metal section known as Speed Reef. Undoubtedly the champagne ride of them all, Speedies requires all the skills in spades. Just making the drop is an achievement, while drawing the right line and maintaining velocity are crucial as it doesn’t let up or offer an easy escape for 200m of precision peeling. The reef whizzes by in clear menace, and is the sharpest, shallowest patch so surf it on the push from quarter tide.  ","id":563},"nusa dua":{"description":"Offshore righthand supermarket with a confusing amount of aisles to go shopping in. All available swell is sucked into the entrance of the deep Lombok Strait and bent onto this 2km curve of coral reef. Unlike other Bukit set-ups, it focuses into a vast array of shifting peaks, hitting different lumps of the reef and drawing up into powerful, heavy-lipped bowls and long sections of speed carve walls. At size, the drops get serious and thick, while unpredictable sections add to the sense of roulette – eventually you will get one on the head. It rarely links up into a super-long ride, but the paddle back out always seems longer against the background drift north and if you try the zippy, open lefts on the far inside section, prepare to be punished paddling back out. Wet season all day staple and dry season sneaky early. Conserve your strength and pay for a return boat ride out there.","id":564},"uluwatu":{"description":"Ultra-consistent “Ulu’s”  is the focal point of Balinese surfing thanks to it’s ability to handle any size swell from small to large and spread the biggest of crowds across a wide playing field of reef. It’s sectioning, hollow walls always produce great waves, starting with faster, high tide, occasional tuck-ins up at Temples that lead down to the muscular, steep drops of The Peak that offers open face with hollow pockets directly in front of the famous cave. It can sometimes jump the deadspot and barrel through to the start of the Racetrack, which twists and bends the wailing walls in an ever increasing race against the falling curtain. When swells exceed the 8-10ft mark, Outside Corner will rumble into life, with heavy, thick-lipped sections at low tide for experts on sturdy pintails. Main hazard is the crowd, followed by the reef and the constant  higher tide sweep that requires aiming for a spot well south of the cave to come in. Blow it and you’ll paddle another 15min circuit.","id":565},"kuta beach":{"description":"Famous, fine-grained beach that has been bringing surfing to the masses since the 1930’s. Visually, the tropical idyll has been buried beneath concrete, but it still maintains a certain aura that attracts surfers of all abilities to what can be super-fast tunnels or dribbly, knee-high corners. On any given day, there may be a dozen yellow rash vests, proning out their first ever waves while alongside a Balinese local effortlessly punts a 360. The mayhem continues on the beach where endless streams of hawkers offer paintings, jewelry, tattoos, shells, T-shirts, drinks, ice cream, day-trips, transport, beach loungers, umbrellas and board hire, just to name a few! Usually better from mid to high, the trades are more offshore here, but water quality is very dubious after rain.","id":566},"desert point":{"description":"When it is on, Desert Point is indeed one of the longest, makeable lefthand barrels on the planet with over 20secs tube time possible on one wave. The take-off area can shift around a little but generally rewards a deep attack. High speed is the key as it quickly winds up and starts peeling mercilessly across the shallow reef, cutting a trench in the coral where the mechanical lips have been slamming for centuries. The caverns get larger and faster as the inside section commits the tube rider to a lock-in that usually ends on dry reef. Only surfers good enough to deal with the tricky exit, the shallow reef, evil out-going currents and plenty of wave-starved rippers should apply. Desert’s has a reputation for inconsistency, with only the biggest groundswells igniting it and high tides making it disappear as fast as it came. Surf charters keep flocking from Bali and dedicated hardcore surfers wait for weeks in basic beach shacks, forming a frenzied, barrel-hungry pack on those rare classic days. Boats have access to the sheltered bay of islands behind Bangko Bangko where there are some big swell, high tide options for intermediates around the other Gili islands like Ringgit. ","id":567},"kuta":{"description":"Like it’s namesake on Bali, Kuta is the surfing hub of Lombok, where all mod cons can be found. It’s another wet-season-centric spot as the righthander on the western headland is offshore in NW winds and likes a SE-S swell. Like Mawun and Air Guling, the left across the channel is lower quality and often messy, but both are fun, no consequence waves for all abilities and a lazy session instead of driving off in search of better waves.","id":568},"beacons":{"description":"Touted as the Maldives gutsiest wave, Beacons' powerful rights tube onto a shallow, unforgiving reef. SW swells will break down the reef, but a SE swell will create peaks slamming straight onto closeout sections of coral. ","id":569},"tiger stripes":{"description":"The next pass to the east is a narrow inlet between the islands of Gan and Gadhdhoo, where the first local surfers are starting to ride the lefts and reforms at Tiger Stripes. Antiques are the rights, which are always a couple of feet smaller and way more forgiving than the lefts. Named after the narrow gouges in the reef that give a striped effect, Tigers has some real growling lefts in a strong swell. Tricky take-offs into a long speed wall before committing to an inside tube section that wraps and peters out in the channel. Unimpressive when small, it always seems to be bigger than everywhere else. All tides, all variations of S swells and any N wind.","id":570},"malé":{"description":"The surf in Malé has transformed from rarely crowded to always crowded over the last decade, helped by the fact that the capital has the highest population density in the world. The large, exclusively local crew are becoming increasingly territorial, because resorts on neighbouring islands exclude them (i.e: non-paying guests) from the line-up. This leaves them with effectively 1 wave to surf - Raalhugandu, the main break in town, which luckily, is one of the most consistent and powerful waves in Maldives. Really wedges at low, but the waves get messed up at high by the massive coastal armouring tetrapods that line the beach. When it maxes out on big SE swells, you could surf Rats treacherous lefts on the backside corner of the island or on the next island west, Vilingili, where shallow rights peel in the biggest swells. There’s a left beside the runway on Hulhumalé that is seldom surfed, because the tail section is deadly and access is not easy. ","id":571},"pasta point":{"description":"Pasta Point, is exclusive for the max. 30 surfing guests booked into the Chaaya Dhonveli Resort. It’s consistent, handles NE-SE winds, starts and finishes fast with edgy, lip-bashing wall in between.","id":572},"castlepoint":{"description":null,"id":573},"elbow ledge":{"description":null,"id":574},"lagundri bay - the point":{"description":"It’s been called many things including Nias, Lagundri, Sorake and most often just The Point, but whatever name is used, it always ends up in the world’s top 10 waves. Here’s why; the paddle out through the keyhole is dry hair simplicity, the take-off is predictable, the barrel is a flawless almond shape that peels with precision at the perfect speed for up to 10 seconds, the reef is well covered, even though the recent up-thrust has made it barrel harder from waist high up to double overhead and beyond, plus the light seaward current from the channel deposits you nicely back at the peak, ironing out any shoulder bump on the way. It’s all tides, all (light) winds, all year (with luck) and all too easy to stay encamped in one of the many losmens or hotels that line Sorake Beach. Negatives include the crowd, some localism, flying boards, sea-lice, the crowd…. Losers in the new reef levels include Kiddieland, which has been replaced by a softer inside section of the point and The Machine, an ultra hollow left that now needs spring high tides and a macking swell. ","id":575},"moulay bousselham":{"description":"More open beachbreak north of the large lagoon outflow. Handles a bit more size on the shifty banks, but is best in peaky summer/autumn swells.  ","id":576},"barra beach":{"description":"Inhambane town is situated at the end of a long peninsula. On one side is a sheltered lagoon with many mangroves and traditional wooden dhows ferrying people and goods to and from Inhambane's little port. On the swell exposed side, there are a series of beaches and coves with plenty of consistent waves. The stunning Barra Beach is a long swathe of palm backed white sand with good quality accommodation hidden behind the trees. The wave here is often little more than a closeout but sometimes it throws up a quality beachbreak right at low tide. It faces north so is consistently offshore. At either end of the beach are a couple of mediocre sand points that can give long rides on the right day. ","id":577},"jelly babies (anakao)":{"description":"The flip side of the coin is the ultra-consistent, cruiser walls of Jelly Babies, which draw in the S swells to a pass closer to Anakao. Luckily it prefers low-tide, morning offshores and is fun on all sorts of craft, with crumbling walls and cutback shoulders keeping the intermediates happy. Another protected left breaks nearby on medium/large swells and is a great spot for beginners. ","id":578},"monseigneur bay":{"description":"Monseigneur Baie is the classic regional reefbreak, offering 150m of fun, workable walls going from super deep at the peak into shallow, flat rocks covered in live coral and urchins. Pumps in the winter from April to July when the S swells hit and if the wind is blowing from the S-SW. It is inconsistent, but rides are long and safe whilst the handful of stoked locals are totally unaware of localism. ","id":579},"accra":{"description":null,"id":580},"busua beach":{"description":"Regarded as Ghana’s best beach, Busua Bay with Abokwa Island offers ideal scenery to hang out as well as an offshore break. The beachbreak is fast and hollow, plus there is a right point, but many surfers walk to the west and paddle 20min to a good quality reef right.","id":581},"mutrakni point":{"description":"The only obvious left point in Ghana discovered so far is Mutrakni Point by Ajemra. It is well regarded and breaks over sand covered reef. Further west lies Axim’s hefty beachbreak by the beach resort with a fun reef nearby. ","id":582},"elmina":{"description":"Elmina’s exotic beaches are fringed with palms, the obligatory fort and a slow breaking, right pointbreak. In the early morning and evening, canoes paddle out through the surf and return, surfing on the crests of the waves, laden with fish for immediate sale at the local market. ","id":583},"assini":{"description":null,"id":584},"grand-lahou":{"description":"West of Abidjan is Grand-Lahou, a tourist zone with a ‘passe’ where a sandbank holds a decent right and a left, best on an incoming tide. ","id":585},"dagbego (dabego)":{"description":"In front of the Hotel Best of Africa,  there is a very nice beach with a right breaking from the tip of a rocky point. It needs a big swell to give long, workable walls, which wont be hollow. ","id":586},"sassandra":{"description":"Sassandra main beach is dirty but the rights off the pink granite reef can produce rides of up to 100m. There are some other good right point breaks around that are worth searching for. ","id":587},"san pedro":{"description":"San Pedro is a black lava reef where waves break in crystalline waters surrounded by lush jungle. It also has a consistent low tide shorebreak. From here towards the Liberian border access becomes difficult and the surf spots are located in very remote areas. ","id":588},"boucan":{"description":"Crowded Boucan has a fun, reliable left reef in swell up to 10ft, while the gnarly right only jacks up and barrels in solid size. Down the beach is another small swell left.","id":589},"roches-noires":{"description":"Roches Noires has a string of rights that cover most abilities from the rare, N swell loving slabs of Cachera and L’Escalier down to Banc de Sable and La Digue lefts, where even beginners can surf in big swells. ","id":590},"pointe des trois-bassins":{"description":"The 3 waves at Trois-Bassins are swell and crowd magnets, having waves when everywhere else is flat. La Barriere is the fast shallow right and odd left that works in any N or S swell. Most people ride The Peak closer to shore in the mouth of the river that has cut a deep pass in the reef. It’s a nice A-frame with feathering lips and tapered shoulders, accessible to most surfers. South of the cut is a fairly fat left wall that occasionally connects up on a due S swell. ","id":591},"saint-leu":{"description":"The famous lefts of St-Leu provide a truly world-class wave when stronger SW swells hit, usually in winter. It starts with a quick drop and open face wall, ideal for carving big turns, before bending sharply round the reef into a couple of bowly, hollow sections that throw out a shallow tube. Needs to be overhead to start linking up for the full 300m ride, but will work in sections when it is smaller. Experienced surfers only, despite the easy paddle-out and be respectful of the local pecking order. ","id":592},"saint-pierre":{"description":null,"id":593},"tamarin bay":{"description":"A moderate to big SW swell has to wrap heavily to break along the famous reef at Tamarin Bay. Hypnotic, cultured barrels tour the NW-facing reef when a moderate to large SW swell tacks in and long tube time is logged by the mix of locals and lucky holidaymakers. This long, perfectly formed, barrelling left becomes ultra-shallow at low tide, so higher tides are safer. Tuck-ins and speed slashes are the order of the day so lesser surfers should stick to the inside reform or beachbreak. Humourless crowds, urchins, sharp reef, currents and sharks. ","id":594},"souillac":{"description":"The right in Souillac breaks on a small swell and a N wind on the last bit of fringing reef before the coast gets cliffy. On huge south swells there is a psycho death righthand slab at Gris Gris—it would be a prime tow spot if jet skis were legal on Mauritius! ","id":595},"la ferme":{"description":"This forecast applies to all of Rodrigues","id":596},"choshi":{"description":"Most of the spots are mediocre beach breaks. At the N end of the Chiba peninsula is Choshi, a large fishing town with plenty of S facing beach breaks that work on typhoon swells. This is one of the few spots that can be crowd free, especially towards Shida. There are only a few access points to this powerful beach break that on W winds, high tide and a clean, moderate swell, can produce perfect barrels. These waves however can’t be described as ‘clean’ as this area is let down by the brown coloured water and industrial waste that frequently pollutes the beach. ","id":597},"torami":{"description":"Most of the spots are mediocre beachbreaks. At the N end of the Chiba peninsula is Choshi, a large fishing town with plenty of S facing beachbreaks that work on typhoon swells. This is one of the few spots that can be crowd free, especially towards Shida. There are only a few access points to this powerful beachbreak that on W winds, high tide and a clean, moderate swell, can produce perfect barrels. These waves however can’t be described as ‘clean’ as this area is let down by the brown coloured water and industrial waste that frequently pollutes the beach. ","id":598},"hebara":{"description":"Hebara is a consistent beachbreak, and has thus been chosen as a WCT contest site","id":599},"kamogawa (big ben)":{"description":" Kamogawa has plenty of peaks; one of the prime spots being a longboard wave called Big Ben. ","id":600},"wada rivermouth":{"description":"Wada is a rivermouth break that can be excellent and it’s one of the few places that breaks well on N/NE swells. Tokyo Bay itself is very sheltered and only works on the heaviest of typhoon swells. ","id":601},"niijima":{"description":null,"id":602},"kaifu river":{"description":"Kaifu, in Tokushima, is probably the best place to score the quality rivermouth waves. It’s about 45min from Cape Muroto, and is in the heart of the scenic Ana Quasi national coastal park. When it turns on it has heavy tubing rights in both the rivermouth and the neighbouring beach. When it’s on, it’s guaranteed busy, but especially so on Sundays. It can hold a decent sized swell and has been ridden up to 10-12ft (3-4m).","id":603},"ikumihama":{"description":"Ikumihama beach is very popular with surfers from Osaka, who use the overnight ferry from Nanko to surf the mellow waves. ","id":604},"niyodo":{"description":" On the western side of Cape Muroto, there’s more quality rivermouth waves, but they need perfect conditions to produce the goods. Monabe is one such spot, as is the excellent Niyodo, which can have world class lefts and rights. Luck is needed to get a strong SE-S swell and the wind with some N or E in it. ","id":605},"aha point":{"description":"Despite its remote position, Aha Port suffers from crowding, as it is one of the few known low-tide spots. The rights are worth the priority game but a better spot allegedly lurks in the vicinity. ","id":606},"kudaka":{"description":"Another island worth the 1h ferry trip from Baten Harbour is Kudaka, which has a very long left pointbreak next to the seawall and small island marina. Lots of sections but when they all link up, with the biggest NE swells, it’s a beauty! Stay a full day; the local ‘soba’ house is one of the best places for a hot meal. ","id":607},"castles":{"description":"Walk a bit further to Castles, which is just as consistent, much less crowded and offers a left point with 2 long sections. ","id":608},"sunabe seawall":{"description":"With no doubt, Sunabe Seawall is the main surfing arena with half a dozen reefbreaks including Typhoon Break’s long lefts, Hotels’ sectiony rights, 5-Rocks short peaks, California's & Hawaiian’s, Bowls rights or Sunabe Marina which is threatened by harbour development. ","id":609},"mainside":{"description":"Kamikaze bodyboarders head to scenic Cape Zanpa to ride one of the three breaks at Mainside. Consistent, tubey rights are common but the Outside reef is definitely the island’s most radical wave! ","id":610},"buma":{"description":"Nago City’s closest spot is Buma; two fun right and left pointbreaks of poor consistency. ","id":611},"okuragahama":{"description":"Much of this area’s surfing is based around the reliable beachbreaks at Okuragahama or Kanegahama. Neither are particularly quality waves but work on small swell and NW winds and have accommodation to hand. ","id":612},"ishinamigawa":{"description":"For better standard waves on NE-E swells, try Ishinamigawa (gawa means river) although getting out can be tough when it’s big. ","id":613},"kisakihama":{"description":"The main wave-riding area is Sosanji, where Kisakihama beach is plagued by intense crowds but localism is low, especially towards western surfers.","id":614},"oura":{"description":"Oura is one those magic spots which can be perfect when everywhere else is messy, because the shallow lefts hold N winds.","id":615},"pipeline & backdoor":{"description":"The most famous and infamous peak on the planet explodes onto an uneven, lava-slab reef a scant 80m offshore, forming the benchmark by which all other waves are measured. The left at Pipe is best awakened by swells with a generous helping of W in them, as too much N will cause a grisly shutdown over the dangerous, cave-pocked section of the reef. Outer reefs filter, bend and reform arriving swells, focusing energy and extra height on the peak, before abruptly releasing a lip that guillotines mercilessly along the first section until the explosion of spit heralds the shoulder and room for a turn or two. When the swell direction heads beyond NW, Backdoor swings open and welcomes the best tube-jockeys to an expansive room, but the door often slams shut across this expanse of ultra-shallow, incongruous reef. Air drops are the only way in if you want the inside at Backdoor and ideal conditions include mid tide, ESE wind and headhigh to double-overhead faces (3-6ft Hawaiian). The lack of a paddling channel means it's often better to take the rip north and utilise the more defined access to the left, but expect serious beatings from the steroidal lips and whitewash. The legion of hazards is eclipsed by one defining factor - the crowd. This is the most sought after ride on the planet and normal rules don't apply. Avoid speculation, hesitation, lip-launches, trips over the falls and eye contact with the crew who will burn you into the pit of Pipeline purgatory. Forget it during summer, yet even when it's barely breaking there will be a pack ticking the Pipeline box, despite better waves at some of the nearby spots. ","id":616},"peahi - jaws":{"description":"The most notorious spot on Maui is a wave most surfers are extremely unlikely to ride. With the development of tow-in surfing in the early 90's, Jaws burst onto the scene, amazing the world with the sheer magnitude of the waves that were being ridden there by a select group of windsurfing and surfing hell-men. As big wave surfing has developed, Jaws has maintained the biggest and baddest tag, even providing 4 of the 5 nominations for the XXL awards and winning biggest wave in ‘03, ’04, ’05 and ’10 plus monster paddle (x2), tube and ride categories in 2011 (and 2012). Takes any N swell, with more W favouring the long lefts, but it is the perfect, house-sized right tubes that most people associate with Jaws. Other waves have been discovered that challenge Jaws on height supremacy, but few can match its steroidal perfection. If you are thinking of tackling this wave, you will need far more knowledge of the spot than we can fit here and proper tow-in experience so as not to be a liability in the increasingly zooed line-up. A few of the hazards include trade wind cross chop and large speed-bump ribs that traverse the face, swatting surfers like bugs on a windshield. The impact zone is a washing machine all the way to the cliffs, regularly pulverizing boards, skis and bodies then punishing anyone fool enough to try and rescue their equipment off the slippery grinding boulders. Then there’s launching at Maliko Gulch  where punching in and out of the closed out bay is a game of Russian Roulette. ","id":617},"ma'alaea bay":{"description":"One of Hawai'is most famous summer spots is Ma'alaea, where a harbour breakwall has created a righthand wave that's considered to be the fastest in the world, but it needs a huge S-SW swell to break and is notoriously fickle. Use an F1 fast board to make the drop, bottom turn and pump into a racetrack so crowded that there will probably be someone dropping in with that chandelier section up ahead. Local activists and environmental groups have so far successfully blocked several proposed extensions of the Ma'alaea jetty which would destroy this world class gem. ","id":618},"teahupoo":{"description":"Every once in a while a new spot bursts into the surf world's psyche and totally redefines what is possible and where the limits are. Teahupoo has roared out of the deep blue and gobbled up all contenders snatching the belt and the crown for the 'World's Heaviest Wave'. Many surfers will remember their first glimpse of this freak of nature, most probably encapsulated by the infamous Laird Hamilton tow-in shots that graced the cover of many surf mags in 2000. What sets Teahupoo aside is the sheer power and ferocity of the incoming S swell that throws more out than up, once it reaches the overhead range. Maximum size is a moot point as it makes a mockery of most face measurements, containing a lip a few feet thick and a shape more rectangular than almond. More S in the swell will calm the beast slightly, but it is the straight on SW'ers that slam the reef and open up the caverns along the short 75-100m run for your life line-up. It's all about the drop really, which is more critical here than anywhere else and those able to set an early rail into the gasping tubes will do better. Mistakes are swiftly and properly punished as the highly visible reef runs close to dry so quickly, pushing the unlucky ones into the lagoon and the coral is famed for infecting cuts. When it's smaller and from the W, there is even the odd right, a la Backdoor, but dont get caught paddling back out. Teahupoo consistently pulls in more swell than anywhere on Tahiti, but getting the ideal NE wind is less common, especially in the high season.","id":619},"taapuna":{"description":"Close to Papeete is Taapuna, the original Tahitian tube garden and popular destination wave for those who want a hollow, dredging and technically testing lefthander, a couple of notches below Teahupoo. Any W swell and any E wind will work, so it is consistent, crowded with good surfers and suited to experienced reefbreak surfers. ","id":620},"rangiroa atoll":{"description":"There are no recognised spots (that we know of) in Tuamotu so this spot will do for all of the atoll. The atolls get both northerly and southerly swells, so ignore the grey wind stars here.","id":621},"faré":{"description":null,"id":622},"asu":{"description":null,"id":623},"bawa":{"description":"If the wind swings onshore NW, then everyone will think about heading south to the remote and fickle right of Bawa, a growling beast that shifts around nastily as it unfolds over a gnarled slab reef. Consistently picks up more swell than anywhere and transforms a solid SW swell into round, cavernous pits through the inside bowl section. Challenging, powerful wave for chargers and tube junkies and a regular escape from the Lagundri circus.","id":624},"lances left":{"description":"Like yin is to yang, this muscular left is the perfect foil to it’s more famous righthanded brother. When the wind is in the E and there’s a sniff of S swell, up to 3 defined sections will wrap into the bay at the bottom of Sipura island, delivering anything from small lumpy walls to warp speed barrels at the top, centre and tail of the reef. Shifts mischievously in overhead swells and suckers the greedy into a corrugated end section that’s both beautifully hollow and unmakeable in equal measure – get out while the going is good! Mid tide is best and it will handle beyond double-overhead for the hellmen. Super-consistent so often crowded these days, although the shifting line-up looks after those who wait wider for the guaranteed sneaker sets. Getting caught inside on a big day is terrifying - use the keyhole if you end up on the reef. ","id":625},"macaronis":{"description":"Machine-like, fun park left with all the rides. Barrel-riding, lip-smacking, air-popping and wall-gouging are religiously practiced by the hordes who come to ride the Mentawai’s most ripable and apparently the world’s funnest wave. The coral platform curves alluringly into the deep bay and the speed at which Macca’s peels is fairly predictable, starting with a perfect pipe section and often ending with a ruler-edge quarter pipe wall. Jostling at the take-off is a given and it is easy to get pushed too deep when it’s smaller. Looking further up the reef it sometimes looks doable and unlikely stories of pros making it right down the reef exist. The reef is sharp and shallow, but somehow less threatening than comparable depth spots. Getting caught inside will usually result in being flushed to the end if the sets are pouring through. Best at head and a half of SW swell, mid tide and E wind, it maxes out at double overhead, when the tubes go square, but will still be fun if there is a direct onshore SW wind. There’s a land camp, good anchorage, viewing tower and a constant supply of hungry surfers wanting their own plate of carbs!","id":626},"sibigau rights":{"description":"North wind escape spot that rarely lines up needing more W in the swell to wrap in stop start walls along an ill-defined reef. Higher tides will be relaxed shoulders at half the size and regularity of Thunders around the corner, but offers an option for intermediates and crowd-free waves. There’s a psycho right wedge on the other side of the calm bay, but a few badly placed coral heads scupper a promising beginning.","id":627},"e-bay":{"description":"Lush, lefthand smoker with perfect form, especially when there’s more W in the swell and E in the wind. Tight take-off zone concentrates the crew who must do exactly that to avoid a brush with the coral that menaces at lower tides. Vert drop, quick turns then a race to the safety of the channel under the curtain, avoiding the 2 big rocks at high tide and praying that the exit doesn’t shut down at low. Handles all size swells but it’s really fickle so dont expect to score it on a 2 week tour. Lesser surfers should stick with Pit Stops and Beng Bengs.","id":628},"ujung bocur":{"description":"The waves range in scope from heavy, dredging barrels to long carveable down the line performance walls.","id":629},"pangandaran":{"description":"The long crescent of sand at Pangandaran Beach is home to seemingly endless beachbreaks that face S/SW so receive all available swell and are almost never flat. The set-up is remarkably similar to the Kuta/Legian beachbreaks in Bali, with wave quality depending on sandbank shape and swell size (closeouts are common with swells over 4’). During the dry season the sandbanks at Airports near the airstrip are best early mornings before the SE trades mess it up, and the waves get progressively smaller and cleaner as you head up the beach towards the nature reserve, making it a perfect learning curve. ","id":631},"cimaja":{"description":"Tucked in a corner between rivermouths, this rocky shelf offers some outstanding right bowls when there is some W in the swell and either no or N wind. Attracts regular footers from as far as Jakarta so is often crowded with a bit of vibe, but the low tide barrels are worth a wait. Watch out for rocks and poor water quality after rain.","id":632},"ombak tujuh":{"description":"Ombak Tujuh translates as Seven Waves and is definitely the big wave spot, capable of holding swells up to 20ft (7m). The coral ledge protrudes into deep water, forcing the waves to jack up suddenly, making for elevator drops, right by the cliffs. Big wave experts only as the power and deepwater hold downs are serious, keeping crowds thin on big days. Needs a big swell to perform and longer pintails are a good idea.","id":633},"one palm point":{"description":"World-renowned left holding some of the longest barrels on earth in a pristine wilderness setting. It is super-shallow, very dangerous and hard to get to. Low tide equals suicide for all but the pros and mere journeymen have to wait for mid tide and/or smaller swells to make it from the air drop to deeper water in the channel. Requires a fairly high line to stay out of trouble, making it a real backhand challenge. Can be incredibly long when aligned on S-SW swells and any E wind.","id":634},"super suck":{"description":"Maluk Bay is the home of Super Suck, which continues the West Sumbawa pattern of a deep, cliff-lined bay, waiting for a bigger SW-W swell to show it’s world-class colours. The name says it all, especially at low tide, which is usually only surfed by bodyboarders or the very best tube technicians and depth is measured in inches. Take-offs are beyond critical and require an angled, straight into the barrel approach, which briefly lets up before increasing speed towards the inevitable straight reef shut-down. A resort and some cheap losmens hold the bulk of the keen, patient crowd, bolstered by boats descending when this fickle wave finally fires. Crowded and intense. ","id":635},"palau rote":{"description":null,"id":636},"cloud 9":{"description":"Cloud Nine is a perfect, top to bottom, barrelling peak that’s short but sweet when the conditions align. Ideal swell direction is NE, as too much E tends to by-pass Cloud 9 a bit and focus on the adjacent reef of Quicksilver, while too much N can slam it shut. Higher tides also improve makeability as the coral lurks challengingly close to the open air. W wind holds up the coveted rights nicely and although the lefts are shorter, they are just as hollow off the peak, before quickly shutting down. Sucks in the swell and can handle pretty large faces before maxing out. Confident, nimble, experienced surfers will love it, while intermediates may struggle.","id":637},"badoc point":{"description":"Badoc Point, right in front of the grass-roofed main house breaks very close but is rare. It can be intense on a typhoon swell and the beachbreak can also get pretty good. ","id":638},"jardim do mar":{"description":"Once named the best big-wave pointbreak in the world by Surfer Magazine, Ponta Jardim now suffers severe backwash at mid to high tide from a new seawall built in 2003. The break still has its days when the critical drops lead into long, fast, powerful walls, but they are much less frequent and only last for a few hours around dead low tide. Experts with pintails only.","id":639},"pohnpei (palikir-pass)":{"description":"Waves break out on the barrier reef or near a reef pass, so it’s boat access only and it’s always shallow on the inside. Up to 4ft (1.2m), the waves are user-friendly, but once the surf gets bigger, things get serious quickly. Late take-offs, fast down-the-line rides, and hollow barrels are what most surfed spots offer and the best of them is P-Pass (Palikir Pass). This wave has become the star of the Western Pacific by occasionally churning out impossibly perfect righthand pits, attracting pros and chargers to this remote island when the forecast looks right. It takes any swell from W-NE, with straight N being the best direction to avoid close-outs from the NW or missing the reef from the NE. P-Pass works with no winds or with light NE-E trades, which blow dead offshore as the swell lines wrap around the reef. These rights can be surfed at any tide, but it does get very shallow on a full low tide. ","id":640},"fajazinha":{"description":null,"id":641},"cozumel":{"description":null,"id":642},"2nd street (tybee island)":{"description":"This crumbling wave has a little less power than 17th Street to the south. It needs a 20mph NE wind to break, so it doesn’t get hollow, but it has a good workable face. High tide results in a nasty backwash. ","id":643},"pleasure point":{"description":null,"id":644},"dakar":{"description":null,"id":645},"ponta preta":{"description":"The best wave, 30 minutes walk from Santa Maria, is Ponta Preta, which has long rights peeling for up to 300m over sharp, black boulders. Barrel sections, speed walls and wind whipped copings are shared out between the surf and wind crews. It’s best with a decent NW swell, low tide and when the usual sideshore wind is light. There’s also an awesome, even hollower left off the outside peak, but it’s exposed to the wind and closes-out suddenly on the barely submerged rocks so experts only.","id":646},"la barqueta":{"description":"Breaks on all swell directions. It only real down side is that it normally closes out especially when the predicted swell size is 5ft or greater.","id":647},"hamilton":{"description":"Updated to cover north facing breaks. New spots cover south facing coast.","id":648},"phuket":{"description":null,"id":649},"carolina beach":{"description":null,"id":650},"navarre beach":{"description":null,"id":651},"similan islands":{"description":null,"id":652},"lista":{"description":"Lista is a low-lying peninsula on the southern tip of Norway similar to the flat Jæren area. Super-wide swell window means a couple of these places can produce decent set-ups given the right wind-swell combination, preferably a SW - W swell and N winds.   ","id":653},"unawatuna bay":{"description":null,"id":654},"sunset":{"description":"Past Kammieland, a fun near-shore peak opposite Kammies Market, the famous Sunset Beach starts it's curve northwards. Incorporating Vals, Inside Bowl, West Peak, Middles and Sunset Point on the inside, this break has more personalities than reality TV. Under headhigh, NE windswell will still break at The Point, then overhead, W-NW swells start popping up over the fingers of reef at Middles, before double-overhead awakens Inside Bowl and maybe West Peak on a long period W-NW swell. Sunset's default mode is unpredictable as N swells will break up along the ragged hem of reef, while W will launch threatening slabs from wide, punishing the reckless in the turbulent inside. When the long, roller-coaster rights lead into the hollow Inside Bowl, board, leash and body snapping power is apparent, with many shutdowns and unmakeable sections before the wave fattens out into the channel. The real difficulty is trying to get a bomb set off the entrenched local crew on large boards who dominate, leaving mere mortals to dodge the bullets on the inside. 15ft Hawaiian for upper size limit when Outside Backyards sets start to wash through.","id":657},"rocky point":{"description":"Between Tetas and Coronado at Punta Barco, Rocky Point needs just the right size swell to be breaking without closing out. It’s predominantly rights but there are a few lefts too. ","id":3257},"velzyland":{"description":"Almost a mile north of Sunset is Velzyland, perhaps the most localised and intensely crowded spot on the strip. Outer reefs like Phantoms filter the swell size before it reforms and lurches onto a sharp lava reef, spinning fast right bowls and shreddable walls before hitting a positively square inside barrel section. Less competitive, shorter lefts can be had, but there's no paddle channel to get back out. Mid tide, light SE and small to medium NW swell best. ","id":659},"hale'iwa":{"description":"The town of Haleiwa provides a variety of facilities and amenities and is the commercial centre of the North Shore as well as being the breeding ground for many of the best Hawaiian talents, both past and present. Pulling up at the Ali'i Beach Park on a small day may be deceptive as broken peaks look easy, but when an overhead W-NW swell hits, a challenging, powerful right jumps the reef, outputting lightning fast walls and hollow hooks through to a shallow, inside shutdown section called the 'Toilet Bowl'. ","id":660},"ala moana":{"description":"Sombrillas or Ala Moana lefts get really good when strong southerly swells hit the area. It has an easy paddling channel and winds are offshore most of the time. The lefts prefer S in the swell and it can have some faster walls and the odd hollow section. Off the tip of Playa Agua Dulce. ","id":2266},"queens/canoes (waikiki)":{"description":"Queens & Canoes are fabled fun Waikiki reefs packed with all kinds of surf crafts. Queen's rights offer ripable walls up to 6ft over forgiving reef, while Canoes can handle bigger, mushier waves for longboarders and learners. Neither like big swell or wind and it is fair to say this could be the most crowded line-up on the planet most days.","id":662},"pacific beach":{"description":"We don\\\\\\'t have any details about Pacific Beach at the moment.","id":663},"oceanside":{"description":"Decent beachbreak peaks at the Oceanside Pier and down the beach to the south. Hollower at low tide, mushburgers at high. Best with a peaky S swell.","id":664},"newport beach":{"description":"Long stretch of beachbreak interspersed with several short, rock jetties. Popular sandbars lie at the ends of 36th, 54th, and 56th Streets. Hollow, peaky, and very crowded. Holds up to a few feet overhead. Best during summertime S swells, but can be good at any time of the year. ","id":665},"carmel beach":{"description":"Decent sandbar peaks up and down the beach. Best with medium-high tides and small, clean, wedgy swells. Lots of room for everyone. There is an extremely rocky point at the southern end, which is occasionally rideable and gets crowded. Rocky point a half mile south serves up the best waves amid ample portions of local attitude. Offshore with E wind. ","id":666},"cuyagua":{"description":"One of Venezuela best beachbreaks is Cuyagua, where the hollow waves near the rivermouth hold some size and it’s quite uncrowded during the week. Good camping and party scene. ","id":668},"tavarua - cloudbreak":{"description":"Once the exclusive domain of well-heeled surfers able to pay the hefty daily rate to stay at the Tavarua Island surf resort, the Fijian government recently changed the law which allowed the resort to control access to this now legendary reef pass. While the perfect pictures of Cloudbreak suggest flawless left barrels for one and all, this is a tricky wave with multiple sections and a malevolent side that keeps even the best surfers on their toes. The outside section at the top Point of the reef holds plenty of size and the vertiginous roll-ins lead into a flying wall section where speed carves are possible. Middles is where turns are less useful and the barrel starts to wind up, covering a lot of distance in a short time. Insides, or Shish-kabobs, is where the reef gets extremely shallow and the tubes get extremely... extreme! Less confident surfers thinking they can pick off a few on the inside are not going to find any easy rides here and the fingers of razor sharp reef are far less uniform than further out. The 3 sections rarely link up, but when they do, usually on a long period, SSW swell of epic proportions, it is one of the seven wonders of the surf world.","id":669},"daytona beach":{"description":"This used to be the hot spot back in the ’60s and ’70s but the crowd has drifted south to greener pastures. Same deal as Sunglow, except there is a chair lift along the length of the pier. Pity it doesn’t drop you out the back when it’s big.","id":670},"kailua":{"description":null,"id":671},"folly beach pier":{"description":"Occasional long lefts off the southern side of the pier on a NE swell. Mid tide incoming will see steeper, hollower, shifty peaks that will get a bit mushy at dead high if it’s not very big. Low tide will close out over 4ft (1.3m).  ","id":672},"hustadvika":{"description":"A few hard to find spots near Hustadvika breaking over rock shelf on NW swells.  Mostly short, but hollow, punchy waves benefitting from deep offshore trench, plus an inconsistent mellow beachbreak.","id":673},"unstad beach":{"description":"Beachbreak that suffers a bit of swell shadow compared to the two pointbreaks that flank it. Breaks over sand and some scattered boulders but is fine for beginners and the local surf school.","id":674},"ocean isle beach":{"description":null,"id":675},"hosta":{"description":"The main North Uist break is Hosta, which faces northwest and is usually small and soft, but on the right swell, it can fire. ","id":676},"kitty hawk":{"description":null,"id":677},"karmøy":{"description":null,"id":678},"tywyn to aberdovey":{"description":"Huge stretch of average beachies.","id":679},"puerto armuelles":{"description":null,"id":680},"holden beach":{"description":"Same deal as Longbeach and still no chance of N swells wrapping around Cape Fear. Offshore in any type of northerly wind, it can hold good shape in a summer southerly swell.","id":684},"achill island":{"description":null,"id":685},"thorli (porlackshöfn)":{"description":"Thorli is the most surfed place in Iceland, thanks to its deep paddling channel (no duckdiving!) and ability to handle all swells above chest high. Crumbly cutback corners when small turn into really long, workable walls at size. Rarely perfect, never closes out and 40 second rides are possible, with a few  inside sections known to locals as siggi´s point  wall up again and again.","id":686},"sandvik":{"description":"This place picks up alot of swell.  It can get really heavy. Usually once it gets a bit of size it will break way outside and then break again closer to shore.  ","id":687},"playas (guayaquil)":{"description":"Usually better are the powerful, long rights of El Pelado need a good swell to work, but not high tide, as it breaks too close to the rocks to surf. ","id":688},"fort pierce":{"description":null,"id":692},"dublin area":{"description":null,"id":694},"kraakevika":{"description":null,"id":695},"florence":{"description":"Just south of the exquisite Heceta Head and lighthouse, Highway 101 sweeps inland to bypass some 50mi (80km) of coastal sand dunes, interrupted in only a few places by major rivermouths. The northernmost of these is the Siuslaw, and the nondescript town of Florence perches on its final bend before emptying into the Pacific between massive rock jetties. The South Jetty juts out and angles to the south, creating a sheltered nook to ride S and SW swell waves on small N-wind summer days. On big W swells at lower tides, there’s a good left that peels between the jetties (breaking off the south jetty), which can be about a third the size of the outside swell. To get to the south jetty, cross the river to Glenada and turn into the Oregon Dunes National Recreation Area. Follow the narrow blacktop for about 5mi (8km). When it disintegrates into a moonscape of giant potholes, you’re getting close. Walk out on the jetty and check both sides.","id":696},"honolua":{"description":"Classical outer island perfection that often makes it into the top 5 waves in the world list. It's combination of length and ultra round cylindrical sections set in the beautiful amphitheatre of the cliff-lined Honolua Bay make it a perennial favourite of all who are lucky enough to surf it. The first section, Coconuts, breaks in front of the cliffs with the most size, accompanied by the most wind as the trades are funnelled down the valley. It then wraps into the bay where it hits Outside, the next hollow section. It'll either result in a classic barrel or the lip will slam down and propel the unlucky towards the infamous Cave stretch, where many a surfboard met an untimely end in the pre-leash days! Cave is the hollowest and most crowded section, despite being a fair bit smaller than Coconuts and leads into the inner Keiki Bowl. The Bay works on NNE, N, NNW and W swell, while NW swells are blocked by Molokai unless it is big enough to wrap. Honolua is definately a wave for only the most experienced surfers. ","id":697},"ballina":{"description":null,"id":698},"coffs harbour":{"description":null,"id":699},"port macquarie":{"description":null,"id":700},"newcastle":{"description":null,"id":1133},"shoal bay":{"description":null,"id":702},"wollongong":{"description":null,"id":703},"atlantic beach":{"description":"One of the few remaining surfing areas at Atlantic Beach, this break will be particularly good when the swell sweeps up the coastline from the SW. Incoming tide best.  ","id":706},"puerto baquerizo":{"description":"As with all small islands swell shadowing in the forecast model is poor. Check the swell direction carefully!","id":707},"cerro gallina":{"description":"As with all small islands swell shadowing in the forecast model is poor. Check the swell direction carefully!","id":708},"seymour norte":{"description":"As with all small islands swell shadowing in the forecast model is poor. Check the swell direction carefully!","id":709},"cape flattery":{"description":null,"id":710},"plettenberg bay":{"description":" Keurbooms is an exposed beachbreak, getting epic on small, clean swell with no wind. Share the lefts and rights with a school of local dolphins in stunning scenery.","id":711},"mossel bay":{"description":"Once at Mossel Bay, there is a wealth of multi-peak bays lined up along the north facing coast of Cape St Blaize. Outer Pool is the pick, throwing up long, wailing walls with cavernous tubes at low tide, washed by a tiring drift down the point. Inner Pool prefers higher tides and is far slower and fatter. ","id":713},"cape st. francis":{"description":"Thanks to the Endless Summer films, we all know about the perfect rights of Cape St. Francis (or Bruce’s Beauties). The wave, though not as good now as in the past, is still a classic barrelling righthander but one that takes a big E swell to kick it into life. ","id":714},"port alfred":{"description":null,"id":715},"east london":{"description":"Countless contests are held at Nahoon Reef, the most popular right point in town. The outside section named Reef can handle very big swells, when huge drops and powerful bowl sections challenge the ever present crowd. Corner, on the inside prefers E swells and any W wind and suffers less from the bad rips and bad shark attack record of Reef. ","id":716},"richards bay":{"description":null,"id":717},"margate":{"description":"Southbroom has very good mainly sand-bottomed rights that need strong S swells and a light SW-NW wind. Easy access attracts occasional crowds - jump in from the rocks.","id":718},"hermanus":{"description":null,"id":719},"red bluff":{"description":null,"id":720},"warrnambool":{"description":null,"id":723},"waitpinga":{"description":"If swell action is close to zero, the final option is Waitpinga, which means “windy place” in the aboriginal language. This beach can be seriously hollow, throwing up epic A-frames that barrel then wall into the many gutters and rips along it's length. Trouble is, it needs offshore or glassy conditions and just the right amount of swell to make it possible to get out the back, so 10ft faces is about the max. Inconsistent and often a blown-out mess.","id":724},"khao lak":{"description":null,"id":725},"stony rise":{"description":null,"id":726},"vero beach":{"description":null,"id":727},"antsiranana":{"description":"Covering the eastern coast of the cape around the Antsiranana","id":729},"ambohitralanana":{"description":"For the coast south of Ambohitralanana","id":730},"scamander":{"description":null,"id":734},"bicheno":{"description":null,"id":735},"fripp island":{"description":null,"id":736},"k59 and 61":{"description":"Two boulder points behind gates that can show good form at mid-tide on a S swell. K59 is much better as it warps across the inside, allowing experts a racetrack and intermediates a fun wall on the wider sets. K61 looks good from a distance but is less lined up, shiftier and a long paddle. Pay for access or stay at the surf camp.","id":737},"la bocaina":{"description":null,"id":738},"la playita":{"description":null,"id":742},"palma sola beach":{"description":null,"id":743},"mawgan porth":{"description":"Fickle beachbreak, best just after low, pushing up to mid tide. Left sandbar off the south end and right off the north side get a bit of extra push from a wedge coming off the cliffs. Normally messy and unrideable unless a perfectly clean, small swell is running. ","id":744},"el zonte":{"description":"El Zonte is dominated by heaps of rocks so it’s safer at high tide. When the swell’s big enough, there are some sucky lefts that can be ridden on the other side of the bay. Mellower vibe than other Libertad breaks. Driving west, the scenery gets dramatic with steep cliffs, mountain tunnels and winding roads. Most of the capes are inaccessible, but a boat trip around this area would undoubtedly be rewarding. ","id":745},"waitpinga beach ":{"description":null,"id":746},"parsons beach":{"description":null,"id":747},"myponga beach":{"description":null,"id":748},"bullies":{"description":null,"id":749},"matches":{"description":null,"id":750},"ethel wreck":{"description":"In summer, when everywhere is flat, Ethels can produce small intense waves over a slabby reef in front of the beached shipwreck. Usually right but can have a real sucky left in the corner of the beach. It’s often too rippy and disorganised, with horrible clean-up sets, but when it’s on, it’s a crowd magnet! ","id":751},"westcape beach":{"description":null,"id":752},"trespassers":{"description":" It’s a long walk out along the cliffs from Baby Lizards tame rights to get to Trespassers, a right with a heavy take-off and good workable wall, that doesn’t like high tide so much. Needs plenty of swell to work and E-SE winds.","id":753},"salmon hole":{"description":"Salmon Hole is a scenic right pointbreak, when winds are blowing from the N, it’s fast, hollow and long, but avoid the suck rock in the middle. If it’s a S wind, check around the other side at Daly Heads which is bloody consistent and can get big, challenging walls. ","id":754},"tai long wan sk":{"description":"In the New Territories, known as Sai Kung province, the 3rd Big Wave Beach is Tai Long Wan SK has the biggest, most consistent and best shaped waves around. Consisting of 4 beaches facing NE to SE in a giant horseshoe bay, the long, white sands of Fung Bay and Sai Wan are probably the best, catching any swell on offer, while Ham Tin offers a little protection at the north end. Can get big, hollow and rippy, so not for beginners when a strong NE or typhoon swell hits. In winter, there is plenty of swell in the 2-4ft (0.6-1.2m) range and the sandbars shift around less. It is not uncommon for waves to break 4’-6’ (1.2-2m) for a week. The best tide is mid to high and there are a couple of small-scale rivermouth setups, but the ride is short and the waves are usually no bigger than 3ft (1m). During a big swell, a classic little 3' left shorebreak can be ridden right in front of the store at Ham Tin. Most surfers camp overnight, since it is 2hrs from the city, eating at Hoi Fung store, nestling among trees on the beach.","id":755},"hualien":{"description":null,"id":756},"taitung":{"description":null,"id":757},"point michaud":{"description":null,"id":759},"isle of palms pier":{"description":"This long, wide, sandy beach is more popular with tourists than surfers. A big hurricane swell at low tide is the best reason to surf here.  ","id":760},"angourie point ":{"description":null,"id":761},"clarence river":{"description":"There is a choice of several consistent pointbreaks around, breaking on boulder/shingle beaches. Clarence River is more of a rivermouth right and works on all tides in medium sized SE-S swells. Sandy Bay is one of the few beachbreaks in the area. It usually works on lower tides with a S swell and is offshore when the NE wind is blowing onshore everywhere else. ","id":4065},"turners wall ":{"description":null,"id":763},"pippi beach ":{"description":null,"id":764},"turners beach ":{"description":null,"id":765},"miller's landing":{"description":"Cruise around El Tomatal fish camp in the area known as Miller’s Landing to find the nice cobblestone right point and a neighbouring left/right reef. ","id":766},"punta sta rosalillita":{"description":"Whenever a really big W swell comes in, Punta Santa Rosalillita is an obvious choice with the point situated to the north of the bay delivering truly classic, extra-long rides and providing several other breaks along the bay. A traveller’s favourite, this small fishing village is earmarked for both marina development (construction of breakwalls in the surf zone has already begun) and as an entry point for a road connection to the Sea of Cortez. ","id":768},"puerto san andres":{"description":"Just up the (bad) road from Punta Rosalillita, Puerto San Andrés receives strong offshores that attract a few windsurfers and surfers looking for real hollow waves. ","id":769},"punto lobos":{"description":"Next door, Punta Lobos looks like an elongated version of El Cordon, complete with wind protection and an even sandier bottom. Sharks have been spotted among the guaranteed numbers of surfers in the line-up. ","id":770},"el cardon":{"description":"El Cardon may be one of the smaller headlands in the area, but rides are actually really long and it is always bigger than Maria or Lobos. Rocky at the tip, sandy at the tail. ","id":771},"punta maria":{"description":"Punta Maria is a class act; a long wrapping right, which can only be seen on major W swells that usually coincide with winter’s offshore NE winds. ","id":772},"punta cono":{"description":"From Punta Cono south, only W to NW winter swells can be relied on. Cono bends these swells a full 180º and fans out endless carvable walls into the wind protected bay. ","id":773},"punta canoas":{"description":"While Northern Baja picks up both NW and S swell, Punta Eugenia and Cedros Island conspire to block southerly swells from much of Bahia Sebastian Vizcaino. Punta Canoas is one of the last spots able to pick up direct SW swells onto a series of points and an outside reef and high cliffs offer good wind protection. ","id":774},"monuments":{"description":"On the east side of the Cabo San Lucas bay lies Monuments, a short, spinning left that works on any S-W swell and is offshore in N winds. Can get perfect, but it’s a tight take-off zone and the rocks and urchins are lurking everywhere. Experience required. ","id":775},"migrino":{"description":"Migrino is a consistent right point that accepts winter swells and summer pulses along the numerous beach peaks. Only a short distance from town so gets pretty crowded when there’s no waves in Cabo. ","id":776},"isla todos santos (killers) ":{"description":"Ensenada is the jumping-off point for Baja’s most famous big-wave spot, Killers, 20km (12mi) offshore on the Islas Todos Santos. An underwater canyon maximizes long period W-NW swell energy down the point, creating huge, powerful and shifty deepwater waves","id":777},"pescadero":{"description":"The Pescadero reefs are close to shore and get the maximum out of the swells, throwing up some nice A-frames. These beaches see few crowds and have plenty of campsites and surf condos but suffer from the midday onshores. ","id":778},"bahia chileno":{"description":"Just past Chileno is El Tule, a righthand reef that is quite consistent yet not too crowded, making the slopey walls ideal for improvers and intermediates.  ","id":779},"las frailes":{"description":"Los Frailes is a large sandy bay with a left reef worth checking in a big SE swell.","id":780},"punta arenas":{"description":"The Punta Arenas area is a long sand point that needs massive S or local storm swell from the N to offer anything other than flat water.","id":781},"misquamicut":{"description":"Masquamicut State Beach needs a S swell to be any good, even though E will get in there. N winds and lower tides should see some decent beachbreak peaks. Some rocky outcrops to the east and west can hold some waves in bigger swells.","id":783},"breachway":{"description":"These inlet jetties won’t handle much size or higher tides. Longer rides than the surrounding beachbreaks, with hollow lefts forming over the inlet sandbars.","id":784},"k38/39":{"description":"The longest left on the East Coast breaks over a mussel bed reef inside the breakwall of the Point Judith Harbor of Refuge. Known as “The Ks” these two deep-water peaks provide long, workable walls on the lefts and shorter, steeper rights at K39’s more eastern take-off point. No barrels, even when it’s as big as it gets, making it a favorite for longboarders and cruisers. S or SE swell only, lower tides, with winter NE’ers being just enough offshore.","id":785},"cow bay":{"description":"Osbourne is a right pointbreak sheltered from all W winds and the long walk down the point can be worthwhile as it can offer very long rides around mid tide. ","id":787},"summerville":{"description":"Summerville’s long white sand beach offers good breaks at both ends, with the south end’s rivermouth regularly producing the best sand bars. ","id":788},"baga beach":{"description":"This forecast is good for most west facing Goa beaches including Anjuna etc.","id":789},"cancun":{"description":null,"id":790},"peñascal":{"description":"Peñascal appears off the southern tip of the wave-lashed San Bartolo headland, doing a scaled-down impression of a big-wave bombora. It arrives from deep and rears up quickly, giving those on longer boards the time to stroke into some serious drops and race along a series of wide walls and grunty lips. Mainly a long right, but there are some lefts depending on the swell direction, although the paddle back out is likely to result in a few on the head. The right can throw up a mean barrel when it is nicely lined-up in a S-SW swell, but it is more of a pedal to the metal wall and compared with Sunset for shape and power. Great fun when smaller on the inside El Bajo section, before getting serious from double-overhead up on the point proper. High tide kills it a bit, but it will handle a bit of onshore wind and works well in a S swell N wind combo, unlike the other lefts around the corner.","id":791},"la isla (punta hermosa)":{"description":"The beach fronting the main resort of Punta Hermosa is flanked by La Isla, a rocky island joined to the land by a causeway. In the middle of the bay, a reliable peak forms on waist-high days and keeps breaking right up to double-overhead. Its starts as a rambling righthand wall, thick at the base with crumbling lip-line and open faces perfect for carves and gouges. As it heads to the inside section, steeper hooks and cover-ups are possible before it fills and reforms into the shorebreak section called La Puntilla further to the right. The left is usually so soft, the whitewash line mirrors the rights and only cutbacks will do. There are waves further out on the exposed point and the bombora reef at Kon Tiki, for those training to ride Pico Alto. ","id":792},"san bartolo":{"description":null,"id":793},"balandra":{"description":"Down the beach from Balandra fishing depot is an exposed, powerful, all tides beachbreak. Handles N–NE–E swells ranging from 2-10ft (0.5-3m) and is ultra consistent.","id":794},"toco":{"description":"To the right of the main jetty in front of the fishing depot, Toco is a super hollow right that breaks only in a N swell. It’s very inconsistent and the locals are all over it when it does break – surf elsewhere. ","id":795},"south coast":{"description":null,"id":796},"yumuri":{"description":null,"id":797},"playa mar verde":{"description":null,"id":798},"puerto rico (cuba)":{"description":null,"id":799},"la habana":{"description":null,"id":800},"cabo de san antonio":{"description":null,"id":802},"northern burma":{"description":"We've no idea if there's any accessible surf here, but the potential is huge!","id":803},"southern burma":{"description":"We've no idea if there is any accessible surf here, but there's bags of potential...","id":804},"central burma":{"description":"We've no idea if there's any accessible surf here but there is plenty of potential!","id":805},"shonan":{"description":null,"id":806},"shirahama":{"description":null,"id":807},"omaezaki":{"description":null,"id":808},"hamamatsu":{"description":null,"id":809},"irago":{"description":null,"id":810},"las galletas":{"description":"South-facing peak that picks up spring/summer swells. Generally mellow, easy walls for beginners, longboarders and bodyboarders, but can pack some punch when it gets overhead. S swell and low tide on the lefts is best but rocks do pop up on the inside. ","id":811},"fisheries bay":{"description":null,"id":812},"warner beach":{"description":"Baggies is punchy and consistent on head-high swells and SW winds, while Pulpit is the other spot to check in the area. ","id":813},"martinique beach":{"description":null,"id":814},"eguchi-hama ":{"description":null,"id":815},"kanehama (kana-hama)":{"description":"When there's not much swell around on the Pacific coastline, the reliable winter beachbreaks like Kanehama are powerful enough to have fun waves, even when the surf is small. Convenient with easy parking, showers and toilets. ","id":816},"scotts head":{"description":null,"id":817},"chincha ":{"description":null,"id":818},"linda mar / pacifica":{"description":"A stretch of rather mushy, flat-bottomed beachbreak mixed with boulders and rocks at the south end, flanked by cliffs. Best about head high at high tide with straight offshore SE wind. Mellow spot for beginners and longboarders.","id":819}," papenoo ":{"description":"Papenoo can provide a fun, hollow range of peaks around the rivermouth, which helps shape some sand and rock bars, along with bringing pollution and a shark problem after rains. Holds the crowd that come in N swells and is usually cool, but there might be some vibe when the left is really firing. ","id":820},"avalon":{"description":"Avalon is well exposed to both SE and NE swells and is a hotbed for talented surfers, making it one of Sydney's most competitive line-ups. When a moderate+ NE swell hits, loping lefts start stomping down the north end and will look picture perfect in a hot NW breeze. Handles some big faces and gets intense at size, while down near the pool is another quality peak that works in all swell directions up to double overhead. Sharp drops at lower tides with plenty of hollow sections on the good days.","id":2930},"deal":{"description":null,"id":822},"sodwana bay":{"description":null,"id":823},"ponta do ouro":{"description":null,"id":824},"ghost trees":{"description":null,"id":825},"boston bay":{"description":"Boston Beach is Jamaica’s first recognized surf spot, offering white sand beach, crystal clear water and its notorious spicy Jerk chicken or pork, which always draws a small crowd of locals, expats and tourists. Lefts wedge off the outside rock or there’s a fat right on the other side of the tight, wind protected bay. Less consistent than Long Bay and perfect for beginners in the usual chest-high soft breakers. ","id":826},"bull bay":{"description":null,"id":827},"sandend (moray firth)":{"description":"Peaks in middle of sheltered cove and occasional left off the reef by the harbour on west side. Concrete pipe can be used to access peak called Shit Pipe in large swells. Timing essential; note conveyer belt rip alongside rocks.  Occasional sucky rights at east end. ","id":828},"enniscrone":{"description":"A fast, hollow righthand pointbreak breaking over a sand-covered reef. High quality wave but needs a solid N swell to fire, as the swell window is limited. ","id":829},"wave buoy 62029":{"description":null,"id":830},"hovden":{"description":null,"id":831},"ko samui":{"description":null,"id":832},"pacitan":{"description":null,"id":833},"brimms ness - the point":{"description":"Fickle, long, left point needs specific swell direction and light winds to work. ","id":834},"lake worth pier":{"description":null,"id":835},"arrifana":{"description":"Beneath the white-washed village and massive cliffs is a busy and very ordinary beachbreak that works throughout the tide, picks up most swell and has wind shelter. The real reason to visit Arrifana is the world-class, right pointbreak at the beaches northern end. Waves here are long, fast and very heavy with shallow boils and barrel sections. It needs to be at least 2m (6ft) to start breaking and holds up to triple overhead. ","id":836},"fort lauderdale":{"description":null,"id":837},"la saladita":{"description":"Any wave that is nicknamed Ubilam because it is a mirror of Malibu must be good. Long, walled-up, crumbling lefts are perfect for the longboard crew when it’s small, yet La Saladita can be a real treat on a shortboard at double-overhead. Works all year-round and there is decent accommodation and surf camps in the area.","id":838},"kovalam":{"description":null,"id":839},"puri beach":{"description":null,"id":840},"lohi's":{"description":"Lohi’s keeps its old Lohifushi name, despite becoming Huduranfushi resort. Being host to 5 WQS events (Deep Blue Open 2001-2005), Lohi’s is a longer wave than Pasta, but not as perfect. The outside section holds the monsoon wind better, while the inside can be a dramatic freight train. Again, if you don’t stay here, you don’t surf here. ","id":841},"sawarna":{"description":"A curve of decent beachbreaks are the backdrop for this long left shelf running down the eastern headland of the bay from Tanjung Layar. This wave has many moods and swells rear up from deep water, shifting around a bit, sometimes more hollow on take-off but generally a fast wall and always plenty of power. Should be more protected from the SE trades, but gets a nasty cross chop on it in the arvo, so get there early. Cheap accommodation in the village or take a boat from Cimaja.","id":842},"wushi":{"description":"Just north of Toucheng is Wushi, a decent black sand beach with south end jetties and some decent rights in winter NE'ers. ","id":844},"el burro (glasbeach)":{"description":null,"id":845},"2nd beach (sachuest beach)":{"description":"Also known as Sachuest Beach, this bay faces SW, catching all the sea breeze windswell. It will handle a bit of size, especially at higher tides. Bigger and better shaped peaks than 1st Beach. At the eastern end, a protected left pointbreak called “The Dumps” cranks up when both the swell and an E wind picks up.","id":846},"muizenberg":{"description":"Spots facing E in False Bay need a huge swell to work, check Black Rocks or Kalk Bay, although these are localised spots. A better option may be Muizenberg, which has fun sloppy waves with enough peaks for everyone and is offshore in NW winds.","id":847},"juno beach":{"description":null,"id":849},"belhaven bay (dunbar)":{"description":"Inconsistent, weak, beginner-friendly beach. ","id":850},"destin":{"description":null,"id":851},"old orchard beach":{"description":null,"id":852},"zuma beach county park":{"description":"Wide, sandy beach with various sandbar peaks; often very hollow and always powerful. Gets epic during offshore winds, funnelled by Trancas and Zuma canyons, and a peaky SW swell. Holds up to a foot or two overhead. Wicked currents and rips. Use caution.","id":853},"point dume":{"description":"Actually the backside of Point Dume itself, which is private and off-limits to the public. Fickle sandbar peaks boasting heavy tubes with the correct angle of S or W swell. Hard-hitting and not for beginners. Nasty shorepound and bad currents, especially during W swells. Access is through the pay-lot at the south end of Westward Beach Road.","id":2610},"austinmer beach":{"description":null,"id":855},"asbury park":{"description":"The stretch from Long Branch down to Loch Arbour through the ritzy and architecturally-diverse suburb of Deal provides some good jetty surf. The left at The Cove in Allenhurst has steep, bowly sections on a NE swell at low.","id":857},"playa escondida":{"description":"The reliable, crowded reef peaks at Playa Escondida (‘Hidden Beach’) are private and access is by boat rented out at Playa Herradura. ","id":2492},"willawahs (guana cay)":{"description":"The northernmost out island in the Bahamas, Abaco is actually a collection of islands but the 10km (6.5mi) long Elbow Cay seems to hold all the popular spots. A way to escape the Elbow Cay ‘scene’ is to head to Willawahs on the main beach of Guana Cay, where a sandy, flat reef shapes small swell peaks for all abilities. ","id":859},"wave buoy 62081":{"description":null,"id":861},"wave buoy 64045":{"description":null,"id":862},"boulders":{"description":"As the name Boulders suggests, this left breaks over a rocky mix of lava and the odd coral head, in pointbreak style, close to the headland. It is one of Samoa’s classiest waves and handles as much size as the Pacific can throw at it, with triple overhead plus days a real possibility. A steep roll in leads to a flying wall that’s thick and grunty, before turning totally tubular on the shallow end section. Major positive factors include rideable on lower tides and it’s nicely tucked in out of the SE trade winds, which is also the ideal swell direction so only bigger pulses on the wrap will line-up properly.  Negatives include crowds of advanced surfers on big swells as all the surf camps descend by boat and road; getting too close to the cliff at high tide or the inside coral heads at low tide; being under-gunned; the regular shark sightings in the vicinity. ","id":863},"green harbor":{"description":"One of the few places in Massachusetts Bay that is offshore in a NE wind. Big NE to E swell will wrap around a jetty giving mainly lefts and peaks further down the beach at mid tides. Sloppy shoulders and lots of cutbacks.","id":864},"burleigh heads":{"description":null,"id":865},"cayucos":{"description":"Fairly reliable, hollow beachbreak, the best wave being the fast, thin right on the south side of the pier when the sandbar is properly shaped. Although often a close-out, can handle up to a few feet overhead with peakier swells. The lefts can get really good with summertime S swells. Blows offshore on a N wind, making the pier a popular surf spot in spring.","id":866},"jailbreaks":{"description":"First up is Jailbreaks, a right that becomes everyone’s favourite for it’s length and soft-breaking sections. The Jail is gone now, but those staying at Himmafushi guest-house should remember that the area facing the wave is off-limits because of the Drug Rehabilitation Centre. ","id":867},"honky's":{"description":"Honky’s and Sultan’s stand as the ultimate dream combination of rights and lefts breaking on both sides of Thamburudhoo island, which still belongs to the army, so dhoni access only. Honky’s works in the typical NE winter winds enticing swell onto a nicely walled outside section that gets bigger and faster as it hits “Fred’s Ledge” section on the inside. Offers short barrels and a bit more punch than most when the tide drains out. ","id":868},"sultans":{"description":"Impressive, point-style, righthand reefbreak that forms half of the Thamburudhoo Island double act along with Honky’s. Sultans regularly delivers the biggest, longest waves in North Male and is one of only 3 righthanders that will work when the SW monsoon blows throughout the middle months of the year. It starts with a swift, steep, yet manageable drop into a carving wall that throws some nice hooks on the faster inside reef, a full 300m down the line on big SE swells. Handles as much size as this corner of the Indian Ocean can muster, when waiting for a tip to tail bomb will be extremely worth it. ","id":869},"mastic beach":{"description":null,"id":870},"grindavik":{"description":"Exposed, swell-magnet reefbreak with racey right walls at all sizes and some lefts. Friendly at 3ft, frightening at 8ft! Max out size unknown. Heavy water at size with crunching barrels over very shallow low tide reef that gets covered at high. Steep take-offs and bumpy faces unless due N winds.","id":871},"chirimena":{"description":null,"id":872},"melkbosstrand":{"description":null,"id":873},"costa da caparica":{"description":"Stretching away to the south of the Tejo River is a 30 km strip of coast that is the most consistent zone for Lisbon’s surfers. The northern section of this coast is built up and a number of jetties provide variety and stability to the sand bars. Look for the low tide lefts at Covo do Vapor and Rio plus the 7 jetties referred to as CDS. Further south, check Praia da Rainha for average, open beachbreak. ","id":874},"lakey peak":{"description":"Perfect Lakey Peak peels off short, 30-40m lefts and rights into channels either side. The right will often throw up backdoor tube rides but gets too shallow at low tide, when the left is churning out predictable, ideal speed barrel rides. Mid tide lip-smacking sessions will appeal to intermediates and the flattish reef is user-friendly, except during full or new moon phases. Getting out to the Peak is easy with only a short 450m paddle or take the zodiac for around $2 return. Lakey Peak can hold juicy sized waves, but the optimum time to hit it is when it's in that perfect headhigh plus range. ","id":875},"nihiwatu":{"description":"The often debated case of Nihiwatu is quite unique in Indonesia, since the deluxe resort claims exclusive use of “Occy’s Lefts” for the happy-few who can afford $236/454 per day staying in beautiful cottages with 8 surfers max. As founder Claude Graves puts it, it’s a way to avoid the usual surf-slum scenario and generate more benefits for the local communities with the help of the Sumba Foundation. Lefts work on any size, the bigger the better and get really fast and hollow at low tide. There are fat righthanders across the bay from Nihiwatu and there are Sunset style rights and lefts on the next point that can be accessed by boat or car in about 1 hour. There is also a right hand reef wave at the end of the beach that breaks on small days and is a half hour walk away.","id":876},"watu libung":{"description":null,"id":877},"bingin":{"description":"Bingin is best described as short, sharp and shallow. The tight take-off zone at the end of the shelf beneath the impressive Bukit cliffs is always packed with goofy’s trying to nail the backdoor take-off and kick out before the dry reef shutdown a mere 50m later. All tides are do-able but high is fun and low springs is tempting fate. ","id":878},"puerto sandino":{"description":null,"id":879},"jenness beach":{"description":"Predominately a longboard spot, Jenness holds all swell directions and tides. Average peaks, best on a mid to incoming tide.","id":881},"playa venao":{"description":null,"id":882},"capbreton (la piste/vvf)":{"description":"With semi-submerged blockhaus scattered in the sand and a large dune system keeping the suburbs in check, this is one of the most photographed beaches on the coast. Perfect barrels are regularly on offer for those that can handle the packs of gifted locals and tube-hungry visitors. From low to mid tide is prime time, when the swell focuses on banks that seem to have a bit more punch and urgency than just about anywhere in Hossegor, so prepare for air drops and some solid floggings when it reaches headhigh plus. There will be more sand-dredging peaks up towards the massive VVF camping village, where more space is not necessarily guaranteed. Needs more swell energy than the open beaches to the north and hates the onshore wind, but when it is on, it's top quality. ","id":883},"contis-plage":{"description":"Saint Julien en Born's mellow beach resort. The lighthouse provides a birds eye view of the best sandbanks, especially those to the north, close to the bunker or rivermouth. ","id":884},"cap de l'homy":{"description":"Located in the municipality of Lit-et-Mixe, there’s not really a cape, just more straight beachbreak that benefits from some swell angle or chopped up summer windswells. More performance oriented waves perfect for beginner/intermediates. ","id":885},"st-girons plage":{"description":"With 12km of beachbreak to choose from, this popular place serves up something in between Hossegor barrels and average beachbreak walls. ","id":886},"moliets plage":{"description":"The central beach soaks up the summer crowd on very shifty sandbanks that often shut down. High tide is usually no good. The Huchet River mouth from Leon Lake can shape some nice lower tide sandbars. ","id":887},"ondres plage":{"description":null,"id":888},"les culs nus":{"description":"The link between the normal beachbreaks to the north and the heavy shories of La Graviere. Usually better at mid to high tides with a moderate swell, because of the steeper beach angle. Powerful action close to shore. ","id":889},"les estagnots":{"description":"Top quality peaks when a good W-NW swell hits the sand. Handles a bit more size than Bourdaines and Penon, but expect severe long-shore drift when bigger. High tide inside banks can be hollow and fast. ","id":890},"les cavaliers":{"description":"Peak summer/autumn season often sees over 100 surfers in the water, looking for tubes rivalling those of Hossegor or simply something to surf when everywhere else is flat. Handles stronger swells that focus nicely through the rivermouth and unfurl over the outer banks at low tide, before edging inside and ending up as proper shore-dump for a couple of hours at high. ","id":892},"sables d'or":{"description":"Swell angle often dictates whether the longer rights or hollower lefts will be better and powerful tubes appear on the good days. May seem a bit easier to get out when the swell jumps and the jetty rips can help avoid a pounding. Handles all tides and a bit more swell than the open spots just to the north before closing out beyond the jetties. Better chance of scoring outside of summer, when crowds can be crazy.","id":893},"cote des basques":{"description":"The birthplace of France's surfing scene remains popular with longboarders enjoying mellow walls sheltered from northern winds. There's usually a peak close to the headland and another defined peak a bit further down the beach. While it is friendly and fun-loving for mals and beginners at knee to shoulder-high, there is a bit more energy at headhigh plus, especially if you drift south. The offshore islands filter and organise the swell a bit, but it is mainly a summer spot that is still rideable in the afternoon onshores. ","id":894},"ilbarritz":{"description":"Better known for golfing and dining-out, Ilbarritz also hosts a couple of beaches that can produce good waves even though the reefs don’t look very appealing. On a dropping tide, the scattered rocks can help start off a corner to ride, but more often than not it is ill-defined and a mushy closeout. ","id":895},"guethary":{"description":null,"id":896},"masirah island":{"description":"Covers the whole east coast of the island","id":899},"banana point":{"description":"Small beach tucked between the usually dry Tamrhakht rivermouth and a cape offering some N wind protection. A long easy right can break from the point, otherwise it’s a beginners beachbreak, which explains the surf schools in the village.","id":900},"foz do lizandro":{"description":"Much of the time this river mouth spot is deserted and a good place to go for lower quality, empty waves. Occasionally, the sand bars line up properly and then this wave turns into a classy affair with long and hollow lefts. Best from mid-low tide on a small to moderate SW swell with light E winds. ","id":901},"springmaid beach":{"description":"Just north of the good campground in Myrtle Beach State Recreation Park, this non-restricted all-day surfing beach and pier usually gets crowded in summer. It’s more of a shorebreak since hurricanes have cleared out the sandbars. Swell direction dictates whether the lefts or rights are better, which can break powerfully and close to shore.  ","id":902},"kandui":{"description":"The perfect name for the most difficult and technically demanding left in the Mentawai. A seemingly endless fringing reef stretches down the west coast of Karangmajat Island causing cylindrical, lefthand barrels to wink at viewers anchored on the NW corner. The featureless line-up makes it hard to know if you are in position and only an air-drop to full tilt, in the barrel, speed pump will be good enough to get into the wave and have a chance of weaving through some of the cavernous sections that spin off down the 500m straight reef. Rarely backs off enough to allow turns, this is a tube-fest of the highest order. Perfect conditions are SW swell, light E wind, mid to high tide and at least 8ft faces as the reef is bloodthirsty when small. Not too consistent, not too crowded and not for everyone!","id":903},"rifles":{"description":"Gun barrel, straight shooting, take no prisoners, righthand super-sprint. Riders have to maintain faster than a speeding bullet mentality to keep abreast of the constantly peeling sections and ahead of the foamball. It’s not always perfect, often shutting down unmakeable sections, but when it aligns, it’s one of the best waves on the planet. Slack or light NW wind, due S swell, not low tide and head to double over provide the opposite conditions to No-Kandui and a regular footers dream wave. Turbo charged advanced surfers only.","id":904},"anchor point":{"description":"A medium to large, long period NW swell is what’s needed to light-up this world-class right, first surfed by Aussies in the 1960’s. From the steep take-off at the outside peak, a seemingly endless succession of speed walls and cutback hooks present themselves. Occasional emerald green rooms appear on the sandy sections down the point. It’s easier to come in at one of the coves and walk back to jump off at the end between sets. Works on all but high tides, unless it’s huge, which is when it may be possible to ride back to Tarhazoute. ","id":905},"cortegaca":{"description":null,"id":906},"1st beach (eastons beach)":{"description":"NE to NW winds and mid incoming tides for this soft beachbreak. A long, gently-sloping, shallow bay causes things to break up outside as it gets over 6ft (?m). Best on a SE swell.","id":907},"keramas":{"description":"Jet-set plaything and new pro contest hangout as its reputation for barrels and high-octane performance ramps grows. Picks up plenty of east coast swell and focuses it on a jagged lava reef that opens up straight from the drop then just asks to be bashed before the wave closes-out on the inside. Sometimes can barrel all the way or else leaves an open canvas for progressive moves and large punts on the steeper shut-down end section. Keramas is tidally sensitive, preferring higher, incoming tides and light morning land breezes. ","id":909},"las flores":{"description":"Intermediate to experienced surfers will focus on Las Flores (or Punta Silla), a Salvadorian dream set-up and one of the premier surfing locations in Central America. Compatible with the largest swells and always better at low tide, the waves first wrap around a rocky point full of palm trees, jack up over the take-off rocks, then reel off down a sandbar offering more speed and barrelling sections. Lengthy rides up to 300m are common, but the increasing crowds make it hard to get priority. Mellower shoulders at high tide but still fun.","id":910},"punta mango":{"description":"Punta Mango is the main attraction, an epic right pointbreak peeling over barnacle encrusted cobblestone. With a solid S-SW swell and an incoming tide, hollow racetrack walls deal out juicy barrels  to the inevitable crowd of boaters, especially at its ideal size, from head-high to double overhead. It’s possible to drive during the dry season, but the bad roads and thefts make the 30 minute boat ride from El Cuco advisable.","id":911},"carcavelos":{"description":"The original and still one of the best Portuguese surf spots, Carcavelos is a awesome beachbreak. Beside the fort at the eastern end, cylindrical lefts roll over shifting sandbars, attracting seemingly every surfer in the city and most of the foreign surfers on the Costa Estoril. Best on a SW swell, when power intensifies and the occasional right appears. ","id":912},"careneros":{"description":"The boat option is best used to navigate around the slim island of Careñeros to check the surf at its northern tip. This left pointbreak peels down the east coast of the island, for a ride that can top 200m (600ft). It's usually a mellow wave, but it holds size and can have some long tubing sections. The more adventurous (and budget conscious) can paddle to Careñeros from Bocas, then walk around the island. ","id":913},"playa santa teresa":{"description":"Playa Santa Teresa has quickly become a mainstream spot because this white sand beachbreak is hollow and consistent, especially at lower tides. Stay at Cabinas Sta Teresa to be right in front of the surf and beat the Mal Pais crowds.","id":914},"bank vaults":{"description":"Fear inducing righthander that bends and warps over the exposed, swell sucking tip of Pulau Masokut. Deceptively fast, shifting sections look makeable from the channel, but only the real chargers will handle this complex line-up. Gets better when it’s double overhead or bigger and expect to get pinned on the “get me outa here” inside reef as the sets refract from wide, cutting off the escape to the channel. South swells and winds are sketchier, but tide doesn’t faze it. The left around the other side of the tip has been surfed, but is dangerous without the right’s rewards. Intermediates should head straight to Nipussi.","id":916},"thunders":{"description":"This left rumbles in from deep water exudes more power and heavy water characteristics than most Mentawai spots. Thick peaks pop up in a range of spots, requiring a bigger board to negotiate the long drop leading to either shoulder hook or inside drainer barrel sections. Refracts heavily, focusing powerful whitewash on anyone caught inside, a situation guaranteed for most surfers. Works from tiny to huge and speed barrel sections can appear up the reef in a moderate S swell, but this is the go-to spot when it’s flat elsewhere. Thunders handles crowds, but not vice-versa, as only the dialled in chargers will suss the shifting line-up. Bonus is it’s nice and deep at all tides and there’s a beautiful beach to wander along and see the wave from the front.","id":917},"rag's right":{"description":"Toothy right with a bite to match it’s intimidating bark, this is close to the gnarliest wave in the Ments. Starts with a beyond vert, no mistakes, quick-as-you-can take-off followed by undulating, sometimes square barrels vortexing down a featureless reef where eventually the coral heads are going to appear in the exit. Even experienced surfers will struggle with the endless tube-time over barely damp, beautifully sharp coral, plus the need for constant speed and readjustment behind the curtain. Low tide is suicide (suitide?) and it seems to hug the reef better in more S swells. North quadrant winds or glassy and crowds wont be a problem here - ever!","id":918},"renesse":{"description":null,"id":919},"avellana":{"description":"On small swells, Avellana has a gnarly right reefbreak, imaginatively named Little Hawaii and the beach, scattered reefs and the rivermouth offer great shape, holding some size and the inevitable crowd.","id":920},"praia de sabon":{"description":"Really consistent, summer beachbreak, best at low tide. The right is a swell sponge and handles a bit of SW wind.  Rips. ","id":921},"el palmarcito":{"description":null,"id":924},"los lobos":{"description":"World-class righthand point that peels for up to 400m down side of small uninhabited island next to Correlejo. Very sectioney when small but a big N swell will line up 3 great tube sections and long rides.","id":925},"lobitos":{"description":"Lobitos is another one of those perfectly shaped Peruvian points that when the sand fills in the gaps in the rocks, long mechanical peelers will wall and run for a couple of hundred metres minimum. Hot-dog heaven when it's small with lots of lip climbing and floating to link it up, but it's not much of an out and out barrel unless it is big and the sand is in. Works in winter S and summer NW swells with higher tides making the inside steeper section less susceptible to close-outs. Stays pretty clean most of the time in the S winds, but even if it is a bit bumpy, it will usually yield a few fun rides.","id":926},"strand":{"description":"Beach and reef break. Works best on a pushing to high tide. Can get crowded.","id":928},"hainan":{"description":null,"id":929},"bertra beach (murrisk)":{"description":"Next to Murrisk, beach break, offshore on an easterly wind","id":930},"jennys right":{"description":"Heading south past the slabby, bodyboard only spot of Honey Smacks leads to the fun, chilled-out Jennys Rights, perfect for wall cruising and the odd cover-up. ","id":933},"telescopes":{"description":"Yet another world-class left that offers more flexibility than most waves in the area. The take-off is steep but not ridiculous and allows entry to a flawless, steady tube section then a whacking wall to a bend in the coral shelf where the next slot beckons. It’s predictable and rarely pinches, is deeper than other reefs, can peel for 200m and handles the constant traffic of intermediates and experts alike. When it’s big (up to triple overhead) the outer reef sets rumble in to the entry point with power and purpose - beware of the wide sets pinning you on the reef with it’s swirling currents. Prefers some W in the swell and mid tide will usually produce the epic sesh.","id":934},"canggu":{"description":"North of Kuta and usually a bit bigger are the intermediate-friendly peaks at Canggu. The black sand moves around the reef a bit and sets do shift around, keeping the inevitable dawn crowd on their toes. The inside reef is tricky at low and high tide cuts off the beach in places so mid tide is often best, especially on the lefts. More peaks down the beach towards Pererenan.","id":935},"vale figueiras":{"description":null,"id":936},"el hierro":{"description":null,"id":937},"popoyo":{"description":"When talking about Popoyo it’s important to realise that it is 2 waves with very different personalities a bit like beauty and the beast. Beauty is the alluring symmetry of the reef and sand slab off Play Sardinas that peaks up and peels off predictably at a nice pace for vertical whacks and the odd crumbly cover-up. Better at low incoming tide, the peak will hold up to double overhead and and a considerable crowd as well. The Beast is The Outer Reef, with a capital T, found 400m offshore and is only really an option for the very bravest and skilled big wave riders. Looks deceptively perfect from distance but close inspection reveals shallow rocks, boils and riverine currents sculpting heaving, bloodthirsty barrels with a do or die end section. Easily handles 20ft faces at this higher tide spot and it gets scarier by the minute on the drop, which doesn’t deter the local hellmen that have it wired.","id":939},"playa colorado":{"description":null,"id":940},"scar reef":{"description":"Scar Reef is the main attraction in West Sumbawa, offering multiple barrel opportunities for advanced surfers willing to take a risk with possibly the sharpest reef in Indo. It starts off fast with a throwing take-off, then constant tongues of the lip flick out to swallow you as a series of backdoor sections that demand high speed and clear positioning to thread the wave to the sketchy inside closeout. Its’ personality changes constantly as low tide madness becomes perfect mid-tide bowls, before giving way to fast sloping walls and envelopes at high. Can pick up quickly without warning, sometimes bringing cool, deep water from the channel and will handle beyond double overhead. ","id":941},"matosinhos":{"description":"Two different spots, one is a beach sheltered by a large breakwater, which makes it a good option in massive swells. The other is a much more consistent wave and best at lower tides. ","id":942},"isle of man":{"description":null,"id":943},"harlyn":{"description":"This sheltered beachbreak needs SW winds and a solid winter swell. Best at mid tide, closes-out at low and gets washy at high. ","id":946},"barra da tijuca":{"description":"To the west of Rio is a region with a concentration of high-class hotels and condos and from Barra da Tijuca, a magnificent beach extends along Avenida Semambetiba up to Recreio. Further west is the cove at Prainha, which has summed up the Brazilian surf experience for decades and scene of many contests. Restinga de Marambaia represents 40kms (25mi) of mostly off-limits beachbreaks because of military restrictions followed by Rio’s westernmost surf located on Ilha Grande. ","id":947},"praia da macumba":{"description":"Less crowded than Rio's main beaches. A good quality wave for all abilities. ","id":948},"mangalore port":{"description":"Holds the big monsoon swell from the south, June through to September","id":949},"kumta":{"description":"Holds big monsoon swell, right and left point.","id":950},"mahabalipuram shore temple":{"description":"Coastal armoring to protect the ancient Mahabalipuram Shore Temple has helped catch the sand and funnel some hollow righthanders down the point. Picks up S swells and it bends in, but loses a lot of size in the process so June to September is the time to go.","id":4033},"manapad point ( kulasekharapatanam)":{"description":" On big SW monsoon swells, go east and find Manapaddu. The spot called Alwars at Manapad Point is one the best surfing spots in India. It is far off the beaten track and not so easily accessible. The point is a beautifully formed ancient lava flow that extends into the water and when the rights are working, expect up to a 400 yard ride followed by a long walk back to the point. ","id":952},"rushikonda beach":{"description":"Rushikonda is the number one tourist beach, with nice facilities, restaurants and no shitting on the beach rules, but the surf set-up isn’t great, pushing the swell too wide onto ever shifting outside sandbanks.","id":953},"okaloosa pier":{"description":null,"id":954},"the cross (pensacola beach)":{"description":null,"id":955},"alabama point":{"description":null,"id":956},"pondicherry":{"description":"Holds three to six foot swell, nice right hand wave off the local jetty. Like most east coast spots it gets an offshore wind in the morning.","id":957},"widemouth bay":{"description":"Long, stretch of average beachbreak and reef peaks including Salthouse, Camel Rock and Black Rock. Each spot has its tidal nuance but there is always something to ride. It’s consistent, crowded and a surf school favourite. ","id":958},"duranbah (d-bah)":{"description":"Duranbah or D-Bah sits on the north side of the Tweed River, which marks the border with New South Wales. The rivermouth jetties have helped form powerful wedging peaks that provide ample tube time at one of the worlds finest beachbreaks. D-Bah soaks up the swell and people, making it one of the “Goldies” main surfing focal points. Crowds can be insane because when the Pacific is in the doldrums and the points are sleeping, D-Bah will have thumping little A-frame wedges, somewhere along it's length. Refraction off the breakwall helps to focus power on the peak and it will pick up any swell from NE around to S. Often closes out, but the tube time before is worth it. Huge local crew dominate the line-up, so you might want to check some of the other beaches south of the border for less stressful sessions.","id":959},"chicago (north avenue beach)":{"description":"We don't have any details about Chicago (North Avenue Beach) at the moment.","id":960},"watergate bay":{"description":"Long stretch of fun beachbreaks. Popular with kitesurfers. ","id":961},"milwaukee":{"description":null,"id":962},"racine":{"description":null,"id":963},"new buffalo":{"description":null,"id":964},"sandymouth":{"description":"Consistent, small swell beachbreak best on lower tides. Fast peelers with a bit of power when the banks line up. Consistent and squeaky clean. ","id":965},"newquay - towan / great western":{"description":"In big swells and SW storms the Towan to Great Western stretch can be the only surfable option for miles. Hollow when on but tends to close-out. ","id":967},"putsborough":{"description":"Popular beach with reasonable peaks, well sheltered from SW-S wind by Baggy Point. Rip along cliff useful when big. ","id":968},"polzeath":{"description":"Consistent, slow, intermediate-friendly walls, spread along the beach plus to the north, a reasonable right breaks off Pentire Point at size. ","id":969},"tanjung cherating":{"description":"There’s always a pack on the sandspit lefts of Tanjung Cherating, Malaysia’s best wave, which is about 5h from KL. This long, protruding sandbank takes the NE breeze side-on and although it is not so powerful, Cherating peels for a long way through the brown, rivermouth water. Take-off section can be hollow and it is always better at low tide. Intense rips require constant paddling to stay in position but after a wave it’s a walk back up the beach to access the peak. ","id":970},"sitka (the wall)":{"description":null,"id":971},"yakutat (cannon beach)":{"description":null,"id":972},"kodiak (fossil beach)":{"description":null,"id":973},"squibnocket":{"description":null,"id":974},"long point":{"description":"The locals at Brighton Surf club can advise on where to search in the unchartered waters of The Catlins area. Drive to Long Point on a medium S swell to catch some ledgy lefts. Take-offs can be hairy and walls are fast but it’s very rippable. Farmland access requires permission and respect. ","id":2025},"lucy vincent":{"description":null,"id":977},"abels hill":{"description":null,"id":978},"busca vida       ":{"description":"There are two spots here, the main one is a reef break with rights and lefts. The best swell is from south and southeast. The second break is just 100 metres to the south and is a beach break. Good on a southeast and east swell. Offshore winds from the the north and west. ","id":979},"praia do flamengo":{"description":"There are three spots here, with the best one being the reef. Works on south, southeast and east swells. Best in a northwesterly wind. Very consistent spot which works well from 2ft upwards. ","id":980},"prainha":{"description":null,"id":3875},"boca da barra":{"description":"The highlight of Itacaré surf is Boca da Barra, a super-long, fun righthander that peels across a sandbank at the mouth of the River Contas. On a really big S swell, the first section ‘Boca’ links with Pontal’s hollow walls, resulting in a two minute ride! ","id":982},"makaha point":{"description":"There are four distinct breaks at Makaha: the Point, the Bowl, the Blowhole and the Inside Reef. Rideable at any size, these epic rights become a serious challenge over 10ft (3m). Below that size there is something for everyone with inside rollers picked over by the groms, a nice left off the middle peak for the goofys, long wrapping walls for the charging longboarders and short sharp barrels for the shredders. Out on the point in a solid NW it’s a committed, heart-stopping drop, then full-bore race ahead of or under the axing lip towards the Bowl which may just turn into a cement-mixer close-out. With some luck it can link and reform all the way to shore, but watch out for backwash. Higher tides are preferred and getting caught inside over the reef can be a shallow, skin-threatening experience. Intermediates on small swells, experts with extra testosterone on the dig days.","id":983},"makapuu point ":{"description":"Makapu’u Beach is arguably Oahu's best bodysurf/bodyboard spot with long trundling lefts ending in a huge shorebreak barrel that works best in winter with any E swell and opposing winds. Really strong currents preside, keeping the lifeguards busy, who police the no surfboards policy at the Beach Park, but allow stand-ups to take on the heavy barreling right over the lava shelf at Makapu’u Point, in front of Sea Life Park. It’s also worth being curious about Rabbit Island in bigger NE swells.","id":984},"winkipop":{"description":"Directly next door to Bell's is Winkipop, a long, fast and hollow, point-style reefbreak that can handle solid swells, over the shallow reef. Higher tides, 6-8ft (2-2.5m) and NW winds will create warp speed walls with impossibly long, makeable barrel sections that the locals hunt and slay with consummate ease. Like Bell's, it breaks up into sections with the obvious Uppers and Lowers denoting where along the 400 odd meters of rocky shelf you may be sitting or more likely paddling against the constant sweep of the rip. ","id":985},"carrowniskey":{"description":"One of the most consistent beaches in Ireland","id":986},"playa hermosa":{"description":"Playa Hermosa close to El Sucio.","id":4165},"laguna beach (brooks street)":{"description":"A series of fickle reefbreaks, notably at the ends of Thalia, Oak, and Brooks Streets. Can get good but very crowded when it is. Best during medium-sized winter swells. Brooks Street can be a great left.","id":988},"the pier (pawleys island)":{"description":"Longer lefts on a NE swell at mid to high tides. Gets better on the incoming tide because it generally doesn’t break at low. Shuts down if it gets overhead. Surprisingly crowded for an average-consistency spot. The pier does little to cut the drift.","id":989},"imsouane (cathedral point)":{"description":"This point break works in a west/north-west swell and eastely winds","id":990},"imsouane (the bay)":{"description":"Last stop before Tarhazoute, Immesouane remained authentic until the modern fishing port was built. Fortunately the long, mellow rights keep wrapping into the well-protected south-facing bay, while several well-defined peaks grace the cathedral side.","id":991},"beadnell bay":{"description":"The Bay can accommodate swells upto 12-15ft in size. Usually you choose the Bay due to its favorable wind directions and protected swell. The North end of the Bay needs a big (5ft+) south/south-easterly swell to work well. The middle of the Bay can produce excellent waves through most swell directions and sizes. The far south of the Bay is more open and holds big open northerly swells.\\r\\n\\r\\nThe Carrs reef in the midde of the Bay produces a left and a right that can hold swell upto 10ft easily and can result in quality 150 yard rides.\\r\\n\\r\\nAlways try and get the central to north end of the Bay on the pushing or high tide, the banks are better an the swell gets into the beach over the reefs more easily.\\r\\n\\r\\nThe Carrs reefs need a high tide to work and soon become exposed about an hour and a half after high.","id":992},"manorbier":{"description":"Mellow, high tide right reefbreak and low tide beach peaks in shadow of a Norman castle. The reef handles onshores and is normally crowded. ","id":993},"cantinho da baia":{"description":"Right-hand and left-hand beach break, ideal for beginners.","id":994},"ballito":{"description":"The most popular surfers beach is between Willard\\'s beach and black Rock.","id":995},"sydney (bondi)":{"description":"Covering southern Sydney","id":996},"sydney (cronulla)":{"description":"Far southern reaches of the Sydney beaches","id":997},"north narrabeen":{"description":"Perfect long lefts and shorter rights stalk the semi-permanent sandbank at the mouth of the Narrabeen Lakes, creating one of Sydney's most iconic and reliable waves. The Alley is basically a rivermouth set-up when they bulldoze the sand from the lake entrance and while the rights can be messier and rippy, they still pack plenty of punch. The majestic lefts are just waiting for a NE-E groundswell, NW-NE winds and lower tides to light up the line-up as barrels spin from tip to tail of the triangulated bank down towards the Carpark Rights section. Here the wave changes into a thick, heaving peak that demands skill to avoid the shut-downs and slams on the shallow sandbar. ","id":998},"curl curl":{"description":"Curl Curl is an exposed beach, picking up the most swell on the Northern Beaches and works reasonably well in most conditions, although it’s rarely perfect. Best days will be on peaky E swells, groomed by W winds and mid tides. Soaks up a big crowd along it's length and often suffers from strong rips, which gouge out the sand to combat the Curly close-out. ","id":1000},"agnes water":{"description":"North Queensland indicator","id":1001},"fraser island":{"description":null,"id":1002},"alexandria bay (noosa)":{"description":"Relief from the masses requires a long walk through the National Park to A-Bay which is a consistent beachbreak that picks any swell going. NE-SE wind swell will be breaking here when everywhere else looks flat and the peaks can have some push around headhigh. Exposed to the sea-breezes, SW-N winds will be offshore and it's a classic Qld bush-backed beach that is worth making the effort to surf.","id":1003},"sunshine beach":{"description":"Like Alexandria Bay, Sunshine Beach is another swell magnet with powerful peaks in the lee of the northern headland. Nice holes and gutters help limit the close-outs and there are many access point all the way down through Sunrise and Castaways Beach. Holds it shape OK in the NE'ers.","id":1004},"pin cushion (maroochydore)":{"description":"Maroochydore is the biggest centre on the Sunshine Coast, incorporating some walled up beach breaks and pockets of reef leading down to Alexandra Headland. Avoid the central beach masses by checking places like Pin Cushion behind the caravan park next to the Maroochy rivermouth. WSW winds, all tides and nice SE swell should see some hollow peaks.","id":1005},"kawana":{"description":"Kawana has tons of access to consistent and hollow beachbreaks, sometimes stabilised on the rock bottom. The Corner up by Pt Cartwright is a good spot to go when the NE'er is blowing. Gets overpowered when the swell gets a bit overhead but it's a fairly consistent spot for average open beachies throughout the year. ","id":1006},"point cartwright":{"description":"Point Cartwright’s scenic headland provides S wind shelter for a challenging right point, which shuts down on the eastern breakwall of the Mooloolaba Inlet. Thick walls arch and throw a barrel section on take-off, then it races down the line to the terminal shelf. Further out there’s an even heavier right platform for hellmen only. All tides and winds from SE-W should be ok with any E swell up to 12ft (3m), when it can start breaking past the rivermouth. Inside the usually flat bay on the other side of the river can see some awesome close-out barrels on a big NE swell S wind combo, otherwise it's a good learning area up to Mooloolaba Beach.","id":1007},"moffats":{"description":"The most southerly surf town, Caloundra, has eight spots facing both north and south. Apart from the Ann Street reef peaks and shoredump close-outs of Dickies, The Reef is the premier wave, breaking left way offshore with malicious power. Big boards and big balls for the big barrels! Moffats however, is a longboard-friendly right point with long, crumbly sections, more makeable at higher tides. ","id":1008},"north stradbroke island":{"description":"Consistent beach breaks with long right to north of island.","id":1009},"south stradbroke island":{"description":null,"id":1010},"surfers paradise (gold coast)":{"description":"Surfer’s Paradise itself is more dedicated to swimmers, so don’t surf between the flags as the lifeguards don’t have a sense of humour. In-between the patrolled areas there are various peaks, sometimes slow and mushy, perfect for beginners and sometimes sucky and walled up with hollow bits, often in summer NE swells, when the crowds make it a real lucky dip as to whether you have a good session or not. All tides up to 6ft.","id":1012},"snapper rocks":{"description":"Snapper has had a personality make-over ever since the sand started flowing from the Tweed and is no longer second fiddle to Kirra when it comes to dredgy barrels. It starts from behind the rock, where just a few locals have dialled the launch into a square, thick-lipped pit before the backwash hits and twists the barrel just as it emerges out into the sandy expanses of what has been dubbed the Superbank. A frothing pack of rippers and longboarders then pounce on anything that moves, slashing and mainly burning any surfer perceived to be weak or undeserving. It then opens up to 2 parts wall 1 part barrel as it progresses 200m down towards the next rocks at Little Marley, before traversing Rainbow Bay down to Greenmount for a further 400m of cruise and crack. Swell direction defines the ride with E-SE providing the ideal, since too much S will by-pass the point, losing lots of size and shouldering off into deeper water, while NE will angle in and close-out whole sections of the sandbar and even blow holes in it. Handles pesky S winds well and breaks through the tide, but the sweeping current is always there to drain your paddling power. Beyond the point is Froggies, an insane backwash wedge for the bodyboarders.","id":1014},"fingal head":{"description":"The southern breakwall of the Tweed River can have some peaky lefts in NE swells and offers some summer wind respite, followed by average but uncrowded beachies all the way south to Fingal Head. This bouldery point relies on sand to fill in the gaps and seems to prefer a bit of N in the E swell. Rolling walls and shoulders when small, then gets hollow at headhigh before maxing out at about 10ft faces. Offshore is Cook Island where some slab reef action keeps the local lids happy. ","id":1015},"kingscliff":{"description":"Solid beachbreak","id":1016},"pottsville beach":{"description":"Most of the beaches down to Byron Bay will be fairly deserted, with congregations at spots like Hastings, where a fickle right and left can form on either side of the point, or Pottsville, where variable sandbars will form along a lonely and sharky stretch of coast. Avoid high tide.","id":1017},"brunswick heads":{"description":"The rivermouth breakwalls at the mouth of the Brunswick River do a decent job of holding some sand together and the old adage of north wall in southerlies and south wall in northerlies holds true. North wall has some scattered rocks to help hold a right bank and when it gets real big there is a heavy right that unloads over the outside Bar, deposited by the strong river flow. In these conditions the sweep is legendary and few will tackle it, since getting out the back is nigh impossible. More peaky on the south side with rights and lefts in the summer northeasters. There's even the option of surfing inside the rivermouth at Torakina Beach, where gentle beginner peaks will break when outside is a big mess. High tides are generally fatter when small.","id":1018},"tallow beach":{"description":"For quality beachbreak A-frames then Tallows is the spot, tucked out of the NE winds up at Cosy Corner under the northern headland. It's also the place to be when the swell is small and from the S, bypassing all the Byron spots inside the bay. Power is the key word, with thick-lipped triangles popping up randomly and peeling fast before usually closing-out or hitting one of the deeper channels and holes that scour the long beach. ","id":1019},"evans head":{"description":"Evans Head tends to get by-passed as it is a detour off the Pacific Highway. The breakwall at the rivermouth has its days with some rights protected from the S winds, but it doesn't break with the power or shape of the Ballina 'Walls'. The curious might find better shape over the backbeach called Chinamans and a rarity of a right point breaking off Snapper Rocks (NSW). This knob of a headland was spotted by Captain Cook on his travels (then named after him) and also sports a left in certain conditions before stretching for 30kms down the long, lonely expanse of beach to Woody Head and Yamba. ","id":1020},"brooms head ":{"description":null,"id":1021},"arrawarra":{"description":"Covers the point and beach at Arrawarra plus Corrindi to the north.","id":1022},"emerald beach":{"description":"Solid left and beachbreak, also covers Mullaway to the north","id":1023},"moonee creek":{"description":"Covers the beach, rivermouth and point","id":1024},"sawtell":{"description":"Solid beachbreak","id":1025},"valla":{"description":"Solid beachbreak","id":1026},"crescent head":{"description":"Solid wave, offers protection in southerly winds ","id":1027},"north haven":{"description":"Good beachbreak","id":1028},"old bar":{"description":"Also covers Saltwater to the south.","id":1029},"forster":{"description":"North facing beach, offshore in southerlies ","id":1030},"boomerang beach":{"description":"Solid beach with rights and lefts","id":1031},"anna bay":{"description":"Offshore in northerly winds","id":1032},"bar beach (dixon park)":{"description":"All the breaks south of Newcastle","id":1033},"redhead":{"description":"A less crowded option than further north with a good left","id":1034},"swansea ":{"description":"Mainly mellow rights and lefts.","id":1035},"shelly beach":{"description":"Shelly Beach is a busy but consistent beachbreak ideal for learners and novices. The northern end of the beach can spit out awesome barrels, while the left hand rock shelf holds up to 10ft (3m). ","id":1036},"box head":{"description":"Off the tip of the Bouddi National Park is Box Head, a rare but totally epic left point able to produce rides up to 1500m along a sandbank that forms at the mouth of the Hawkesbury River. Sucky, vortexing barrels or long sectioning slashable walls, depending on the state of the sand, then a gruelling against the current paddle out. Land access after long walk from Hawke Head Drive car park in Bouddi or a very long and heavy paddle from Umina with raging rips and boat traffic so smart surfers from Sydney and the surrounding area reach the peak by boat. As a consequence, it is often crowded. Added to the sharks, currents, boats and jet-skiers, it can either be your best or worse surfing experience ever","id":1037},"the peak (newport beach)":{"description":"Newport Beach has a couple of rock bottomed spots which are in plain view of Pittwater Rd, attracting a hefty crowd to both the The Peak towards the north end and The Reef breaking outside off the sea pool at the southern end. Sand builds up around a platform reef and all swells will trip over it, with NE-E often being the best to bring the favoured lefts to life. Moves in and out with the tide but always breaks with a bit of oomph, offering tubes, hooks and cutback walls in one short package. ","id":1038},"wombarra":{"description":"Also covers northern national park breaks","id":1039},"the farm":{"description":"Offshore in northerlies","id":1040},"bombo":{"description":"Also covering Kiama","id":1041},"seven mile beach":{"description":"Numerous peaks up and down the beach, also covers nearby reefs","id":1042},"black rock / aussie pipe":{"description":"The main reason to hang around Jervis Bay and Booderee National Park is to surf the all-time classic reefbreak Black Rock (aka Aussie Pipe, Wreck Bay or Summercloud Bay). It is one of the hollowest and most photogenic waves in Australia, breaking intensely over a shallow cunjevoi and urchin-infested bottom. As the land went back to its traditional owners in 1955, Pipeline is also the unofficial home of Indigenous surfing and the local surfers can be protective, especially when the crowd appears on S swells and NE seabreezes at mid tide. ","id":1043},"sussex inlet":{"description":"Covering Cudmirrah and Bherwerre","id":1044},"mollymook beach":{"description":"Mollymook has punchy beach peaks, but quality shifts with the sandbanks plus the south end right off the reef can be zippy. ","id":1045},"broulee":{"description":"Indicator spot for the area","id":1046},"bermagui":{"description":"Indicator spot for the area","id":1047},"merimbula":{"description":null,"id":1048},"mallacoota":{"description":"Indicator for nearby beach and reef breaks","id":1049},"cape conran":{"description":"Plenty of beachbreak peaks with a point at either end","id":1050},"lake tyers":{"description":"Beachbreak peaks ","id":1051},"wilsons promontory":{"description":"All the west-facing beaches on Wilson\\'s Promontory","id":1052},"wonthaggi":{"description":"Consistent but shifty beachbreak","id":1053},"point leo":{"description":"Three quality left-breaking points","id":1054},"flinders beach":{"description":"Named lefts and rights proliferate throughout this area","id":1055},"ocean grove":{"description":"Sheltered beachbreak","id":1056},"st andrews":{"description":"Holds more size than Gunna to the south","id":1058},"manzanillo  bay":{"description":"The left pointbreak at Manzanillo packs much more power, with steep drops and long, full speed sections, before shouldering off. Overhead days are safer as the wave breaks further away from the urchin-covered rocks. This is a surf rich area, with other points and a rivermouth as you head north. ","id":1059},"cayton bay - pumphouse":{"description":"Sandbar at lower tides and a mellow reef peak at high in front of the pumphouse between the Point and Bunkers that works best in rare SE swells. ","id":1060},"zarautz":{"description":"Very consistent, good quality, beachbreak.  Doesn’t need much swell to work, although W swells struggle to get in here.  A long beach with several peaks, mostly performance orientated.  Highly competitive in the water with a very high level of surfing.  ","id":1061},"coke's / cola's":{"description":"Another 30 minutes sail north, the last pass is the safari boat favourite because it catches more S swell (and wind unfortunately!). Coke’s (or Cola’s, depending on your taste) has often been rated as the hardest breaking wave in North Male with a vert take-off, high barrel factor and nice shape over the shallow reef. 2 new guest-houses and local crew add to the often crowded vibe and there’s strong currents on the tide drop – experienced, fit surfers only. ","id":1063},"chickens":{"description":"Chicken’s left is home to long, playful lefts that can sometimes produce 10sec barrels, but not if the SW wind is up. Varies greatly in quality and crowds. On major SE swells and strong S winds, it might be worth checking the rights of Meerufenfushi Corner, but expect more than fast zipping lines!","id":1064},"point lonsdale":{"description":"Solid beach break","id":1065},"jan juc":{"description":"Closer to the busy town of Geelong is Jan Juc, a decent, but permanently crowded beachbreak, that’s best avoided at high tide. Packs coagulate around the car parks so walking can help, but it is the busiest spot on the coast. When the sand triangulates, it provides some tasty lips and ramps to launch from.","id":1066},"point addis":{"description":"Indicator for local reefs","id":1067},"hut gulley (guvvos)":{"description":"Solid barrelling beachbreak","id":1068},"point roadknight":{"description":"Anglesea is a typical coastal town that has some decent beachbreaks for the hordes of groms and fun rights at Point Roadnight for the mellow, mal-riding dads. Needs a huge S-SE to be any good since it is nestled behind a long rocky finger, allowing the sand to build up on the lee side and providing protection from SW-W winds. Long rides assured if you are lucky enough to catch this rarity firing.","id":1069},"fairhaven":{"description":"Large beachbreak, solid lefts and rights","id":1070},"wye river":{"description":"Like Kennett, Wye River has both some average rivermouth beachies and an option of a righthand point called Baldy, that has unfortunately lost the sand which previously made it a glorious peeler for hundreds of meters. Better at lower tides to help with the tendency to close-out.","id":1071},"castle cove":{"description":"Picks up any swell going","id":1072},"princetown":{"description":"Heavy spot sandbank dependent ","id":1073},"port fairy":{"description":"Indicator","id":1074},"discovery bay":{"description":"50km of beachbreak peaks","id":1075},"port macdonnell":{"description":"Indicator spot for surrounding breaks","id":1076},"mizata":{"description":"Endless untouched beachbreak stretches to the first of many righthand points at Mizata, which works on any size swell at low tide, to avoid the high tide backwash. ","id":1077},"buarcos":{"description":"A long, high quality right point that is more of a carving wave than a tube riding experience. It needs to be at over a metre (4ft) to wake up and it holds a decent swell. Rides can be several hundred metres long. It’s not badly damaged by north winds and is surprisingly quiet. ","id":1078},"frisco":{"description":"Although the sign on the pier says Cape Hatteras Pier, everyone refers to it as Frisco Pier. Protected from N/NE swells by Cape Hatteras, it works best on anything with S in it. A snappy wave with occasional barrels, it’s offshore in northerly winds and can handle the bigger swells. ","id":1080},"lusty glaze":{"description":"Fun beachbreak peaks on small swells, site of the annual night-surf event. ","id":1081},"rossnowlagh":{"description":"Gentle beachbreak waves perfect for improvers.","id":1082},"the zoo":{"description":null,"id":1083},"luna pier":{"description":null,"id":1084},"south pier - grand haven":{"description":"The Chicago city beachbreaks are best with spring N/NE winds and all the Illinois breaks from Chicago up to Zion will work on a NW wind. Grand Haven is surf central in Michigan, and the South Pier handles the bigger SW to NW windchop, plus there's easy access from the end of the pier and more jetty breaks to the south. ","id":1085},"tamri":{"description":"Located at the mouth of a ‘oued’ irrigating banana plantations, this ultra consistent beachbreak is the go when Tarhazoute is flat. Unfortunately it is onshore in the N winds.","id":1086},"punta conejo ":{"description":null,"id":1087},"shipwrecks - lembongan":{"description":"Iconic Nusa Lembongan break marked by a rusting ships bow on long exposed reef platform. Non-existent at low tide, it starts breaking on the push to mid and sets start rearing up out of nowhere, peeling fast with a high, tight envelope and open shoulder. Gets packed with surfers of all standards so snagging one and avoiding the scratchers is part of the deal. Getting the tide just right is the trick - mid on springs, higher on neaps. Watch out for scrap metal on the reef.","id":1088},"playgrounds":{"description":"Nestled below cliffs offering good SE trade protection, this is the most user-friendly spot on Lembongan. It’s an easier paddle, being closer to shore, continues to break at lower tides, is a little bit deeper and offers more wall to work as opposed to the flat out barrels nearby. The lefts are better with a few lip-bashing opportunities along a tapered wall, while the rights may pitch slightly, but fade quickly. Constant current to paddle against and the whole area is surrounded by a flotilla of cruisers, pontoons and leisure craft catering for the daily influx of Bali tourists.","id":1089},"lacerations":{"description":"Hard core right with excellent, wide open tube time on offer as the tide floods the sharp, shallow reef. It’s a pitching, air-drop entry from the peak into a straight barrel section then a further sucky bowl as it approaches the channel marked by floating mooring lines that litter the bay. Not easy, not long and not empty but it’s more challenging than neighbours Shipwrecks and Playgrounds. Occasionally the lefts are makeable and there are a few more, hollow, ridiculously shallow sections of reef nearby.","id":1090},"central florida hurricane":{"description":"This Hurricane surf forecast uses data specifically designed to pick up accurately the swell generated from intense tropical storms that our normal forecasts can miss. The location is about the same as the Inlet/New Smyrna so you can compare the two forecasts to see how much extra swell a Storm System is set to deliver.","id":1092},"outer banks hurricane":{"description":null,"id":1093},"new jersey hurricane":{"description":null,"id":1094},"new england hurricane":{"description":null,"id":1095},"nova scotia hurricane":{"description":null,"id":1096},"sagres (south)":{"description":"This perfect but very rare wave needs a monster W-NW swell or a decent S. Also picks up a little wind slop on the summertime Levante winds. It’s a hollow, bowly wave that gets very busy and is a little localised.","id":1098},"sandy beach":{"description":"Similar conditions at Sandy Beach, a neck-breaking shorebreak for crazy, talented lids and fins on any E to S swell. Boards can head outside for the shallow left reef, which is usually blown to pieces by the trades.","id":1099},"dunfanaghy":{"description":"Totally protected from westerly gales, Dunfanaghy and Marble Hill Strand both need a lot of N in the swell to work. Rarely breaks, never crowded despite summer surf school/shop. ","id":1100},"el astillero":{"description":"Head to El Astillero where the spot facing the Escalante River has been surfed up to triple overhead. The reef mainly produces long, walling lefts that get hollow and pack plenty of punch. ","id":1101},"el penon":{"description":"A left pointbreak","id":1102},"narragansett beach":{"description":"This is the area of Narragansett Beach that can be surfed year-round. E swell gets in the best, combining with W winds and lower tides to give some good beachbreaks. Further north along the beach there are rights off a sunken barge, lefts off old pier pilings, peaks in front of The Dunes private beach club, and a rivermouth left at the end. Narragansett picks up everything, can be unreal one day and unrideable crap the next.","id":1103},"schiermonnikoog":{"description":"Covering all breaks on the island","id":1104},"ameland":{"description":"Covering all breaks on the island","id":1105},"vlieland":{"description":"Covering all breaks on the island","id":1106},"terschelling":{"description":"Covering all breaks on the island","id":1107},"callantsoog":{"description":null,"id":1108},"julianadorp":{"description":null,"id":1109},"petten":{"description":"This lefthand jetty break gets hollow and fast on SW swells at mid incoming. Protection from S or SW winds.","id":1110},"noordwijk aan zee":{"description":null,"id":1111},"katwijk":{"description":null,"id":1112},"ter heijde":{"description":"More low tide jetty breaks that can shape up a few faster waves on a NW swell. Sloppy when onshore. ","id":1113},"blankenberge":{"description":"The large pier provides stable sandbanks and cuts the howling onshores leaving some decent rights on the east side. Strong rips are common and paddling very close to the pilings or jumping off the end are only for the brave. There is a rare right up at the Zeebrugge harbour wall and some busy peaks down at Blankenberge-Oosterstaketsel.","id":1114},"westende":{"description":"More average Belgian jetty breaks in front of the Westende surfclub. ","id":1115},"juist":{"description":null,"id":1116},"baltrum":{"description":null,"id":1117},"langeoog":{"description":null,"id":1118},"spiekeroog":{"description":null,"id":1119},"wangerooge":{"description":null,"id":1120},"padang padang":{"description":"Benchmark Bali barrel machine and all-round epic wave up there with the best lefts on the planet. Needs major swells to work as it is tucked into the peninsula below the cliffs where the SE trades blow dead offshore. The short 50m ride starts with a pitching lip take-off that sets up into a perfectly cylindrical wall, tempting experts to stand on the tail and see how deep they can push it. Barrel intensity increases as it draws more water off the shallow coral and forces a speed run to the exit before the wave runs out of water. Best described as a bear pit, attracting the biggest and the best grizzlies from the local, expat and tourist hordes. Mayhem when it finally breaks, including drop-ins, snaking, glorious wipe-outs and only lucky experts will manage to get some scraps on a good day. Low is really sketchy, but there will still be someone out there risking their skin. Respect. ","id":1121},"tofino (cox bay)":{"description":"The main Tofino spot is Cox Beach, a crescent beach with tapering walls that line up best in the middle, while each end provides wind protection from the N and S respectively.","id":1122},"tofino (chesterman beach)":{"description":"Sheltered option on big swells","id":1123},"sopelana":{"description":"Very consistent beachbreak with several peaks.  Good semi-permanent high-tide peak at western end of beach.  Works on small to medium swells.  ","id":1124},"dauphin island":{"description":null,"id":1125},"south shields":{"description":"Fun beachbreaks from South Shields down to Marsden. ","id":1126},"marwick":{"description":"A short high-speed ferry trip from Gills Bay to Stromness on Mainland in the Orkney Islands will uncover some more great waves breaking over slabs of slate and sedimentary rock. Picks up W-N Atlantic swells plus NE-SE North Sea swells on the eastern islands although they remain unsurfed. Winds are strong and constant so getting the required E winds takes patience. Highlights include Skara Brae, a long consistent left point opposite Skail Bay an equally long perfect righthander over flat reef. Further north around Marwick are moody slab reefs that amplify the swell and a boulder right point. These are just the known, easy to get to spots and the potential is enormous.","id":1127},"lagos":{"description":"On big S storms it’s worth taking a look at Lagos town beach, which can produce some fun and hollow little beach peaks. The eastern end of the beach picks up way more swell and a W wind is offshore. Best on a SE wind swell. Great beginners zone. ","id":1128},"scarborough - north bay":{"description":"Consistent beachbreak that handles an onshore well. Best at mid tide, backwashes off the seawall at high tide. Various peaks with the middle peak being the favourite. ","id":1129},"salisbury":{"description":"Salisbury Beach faces NE and will pick up any swell from the north. Even a S wind blows offshore here, and the place breaks on all tides. The ideal conditions formula would be head-high NE swell, SW wind, and mid to high tide for some nice sucky, powerful wedges.","id":1130},"playa negra - guanacaste":{"description":"Outstanding rights form off the north end reef of Playa Negra attracting plenty to the mid tide barrels and easy accommodation.","id":1131},"southend on sea":{"description":null,"id":1132},"silecroft":{"description":null,"id":1134},"medewi":{"description":"Slopey, light-lipped left that trundles down a smooth cobblestone and sand point, feeling more like So’ Cal than Bali. Can be the islands longest ride when it lines up on a S-SW swell, with fast crumbling walls and shoulders for up to half a kilometer. Seems to prefer a bit more water, but wont handle SE or NW trades so it’s a typical, west coast, dawn patrol spot. Long, busy 2hr drive from Kuta, so best bet is to stay at the losmens on the point. There’s endless black sand beachbreak and more rivermouths in both directions. All levels.","id":1135},"playa santana (playa jiquelite)":{"description":null,"id":1143},"ponto":{"description":"Used to be a reliable stretch of beachbreak at the south end and on the reef at the north end, which was always the better area. But nowadays, the south end is the best spot, with semi-hollow, shifty sandbar peaks. Directly in front of the jetties, at the lagoon mouth, is a hollow, shallow righthand sandbar. Lots of currents, but it can be a fun spot; popular with young shortboarders. There has recently been a perfect left breaking off the north jetty during S swells.","id":1149},"s*** pipe":{"description":"Fun, split peak reef across the river from Thurso East, more offshore in SW wind. Longer right walls, shorter, steeper left. Untaxing wave suitable for intermediates. ","id":1438},"drivers":{"description":"hollow left, best at mid tide","id":1152},"the edge":{"description":"right hander, best at low","id":1153},"the point":{"description":"Morro Negrito surf camp is close to 2 rocky lefthanders for competent surfers or better. Emily’s is right in front of the accommodation and peels over some sharp reef and barnacle encrusted rocks at variable speed flicking between whackable walls and a few tight tubes. 20 mins walk south is The Point that needs a sizable swell to build some fast, pitching lefts at lower tides. ","id":2512},"barrel rock":{"description":"Crazy barrel a bit shallow on the inside tho!!!","id":1155},"bunmahon":{"description":"Open, south-facing beachbreak that can get hollow and have more power than Tramore. Also far better water quality even though there’s a rivermouth that helps create strong rips. Works all tides if big enough but mid generally best with reforms and shorey action. ","id":1156},"longport, 32nd st.":{"description":"Basic beachbreak surf that favors lefts in a NE swell. Occasionally hollow but never heavy.","id":1158},"las cuevas (la popular)":{"description":"The only city of any size between Mar de Plata and Miramar, Chapadmalal, is home to LAS CUEVAS, which includes a decent left reef, a nice but shallow right and good beachbreak peaks in between. ","id":1159},"pd spot(windmill)":{"description":"Reef","id":1160},"highcliffe":{"description":"Slow, exposed, crumbly beachbreak. Picks up more SW swell than the piers to the west but lacks shape. Inconsistent, so it’s rarely crowded. Rips and submerged objects. ","id":1161},"big wave bay hk":{"description":" Big Wave Bay HK is the centre of the surfing scene, attracting crowds of up to 100 surfers as well as plenty of swimmers, since it is patrolled by lifeguards and shark-netted. Shifting peaks will break in any swell from N to E, and a strong NE typhoon will create some barrel sections providing it doesn’t get too near and close-out the bay over 6ft (2m). Dangers include rocks at either end, strong rips, pollution and too many bodies in the water!","id":1163},"cheung sha":{"description":"Tai Long Wan is kinda remote while Cheung Sha and Pui O get dozens of guys out on occasional 2-4ft days, with lots of closeouts.  Cheung Sha boasts one of Hong Kong's longest beaches, split into Lowers and Uppers by a mini headland, but it doesn’t have the shape of Big Wave Bay LT. It does, however, have a mini bus from the ferry and a small store that rents boards. ","id":1164},"boynton inlet":{"description":"The shorebreak here is under threat from a beach construction project, which will include six T-head jetties. However, about 1/4 mile offshore, an outside bar produces long, hollow lefts when a big NE swell combines with a low incoming tide. There can also be some clean, uncrowded peaks on a SE windchop swell on the north side of the inlet at lower tides.","id":1167},"pariaman":{"description":"Pariaman is a small city near Padang, Sumatra. There are about 4 different spots,they are all breaking left and right. ","id":1168},"cedros":{"description":"A slow left only good on a full tide ","id":1169},"fouesnou":{"description":"Fouesnou","id":1170},"les roches blanches (pointe leydé)":{"description":"A very good left a.k.a. Roches Blanches, with a rocky take-off, followed by a long spinning wall. It needs a big swell and can get perfect in a SW storm. Handles W winds.","id":1171},"puerto morin":{"description":"Windy beautiful bay with left on Cerro Negro side.","id":1172},"los organos":{"description":"Los Organos needs W-N swell to wrap onto a shallow rock ledge, which propagates some short, sharp barrels, mainly to the left, but there are some rights for those don't mind close-outs on the shelf. More tide is a good idea and glassy conditions will help make the drop. Further round the headland back towards Mancora, Organitos has some fun walls for the less experienced.","id":1173},"great yarmouth":{"description":"Doesn\\'t get big very often. ","id":1174},"casernes ":{"description":"Classic Landes beachbreak, all tides depending on the sand","id":1175},"trouville":{"description":"Viking Surf Club members gather at the Touques estuary to surf ‘Le Phare’, a right and left peak where swell size is increased by the polluted river. At high tide a more powerful wave breaks in front of the Aquarium. ","id":1176},"los caracas":{"description":"New breakwaters and seawalls have destroyed a few good surfspots like Punta Piedras, but a few have also been created. Take secret Fido Point for example, where the 2005 Hurricane Emily swell destroyed the jetty, but a short barrelling right now breaks over the ruins. There is a high number of little boulder and rock right points, like Los Caracas, a popular beach about 2hrs drive east from Caracas, where the waves can be excellent near the El Rio rivermouth. ","id":1177},"puerto cruz":{"description":"Puerto Cruz is located between two rocky hills providing shelter from virtually any wind. This right pointbreak reels over a rocky bottom and the long rides it offers are worth waiting for. ","id":1178},"el peaje":{"description":"Beach break. Works best with little or no wind.","id":1179},"rose island":{"description":"Island located in the Bahamas chain of islands.","id":1180},"batts rock":{"description":"The west coast only breaks on the biggest N swells so it’s the least consistent part of the island, but the E trade winds will provide the cleanest conditions. The most consistent spot is Batts Rock, a perfect A-frame peak that is  well-known among Bridgetown locals and like most west coast spots, 5 guys is a crowd. Powerful, hollow fast lefts are common.","id":1181},"elly bay west":{"description":"Classic beachbreak, rights and lefts. Works best from low to mid tide, light onshore winds on mid sized Westerly or North Westerly swell. ","id":1182},"sydney (maroubra)":{"description":"Sydney\\'s eastern suburban beach with probably the most consistent waves.","id":1183},"diamond head":{"description":"Beachbreak, SE to NE swell","id":1184},"la setenta (playa 70)":{"description":"Starting on the beaches around Havana, La Setenta is the pick of the spots. It's located to the west of the old centre, just in front of the distinctive Russian Embassy in the Miramar district. A shallow table of flat, dead but painfully sharp coral produces messy peaks that often close out. In fact, were it not for the slab of concrete sticking out into the ocean here that provides a marginally easier entry and exit point, this spot hardly differs from any other part of the reef that lines the Havana coastline. It can get very busy and, unfortunately, surf etiquette doesn't appear to have caught on in a big way in Cuba. ","id":1185},"coalcliff reef":{"description":"Extremely good sucky right hander, works in pretty much any swell easterly, but best in straight easterly, works best at low tide and can hold a decent size. ","id":1186},"maderia beach ":{"description":"Beachbreak, best in a south swell at low tide.","id":1187},"currumbin point":{"description":"The next classic, righthander is The Alley at Currumbin, which has very long rights, well sheltered from the strongest SE winds. Rarely a barrel, it lazily peels for hundreds of metres, just asking to be ripped to pieces. It is such an accommodating wave that all types of surfcraft tackle it making the crowds of longboards, SUP and even kiteboarders a bit daunting. Best with a SE swell up to double-overhead, SW wind and lower, outgoing tides to hold up the walls across the rivermouth. The main drag is the rip which runs northwards and makes the paddle-out difficult in moderate swells, sop most do a lap of the beach and jump of the rocks in front of Elephant Rock when small or head to the beachbreak just south and get swept around when big. This beach and north of the Alley through Palm Beach hold plenty of less-crowded peaks when the crowds get too much.","id":1188},"el cayo":{"description":"Good Spot in Havana behind Isla de Coco Park","id":1189},"umina beach":{"description":"Umina Beach is a classic beachbreak, located on the eastern edge of Brisbane Water National Park. Umina Beach offers great rights and lefts, with the best conditions being a South-South East swell, North East winds, and most tides. As it is a protected bay it can be inconsistent, but when it does fire its definitely worth being out there. ","id":1190},"st brelades - jersey":{"description":"Average beachie, offshore in N winds, only breaks on pushing tide, crowded if it works. ","id":1191},"plemont bay - jersey":{"description":"Fast, hollow beachbreak and reef potential. Works in similar conditions to Greve, i.e. rarely. Needs a SE offshore, busy if on. ","id":1192},"greve de lecq - jersey":{"description":"Fast, hollow beachbreak, only works in huge wrapping winter swells. Packed with locals when on. ","id":1193},"macuro":{"description":"Best beach break in Puerto Cabello","id":1194},"southwold":{"description":"Needs a heavy dose of swell to show a wave.","id":1195},"todos santos (mainland)":{"description":"On the Tropic of Cancer the small village of Todos Santos (not the famous island break) has miles of average beachbreaks plus a few miles north near the windmills is the swell and crowd magnet spot of La Pastora, which handles all size swells from both NW and S. Punta de Lobos will have an easy left in S swells and there are scattered reefbreaks and a left point around Palm Beach and San Pedrito. ","id":1201},"dungeons":{"description":"One of the most challenging big waves in the world with double-up drops followed by long speed walls that can close-out. Spooky, sharky outside reef. ","id":1203},"rocky point (margarita)":{"description":"A left","id":1204},"guacuco":{"description":"Down south, Guacuco offers small, empty peaks at this 5km (3mi) long beach.","id":1205},"taguantar ":{"description":"Beachbreak","id":1206},"las salinas ":{"description":"Beachbreak","id":1207},"punta ballena ":{"description":"Needs a large swell ","id":1208},"punta arena ":{"description":"Beachbreak","id":1209},"el bajo (malecon)":{"description":"Bodyboard spot in Havana","id":1210},"navegantes":{"description":"Classic right and left beachbreak. There are 3 spots: left called Gravatá, mid called Central and the right side, Canto. Good barrels and breaks on all tides.","id":1211},"indian rocks ":{"description":"Beachbreak which works best on north swells. Unless they are big, south swells don't break well.","id":1212},"el palito":{"description":"Best on an easterly swell ","id":1213},"redington rocks":{"description":"Beachbreak best on north swells","id":1214},"sunset beach":{"description":null,"id":4252},"st pete beach":{"description":"Beachbreak which works best with swells out of the south.","id":1216},"rio chico":{"description":"If you get bored of Montañita’s rights, then just to the N, inside Manabi Province is Rio Chico where long, consistent, uncrowded lefts wrap into the rivermouth, the wave breaks in the property of a hotel, for which you must pay a fee to enter. ","id":1217},"yzerfontein":{"description":"West Coast South Africa, 85 km from Cape Town, lots of surfers during holidays, becoming more popular every year.","id":1218},"playa de orzola":{"description":"Large beachbreak with good right hand pointbreak. ","id":1219},"elbow (sheboygan)":{"description":"Elbow is a soft, but long right, peeling off the breakwater","id":1220},"pass-a-grille jetty":{"description":"Left and right break","id":1221},"playa los cuatro":{"description":"Beachbreak and reef","id":1223},"la boca con con":{"description":"Popular spot near to Viña del Mar, regular lefts, good for beginners and mid-level surfers","id":1224},"horizonte del sol":{"description":"Beachbreak","id":1225},"paignton":{"description":"Beachbreak which rarely gets surf during the summer season and works on all easterly swells.","id":1226},"garretstown":{"description":"Best at low. Dangerous at high, iron remains of groynes in middle. Bad rip at west end. Rumoured reef at west end when big and clean. ","id":1227},"esmoriz":{"description":"Beachbreak for all levels","id":1228},"hourtin":{"description":"More open beachbreak that can line-up nicely on it’s day. The alios soft reef helps to shape bowly waves, but high tide will kill it in small swells. ","id":1229},"canto do recreio":{"description":null,"id":1230},"clogherhead":{"description":"Beach and reef setups that work on all easterly swells.","id":1231},"viejo y el mar":{"description":"Good spot behind Marina Hemingauy","id":1232},"challaborough":{"description":"Low tide right point and popular beachbreak. ","id":1233},"wembury":{"description":"Long, walling left breaking off Blackstone Rocks. Needs a solid swell to work but will work through the tide. ","id":1234},"santa marina":{"description":"World-class righthand reefbreak, breaking off the island of Santa Marina.  Freight-train walls and barrel sections.  Works from about 5 foot upwards.  Best on the rare combination of a large swell and a E or NE wind, usually only a few times a year. OK on all tides but dangerous rocks in front of take-off at low tide.  ","id":1235},"mandiri":{"description":"A very consistent beachbreak. ","id":1238},"xivares":{"description":"Right hand pointbreak. Breaks best from mid to high tide on a med to big NW swell. ","id":1239},"tobay beach":{"description":"Peaky beachbreak, town of oyster bay beach and just east of jones beach state park.","id":1240},"assinie":{"description":"Going from E to W, the first spot is Assinie, close to the Ghanaian border. It’s the most popular surf destination in the country with easy beach break conditions and a French run surf camp. The wave at Assinie breaks fast and hollow, and always picks up any available swell, until it closes out over 5ft (1.5m). Winter conditions are usually 1-2ft (0.5m) and clean, which makes it an ideal place to learn to surf. Assinie beach break peels off quickly and needs the regular offshores to stop it being a straight-hander. When the swell gets over 4-6ft (1-2m), and Assinie is maxed out, then it’s necessary to head west, towards the point breaks. From Assinie westward to Mafia, there’s a 20km (12.5mi) stretch of empty beach breaks. ","id":1241},"conil":{"description":"Beachbreak","id":1242},"walton rocks":{"description":"Beachbreak","id":1243},"hookipa":{"description":"This area is home to some of the best wavesailing in the world, so expect strong cross-shore trade winds on most days after 11am. Hookipa is the centre of kite/windsurfing activity in Hawai'i, but on windless mornings, this clutch of quality reefbreaks is always rammed. Furthest west is Lanes lefts, then there's shallow rights and lefts at the Point, just next to the main peak of Middles. The sailors are usually forced downwind on the rights, leaving plenty of long, roping lefts for packs of surfers to fight over. Hookipa is super-consistent, year-round, evidenced by the constantly jammed car parks of the Hookipa Beach Park off the Hana Hwy. ","id":1244},"champerico":{"description":"Despite being an unattractive coastal city, Champerico should not be overlooked by surfers. On a clean SW swell, the pier may go off with overhead, barrelling waves. Several cheap hotels make it possible to wait for those occasional days. ","id":1245},"hapuna pt":{"description":"Most beaches are steep, narrow and strewn with grey to black sand, so Hapuna, the island’s largest and whitest makes a nice contrast. Ideal for bodysurf or bodyboarding in the hollow dumpers plus a nearby reef peak that is a heavy, localised spot with square barrels in a W swell.","id":1246},"kahaluu":{"description":"Good quality lefts and rights.","id":1247},"avoca beach":{"description":"Avoca Beach is one of the most consistent spots on the central coast and is a hotbed of talent, both young and old. The beachbreak offers excellent peaks in many swell directions and the south end is well protected from southerlies. The line-up is competitive but usually free of aggro, although this doesn’t apply at the main attraction – The Point. This hollow, crowded right pumps on an E to SE and requires experience, since it breaks very close to the rocks all the way along. Good conveyor rip in the corner.","id":1248},"guaratuba":{"description":null,"id":3862},"punta abreojos":{"description":"One of several right hand pointbreaks along a mile or so stretch of coast. ","id":1250},"skunk point":{"description":"Epic right hand sand bar, boat access only. needs a south swell and gets board snapplingly epic. Long tubes, can be epic and empty due to boat access. ","id":1251},"haskels beach":{"description":"Can be really fun, gets peaky and racy but also get walled. I think wind swell is best for this place, gets maxed out quick with to much swell, better on smaller swells, always worth a look.","id":1252},"porthleven":{"description":"Fast, hollow, crowded reef peak to the west of the harbour. A short right barrel that gets very shallow on the inside and good lefts on certain swell directions. Cornwall’s best reefbreak is always busy when on with a large local crew, pros and media. Dangerous at high and low tide – experts only. Also another hollow right reef in front of the pier popular with lids.","id":1253},"greens beach":{"description":"Main surfing beach in Marrawah, Tasmania, Australia. Nice beachbreak with rights and lefts. Move into the lee at the south end for shelter from SW winds.   ","id":1254},"odeceixe":{"description":"A very mediocre but consistent and empty beach break can be found in this popular hippy town. ","id":1255},"falesia-vilamoura":{"description":"Predominantly left wedge","id":1256},"praia grande sintra":{"description":"One of the most consistent breaks in the Lisbon zone. This is a very versatile beachbreak with long, but often slow waves at low tide and faster, shorter shorebreaks when the tide starts pushing up. The rocks at the beaches northern end shelter a few rarely ridden rights. Doesn’t like a lot of wind and is busy whenever it’s on. ","id":1257},"cazon (buchuaco)":{"description":"Beachbreak","id":1258},"panama city beach":{"description":"Beachbreak","id":1259},"hull bay":{"description":"Left and right coral reef","id":1260},"umdloti ":{"description":"Beach with nearby reefs","id":1261},"copec ":{"description":"Beachbreak","id":1262},"la sabana":{"description":"Classic right hand pointbreak. Breaks best from low to mid tide on a big swell.","id":1263},"jetty park":{"description":"On rare occasions, waves can be surfed inside the channel entrance, but more likely, the south side of the jetty will break in big S or SE windchop. Lefts and rights on all tides. North of here the Coastguard will prevent people poaching the obviously good waves peaking along the coast of the Kennedy Space Center on Cape Canaveral. ","id":1264},"sunabe ii":{"description":"Long lefts, can get crowded. ","id":1265},"tidemills":{"description":"Works best two hours before or the two hours after low tide.","id":1266},"thirteenth beach ":{"description":"Considering 13th Beach stretches for over 6kms and faces into the SW swell stream, it's little wonder that city surfers will take the detour to see what's on offer. Furthest west is Turd Rock, a righthand point close to the sewage pumping station that most people think is shit. Next is Beacons which holds proper A-frames that hiss over the sandbars when it's on during a SW swell N wind day. The peaks then stretch all the way up to Barwon Heads where The Hole is a rocky set of reefs which get hollow on NE winds with an incoming tide. ","id":1267},"salinas grandes":{"description":"Beachbreak","id":1268},"fitzroy beach ":{"description":null,"id":1269},"essaouira":{"description":"A hippie’s shelter in the 60’s turned into a windsurfing Mecca thanks to the strong NE winds blowing here and in Moulay Bouzerktoun. A couple of surf breaks when the wind drops.","id":1270},"imbituba":{"description":"Beach break and home to the Brazilian leg of the world tour ","id":1271},"sanur":{"description":"East coast super-right that guillotines mercilessly over a sharp slab of coral and pinwheels at mach one for hundreds of meters, before closing out on the inside dry reef. Unfortunately, Sanur Reef needs a serious swell to even begin breaking and wont get classic until it is well overhead, meaning Nusa Dua will be twice as big. These huge swell conditions are rarer in the rainy season window when it’s offshore all day, so consistency drops further. On smaller days at lower tides, it breaks up into funnelling walls and long shut-down sections, but with more swell and tide, barrel predictability and length of ride improves dramatically. The inside section is often unmakeable on all but the biggest tides and days of the year and even then it will claim many victims. To say it is crowded is an understatement and some localism is likely.","id":1272},"itacoatiara":{"description":"Take the 14km (9mi) Niteroi bridge to cross the Bahia de Guanabara and reach Itacoatiara (Costão) where local hot surfers are all over the amazingly reliable beachbreaks including Meio and Pampo. ","id":1273},"windmills":{"description":"The peak at Windmills works on small swells and has tubey sections in an offshore E. There are lots of sandy reef peaks along this stretch including a regular left up at the Other Side of the Moon near the Lighthouse off Cape Naturaliste Rd, but it wont handle moderate swells, so is more of a summer spot.","id":2881},"el tránsito":{"description":"El Tránsito is one of the remote, central coast fishing villages where half decent waves can go unridden for weeks. Try the long, easy, left pointbreak, or the hollower right on the other side of town. ","id":1275},"playa conchalio":{"description":"Beginners may want to try the small swell beachbreaks at Playa Conchalio, even though it’s a fast and barrelling wave, best in the dry season. Check the ultra fickle right at the west end known as San Blas which needs W swell to line up at all.","id":1276},"arpoador":{"description":"Arpoador is Brazil’s surfing birthplace and usually entertains the best surf of the Zona Sul (South Side), easily recognised by its giant rock lookout. On medium to big E swell, lefts can reach 10ft (3m) and the best way to avoid thick crowds is to come surfing at night since the beach is lit. When the proper SW wind blows, though, there's good surfing all the way from Ipanema to Leblon where the seaside strip is even more densely populated. ","id":1277},"el bolsillo (pradomar)":{"description":"Pradomar is well-known for its soft rights off the jetty and lefts further down the beach, but the more consistent option is the slow, fat rights of El Bolsillo the next jetty north. It picks up all the NE swell, but maxes out in overhead conditions and the rips get really strong. ","id":1278},"praia da pipa":{"description":"Covering all the surrounding spots. ","id":1279},"quequen":{"description":"Beachbreak","id":1280},"sea isle city ":{"description":"Very consistent as the inlet channel will attract swell. Sometimes crowded with hippies and beginners. No pollution problems.","id":1281},"rayong mae ramphung":{"description":"Beachbreak ","id":1282},"banna beach ":{"description":"Typical beachbreak","id":1283},"kleinmond":{"description":"Beachbreak ","id":1284},"pinamar":{"description":"Beachbreak","id":1285},"llangrannog":{"description":"Beachbreak","id":1286},"serena":{"description":"Beachbreak","id":1287},"praia da barra":{"description":"Well known, quality Beira Littoral set-up with long breakwater. Requires a bit more swell than nearby spots but it also organises the waves and shapes some great sandbars. Best of all it is still slightly offshore on a north wind. ","id":1288},"tifnit":{"description":"Covers all the surrounding breaks ","id":1289},"turtles":{"description":"The Banyak Islands’ spots are usually shallow and fast, especially when it is smaller and all are sensitive to swell direction, switching between carvable walls and gut wrenching barrels. Turtles on Pulau Bangkaru  has a fun, walling left and occasional slot at the picturesque southern end of the island. ","id":3323},"kugenuma kaigan ":{"description":"Popular beachbreak","id":1291},"yallingup":{"description":"Steep, hollow waves, brush a scattering of hungry rocks along this curve of classic WA sand. Names like Mousetrap and Rabbit Hill refer to reliable clusters of rock and sand, but the whole stretch can fire all the way down to the learner-friendly peaks and occasionally thumping shorey facing the car park. Works on all tides and swells, with W resulting in more peaky conditions and S running lefts up the beach. ","id":1292},"berawa beach":{"description":"It’s mainly slop and shoredump between Canggu and this spot, where some rocky reefs anchor the sand and shape up some nice rights and a few lefts at high tide. Good for improvers/intermediates and wont be as crowded as Canggu, but the road in is a long detour if coming from Kuta.","id":1293},"seminyak":{"description":"There’s plenty of access roads leading to dozens of shifting sand bars that might be perfect A-framed peaks or surly, thumping close-outs as the swell gets overhead. Exposed to plenty of swell, this stretch can be double the size of Kuta. Tides affect the quality and shape massively and often strong rips make it impossible to stay in position. Check Petitenget, Ku De Ta, and Double Six for the best banks.","id":1294},"saunton sands":{"description":"Huge beach with long, slow walls, great for beginners, longboarders and kiters. ","id":1322},"boscombe":{"description":"Similar set up to Bournemouth but the banks aren't as reliable. Englands first artificial reef should be open by autumn 2007. ","id":1323},"penhale (perran sands)":{"description":"Huge stretch of decent beachbreaks, best at higher tide. The peaks always seem better just up or down the beach a bit… To the north is Penhale Corner – a long, walling right peeling off Ligger Point at lower tides. Very open to swell and wind and it can be rippy. ","id":1324},"eastbourne":{"description":"Sheltered from the headland, this beach can refine out-of-control storm surf. It works best at mid-tide and when it’s big. Strong SE wind swells can offer relief from the summer heat but are often weak and fickle.","id":1325},"southbourne":{"description":"Short, sucky, shorebreaks with sandbars anchored by many groynes. Popular with bodyboarders. ","id":1329},"chapel porth":{"description":"Classy, fast, hollow beachbreak. ","id":1331},"portreath - beach":{"description":"Average beachbreak, with good shelter from SW winds that works through the tides. Can be a shoredump at high. ","id":1334},"st agnes":{"description":"Powerful, beachbreak peaks over a rocky beach. One of the few spots working in big SW swells and winds.","id":1335},"newquay - porth":{"description":"Confused, gutless beachbreak that’s rarely surfed, suitable for learners when small. ","id":1337},"whipsiderry":{"description":"Average beachbreak favouring lefts and protected from SW wind. Secluded beach, good to escape summer crowds. ","id":1338},"gwenvor":{"description":"Most exposed beach in Cornwall, no surf here means no surf anywhere. Beachbreak peaks and a fickle right point over sand/rock at the north end of the bay. ","id":1343},"hayling island":{"description":"Very sheltered, sand island that needs a mammoth SW swell coming up the channel for anything to happen. Long stretch of average beachbreaks and a right sand point into the Chichester harbour entrance. ","id":1344},"shoreham":{"description":"Windslop for the desperate is the norm at the ‘Hotpipe’. Sandbar anchored by power station outfall. ","id":1346},"brighton - marina":{"description":"Crowded, shallow chalk and flint reef sheltered from SW gales (the only time it works) by the marina pier. Busy, rippy and localised. ","id":1347},"westward ho!":{"description":"Slow, crumbly, beginner-friendly waves. ","id":1351},"woolacombe":{"description":"Mellow, open beachbreak peaks working through the tide. Popular with longboarders and beginners. Lined-up high tide right off the rocks and shapely low tide peaks in the small bay of Combesgate to the north. ","id":1352},"bude - summerleaze":{"description":"Hollow left off the Barrel at low tide, mid to high tide right breaks into the harbour. Beachbreak peaks as well. ","id":1355},"crackington haven":{"description":"Rocky beachbreak in a sheltered cove that filters the swell size and gives rare shelter from N winds. Lacks power and shape. Cambeak’s huge outside bombora is awesome to watch, but never surfed. ","id":1358},"newquay-  little fistral":{"description":"Little Fistral is a high-performance, fast, hollow beachbreak. ","id":1360},"newquay - fistral south ":{"description":"Lined up lefts over sand and occasional rock bottom. Good shelter from SW winds by the headland. Prefers higher tides, unlike North Fistral. Jump off rocks when big.","id":1361},"newquay - cribbar":{"description":"Famous, fickle, heavy, big-wave spot. Rarely works as it needs to be perfectly clean and double overhead before it will break clear of the rocks. Rights are safer but the lefts can be good. ","id":1362},"crantock":{"description":"Fast, hollow, right sandbar off rocks to the north. Rivermouth sandbar popular with longboarders and a rare left in south corner on massive swells, quality depends on how the river has affected the sandbars. ","id":1363},"redcar":{"description":"Range of rarely, surfed reefbreaks around Redcar. Two outer reefs, 'scars' as they are known locally, hold much potential. ","id":1365},"marske to tees":{"description":"Long stretch of average beachbreaks from Marske all the way up to the South Gare breakwater; broken at it's mid-point by Redcar Scars. ","id":1366},"whitley bay":{"description":"Average beachbreak surfed in stormy conditions as it's more sheltered than Longsands. ","id":1370},"bamburgh":{"description":"Expanse of northeast-facing strand that picks up all available swell onto some nice sandbars. ","id":1377},"isle of wight - freshwater":{"description":"Hollow, fast right point that occasionally comes to life in SW swells. Rocky, rippy and not for beginners. ","id":1379},"seaton to blyth":{"description":"Versatile stretch of beachbreak peaks from Blyth to Seaton Sluice can have good shape if the banks are right. ","id":1381},"littlehampton":{"description":"Fickle beachbreak east of Littlehampton harbour entrance. Lefts off the wooden groyne work best on higher tides and will be busy if on. ","id":1383},"treyarnon":{"description":"Beginner-friendly beachbreak and sand-covered reefs for advanced. ","id":1390},"holywell bay":{"description":"Rarely surfed beachbreak, can have good banks if river shapes them up. ","id":1393},"porthmeor":{"description":"Hollow, fast, N-facing beachbreak that works in bigger swells. Good peak at the Boiler and a right off the island. ","id":1394},"east runton":{"description":"Very average beachbreak, regarded as the county’s premier spot because chalk reefs add some definition to the sandbars. Picks up all swells but best on a N swell and S wind at higher tides.","id":1396},"mundesley":{"description":"Swell magnet sandbars in front of town held together by dozens of old wooden groynes. Hollow if the wind swings to the SW during a NE swell. Better at mid incoming.","id":1397},"bacton":{"description":"Similar set-up to Walcott with exposed stretch of NE-facing groynes picking up swells from 180º. A big N swell at mid to high should see some hollow lefts run down the beach with the strong lateral current. ","id":1398},"torbay":{"description":"Range of punchy beachbreaks and the odd reef working on short-lived E Channel swells. ","id":1400},"nigg bay":{"description":"Classy, fast, hollow boulder reefs each end of the bay and good beachbreak peaks in the middle. Needs a big swell to fire but can handle the most size on this stretch of coast. ","id":1402},"balmedie to newburgh":{"description":"Remote stretch of rarely surfed beachbreaks. Picks up the same swell as Aberdeen. ","id":1403},"boyndie bay":{"description":"Shifting beachbreak peaks in a bay just west of Banff. Reef potential at north end of beach. ","id":1404},"skara brae":{"description":"A short high-speed ferry trip from Gills Bay to Stromness on Mainland in the Orkney Islands will uncover some more great waves breaking over slabs of slate and sedimentary rock. Picks up W-N Atlantic swells plus NE-SE North Sea swells on the eastern islands although they remain unsurfed. Winds are strong and constant so getting the required E winds takes patience. Highlights include Skara Brae, a long consistent left point opposite Skail Bay an equally long perfect righthander over flat reef. Further north around Marwick are moody slab reefs that amplify the swell and a boulder right point. These are just the known, easy to get to spots and the potential is enormous.","id":1407},"port of ness":{"description":"Protected pocket of sand facing the mainland that bends N swells onto sandbars and a scattering of rocks. Banks are always moving although the southern end gets a right off the rocks. Quick check from Europie if wind is W. ","id":1411},"st combs to inverallochy":{"description":"A quiet area with a brace of reef and beachbreaks worth exploring.","id":1414},"saligo bay":{"description":"Heavy beachbreaks in a small bay, rights at north end, lefts at south end. ","id":1416},"laggan bay":{"description":"Long beach with various peaks. Good banks by rivermouth, at north and south end. ","id":1417},"ardnave bay":{"description":"Rare, sheltered, rivermouth sandbar wave needing a massive NW swell to wrap in. ","id":1418},"lossit bay":{"description":"Remote beachbreak, rippy and dangerous at size. ","id":1419},"dalbeg":{"description":"Dalbeg is protected by a long jutting headland to the north and is usually a bit smaller compared to Dalmore. Hollow, thumping waves over changeable sandbars, sculpted by strong rips. Best in peaky, summer swells – out of control at double overhead. ","id":1422},"cliff":{"description":"Fast, hollow beachbreak, good tubes at low tide and long rides at other stages. Handles the most size of any UK beachbreak. Consistent and regularly surfed. Seriously heavy, rippy and dangerous when big. ","id":1424},"graveyards":{"description":"Rocky strewn beachbreaks not suitable for beginners. ","id":1427},"caravans":{"description":"Fickle right at the rivermouth, with a shorter, hollower left. ","id":1428},"dunaverty":{"description":"Rare beachbreak requiring big NW swells or Irish Sea windswells to create some low tide close-outs that become makeable at mid. Often onshore. ","id":1429},"keiss":{"description":"Long, left reef point at north end of Sinclair’s Bay, needs a big swell to break. ","id":1433},"st andrews west":{"description":"Mellow, shifty, slow-breaking peaks, great for beginners. Occasionally lines up but only moderately consistent. ","id":1435},"kingsbarns":{"description":"Range of rarely surfed beach and reef options that work on big N/NE swells and SW winds. ","id":1436},"arbroath":{"description":"3km of very sheltered beachbreak south of town and the left point at north end has potential. Needs a large N/NE or a small SE swell. ","id":1437},"murkle point":{"description":"Heavy, swell-exposed, rarely surfed pointbreak breaking off a rocky outcrop known as The Spur. Some protection on the inside from SW to W gales. Watermen only. ","id":1439},"castlehill to murkle":{"description":"Rarely surfed stretch of heavy reefs for the experienced and inquisitive. Nothing Left, Silos and The Pole are three of the thick ledgey lefts on offer. ","id":1440},"dunnet bay":{"description":"Below average beachbreak, home to various beginner-friendly peaks in small swells. ","id":1442},"balephuil":{"description":"1.5-miles of S-facing beachbreaks with reef potential at west end. ","id":1443},"the maze":{"description":"Beachbreak and heavy slab reef, the long bay has been the site of British windsurf nationals. ","id":1444},"the hough":{"description":"NW-facing beachbreak with reef potential at the south end. ","id":1445},"cruden bay":{"description":"Good, low-tide, river-sculpted sandbar peak by the harbour at north end, best on E to S swells. Picks up plenty of swell, but is a shoredump at high. ","id":1448},"porthcawl - rest bay":{"description":"Well-formed beachbreak peaks at this consistent and busy spot. Not so good when onshore. ","id":1449},"hunts bay":{"description":"Rare, mainly righthand reef, needs solid swell to get going, but closes-out when big. Best at mid tide. Rocky in and out. ","id":1456},"aberdaron":{"description":"Fun beachbreak with defined banks anchored by boulder patches. Good right off the rocks at the N end. Best when it gets overhead. Cross offshore in NW, jellyfish and rips can be a hazard. ","id":1474},"abereiddy":{"description":"Uncrowded W facing beachbreak option in solid swells, shelter from S quadrant winds. Fantastic cliff jumping over the headland to the N in the Blue Lagoon. ","id":1477},"harlech to barmouth":{"description":"Long stretches of beginner-friendly beach.","id":1478},"mossies":{"description":"Mellow offshore reef peak, named for the farmer that first witnessed surfers there. Access from Garywilliam Point as it’s a long paddle from the beach. ","id":1480},"garywilliam point":{"description":"Exposed righthand reef that makes the most of small to medium swells. Fickle as it blows and maxes-out easily. In light winds it can be fast and hollow with a jacking take-off. Only recommended for experienced surfers as it’s a critical wave. ","id":1481},"inch strand":{"description":"Slow, beginner/longboarder-friendly waves, this stunning beach is a beautiful venue for a cruise on a log. ","id":1482},"rossbeigh":{"description":"A 6km spit of land on the south side of Dingle Bay, this area is the start of the incredibly scenic Ring of Kerry. Rossbeigh is home to fun beachbreaks and has a boulder, lefthand point at the north end that requires a long paddle. ","id":1483},"kilmurren":{"description":"Desperation wave when the south coast is out of control. Deep cliff lined bay can offer some SW wind protection for a central peak. A big drop and big current from the rivermouth. ","id":1488},"annestown bay":{"description":"Holds fun beachbreak peaks up to head high and an outside left on big SW swells. Very messy in onshore winds. ","id":1489},"the perfect wave":{"description":"One of the south coast’s finest reefbreaks. A short, sucky and hollow left that rarely gets the NE wind it needs to be offshore and large SW swell. ","id":1490},"rosapenna":{"description":"Long, west-facing beach that needs NW swell to get going. Can be hollow if the wind is offshore E. Strong north south drift. ","id":1491},"pollacheeny harbour":{"description":"A rarely seen righthand tube, with two sections, breaking over boulders at the mouth of the harbour. Long, fast, powerful and incredibly fickle. ","id":1492},"kilcummin harbour":{"description":"Powerful left point, hollow and heavy at size, breaks better the bigger it is. Can handle a W wind but best on SW. Popular when other spots are maxing, so gets crowded. ","id":1493},"lackan bay / kilcummin":{"description":"Empty peaks along a scenic beach, good shelter from W winds. ","id":1494},"lahinch - shit creek":{"description":"Heavy reef, mainly a left at low tide but there are some rights at higher tides. ","id":1495},"lahinch - cornish left":{"description":"Further south from the Left, Cornish is a similar set-up but is a faster, hollower and shallower wave. Not as crowded, paddle out between the Left and Cornish.","id":1496},"cregg / moy beach":{"description":"A sheltered option when the swell is big. Fun little waves at this rocky cove. There are more waves further round the bay. ","id":1497},"pollan bay":{"description":"Situated near Malin Head, Ireland’s most northerly point. Gentle beachbreak with several peaks, working in W-N swells on an incoming tide. Nearby Tullagh Bay offers strong wind and swell protection. Sometimes crowded with surfers from Derry - gets busy in summer.","id":1498},"dunmoran strand":{"description":"Uncrowded beach that’s a good option for beginners/intermediates when the swell is up. Sheltered from big swells and SW winds. ","id":1499},"easkey left":{"description":"Easkey is home to Ireland’s most famous waves. The left is a popular reefbreak, working on all tides and any swell. Handles plenty of size. ","id":1500},"easkey right":{"description":"Much hyped righthand reef that is consistent but rarely epic. Can be perfect, world-class tubes but normally a long, whackable wall. W swell and low tide is best. ","id":1501},"tramore - incredible wave":{"description":"Another rare south coast treat, the Incredible Wave breaks off the headland at the eastern end of Tramore strand. Needs a big midwinter swell. Can be hollow but like most south coast waves, is very fickle. ","id":1503},"mullaghmore strand":{"description":"In the lee of the headland lies an extremely sheltered beach. When the Head is 15ft the Strand will be 1.5ft. Perfect for longboarders and beginners. ","id":1504},"mullaghmore head":{"description":"Ireland’s premier big-wave spot. The Head is a savage, shallow, lefthand reefbreak only surfable on high tide. Handles any size swell, producing massive tubes, but needs to be well overhead to break clear of exposed rocks. Offshore in a SW so makes the most of big winter storms. Has been paddled but is becoming known as tow-in spot. ","id":1505},"le club ":{"description":"More good peaks and there's often a defined, bowly right off both the short and long jetty. When it works, good tubes are on offer, especially in the bodyboarder-friendly shorebreak at higher tides, when backwash can be a problem. Paddling channels can form beside the jetties, but beginners will struggle with the power once it hits headhigh. ","id":1506},"le vvf   ":{"description":"As the last jetty recedes, a Lande-esque feeling returns to this half-kilometre of sand as sucky peaks or long, lined-up walls hit a variety of banks from the popular short jetty peak to the left in front of the crumbling cliffs below the lighthouse. All tides, all swell sizes up to 3m and it is nicely protected from all S winds. ","id":1507},"marinella ":{"description":"Like all the Anglet beaches, Marinella can be magic one day and junky the next, depending on the sand distribution and wind. Peaks will flank the jetties and work right through the tide, offering some steep shoulders and the odd pit. Medium W-NW swell and any E wind will do. ","id":1508},"les corsaires  ":{"description":"Like in Madrague, the jetties help shape the banks and the southern end usually builds up a good sandbar peak with rips either side.  As the tide shifts, one peak will replace another and it will break right through high tide if the swell is above 1m. ","id":1509},"la madrague":{"description":"With sandbanks constantly shifting around a couple of jetties, it’s hard to forecast what this one will be like. Easily overpowered by moderate swell and big high tides kill it off, but can have some crisp, fast walls. ","id":1510},"erretegia":{"description":"With mellow waves breaking over a mix of sand and rocks, this remote beach has long been popular with surf schools in the area. Tucked beneath low cliffs, the beach all but disappears on big high tides so dropping tide is better. Scattered rocks to avoid, otherwise it is beginner friendly when it's small to medium swell. ","id":1511},"guethary (avalanche) ":{"description":"With the right board, skills and conditions, the outside lefts of Les Alcyons can be ridden up to 7m+. This is where a handful of experienced locals paddle into the biggest waves in the country and tow crews also frequent the line-up. Best on low tide, the long walls flex and flow with some high pockets and muscular shoulders. ","id":1512},"les alcyons":{"description":"On the west side of the picturesque Guéthary harbour, a short but powerful left reefbreak, jacks on take-off and barrels across a shallow shelf. A heavy liquid and local current dominates the experts-only line-up. Needs a large N swell and can handle a bit of S-SW wind. ","id":1513},"parlementia":{"description":"The Guéthary terrace gives the best view of this Sunset-like right with a shifting peak and short shoulder that holds up to 6m faces on a clean, NW swell. The outside bombora style reef is quite deep, so the peak draws up a lot of water and only invites those on large, long, voluminous boards to get in early. There is also an attractive left off the peak, which rumbles back across the inner reef, sometimes walling up steeply or else sectioning and closing out. On small to moderate days, faster rights break over this shallower reef shelf that entice the shortboarders, but eventually the sets off the west peak will punish with a circuit via the inside then the channel. Can be some fun, steeper, inside runners for the less gun happy and the wide playing field does give everybody a chance. Paddle out from the harbour to avoid the rock slalom at lower tides.","id":1515},"l'horizon":{"description":"One of a dozen named semi-secret spots on the peninsula that can have great banks on any given day. Better with peaky, summer, W windswells, on smaller, lower tides, so there should be no reason to surf a crowded peak. ","id":1517},"porsmilin ":{"description":"Tucked in at l’Anse de Bertheaume, this lefthand reefbreak and Trez-Hir‘s defined high tide peaks are both better sheltered from W winds than Petit Minou. Unfortunately both take-off zones are really narrow and always crowded when the bigger SW-W swells get in. Trégana’s  shorebreak is a bit roomier.","id":1518},"dalbosc ":{"description":"Pretty hardcore spot known for the tubular left and longer right it can produce although it’s often just a big close-out. Deolen is another low tide option nearby. ","id":1519},"le petit minou ":{"description":"A hollow beachbreak with more rocks on the southern part known as ‘Les Moules’. Fun, curvy walls and smackable lips appear on any S-NW swell with any N wind offshore. Low tide only spot just helps to concentrate the extreme weekend crowds, due to Brest’s proximity. ","id":1520},"anse de pen-hat":{"description":"A hollow beachbreak that receives less swell than La Palue, despite good westerly exposure. Peaks at both ends are shaped by strong rips and the waves will have some punch at the favoured tide of mid incoming. ","id":1521},"pors-ar-vag":{"description":"A good beachbreak for beginners isolated in Lestrevet. Le Ris is another sheltered spot, just as sloppy but protected from stormy SW winds by high cliffs.  ","id":1522},"cap de la chèvre":{"description":"Break out the guns and a long leg rope when a big W swell hits the headland. ","id":1523},"la palue ":{"description":"Wide open, west-facing beachbreak  that picks up all available swells. Usually messy and weaker at low tide before lining up on the push past mid. Long walls and the odd barrel section make it a fun intermediate spot. ","id":1524},"lespecier":{"description":"A small isolated resort with endless peaks in each direction. Unappealing in onshores and overhead conditions. ","id":1525},"le prevent":{"description":"Stuck between two groynes and the athletes physiotherapy centre is a tiny beach with hollow bowls on a strong swell. This is where most of the surfers in the area will end up in winter and fight for one of the steep, sucky, sand-churning slammers that might just hold up enough for a short, fast ride. There's often a left into the rips near the southern groyne and a stable right at the north end.","id":1527},"l'estacade":{"description":"Tucked along the port’s south jetty, this is the ultimate shelter with laughable size compared to exposed beaches. Handles some N wind. Sometimes full and bloated, occasionally sucky and closing-out, but never perfect. ","id":1528},"le penon":{"description":"Worthwhile sandbars can appear along this stretch that used to have a long metal pier that caught the sand. Open and shifty, it often holds some really good higher tide shore breaks that entertain the mix of locals and travellers avoiding the bigger name breaks to the south. Unmanageable rips and impossible paddle-outs at double overhead. More banks up towards Casernes.","id":1529},"gwendrez ":{"description":"This Plouhinec beach became famous after pics of bodyboarders charging heavy 10ft barrels appeared in the press, despite it being a close-out most of the time. The low to mid tide outer sandbars can hold some fine shapely peaks, with fast walled up sections and tube potential, plus there's a rare but feisty left off the rocks at the southern end. Currents and rips get mean with size so it's no place for average surfers when it is overhead.  ","id":1530},"hossegor (la sud)":{"description":"A sheltered spot for those not willing to tackle la Nord on big days. Favours lefts and gives beginner/improvers somewhere to surf away from the rippers. Easy and never too big, but turns into an unsurfable shorebreak on high tide.","id":1531},"les bourdaines":{"description":"Good banks regularly form either side of the access path at what is probably the most popular and consistent spot in Seignosse. Stable sandbanks have forged this reputation over the years and there always seems to be a left/right just south of the path and multiple peaks up towards Penon. Often has a very defined channel between peaks and rippy inside sections. Dead high tide will be a struggle when small and diagonal super rips can hold up the close-outs when the faces exceed 8ft. ","id":1532},"porzcarn":{"description":"Just next to La Torche there’s an under-rated beachbreak and a righthand reef at high tide. Gets, hollow and wedgey, attracting more bodyboarders and the southern corner works on SW winds. The curve of the beach means NE is also ok and it is best around mid tide. The offshore big-wave reefs of Les Etocs can provide perfect 3-6m waves  for daredevils only. Pors Carn is usually much quieter than La Torche, unless the swell is pumping, when more locals will be looking for the rare perfect days on the  reef or in the protected southern corner. ","id":1533},"lesconil     ":{"description":"This stretch of coast, including nearby Benodet and Beg Meil, requires a rare combination of S swell and N winds to provide anything else than windsurf conditions. When on, a reef close to the harbour offers hollow, powerful, low tide lefts and some lesser rights. ","id":1534},"carcans":{"description":"Always quieter than Lacanau, which doesn’t mean that the waves aren’t as good. Often more walled-up than hollow but still plenty of power. ","id":1535},"le porge":{"description":"Can be a pretty picture that greets you from the dunes if a morning offshore is ruffling some headhigh A-frames on the mid tide banks. Sucky and fast on the outside bank with a habit of closing-out at low.","id":1536},"la jenny":{"description":"Consistent and often hollow peaks in small W swells. ","id":1537},"le crohot des cavales":{"description":"Another large shadow zone west of the Hourtin lake accessible only by bicycle. May not be the hollowest and lined-up banks around but it is solo surfing Crohot de France is even more isolated to the north. ","id":1538},"erromardie":{"description":"This bay is full of rocks and patches of reef, filtering the swell and rarely producing good waves. Longer, lumbering lefts section across the central break in front of the lifeguard hut, usually looking best at mid on the push.  The rights to the NE are dangerously close to the rocks and throw up some challenging drops and tubes for experienced surfers at high tide only. ","id":1539},"bidart":{"description":"The central beach is often crowded with local surf club members and there are some gnarly rocks to contend with that are exposed at low tide. Closes-out in bigger swells but has occasional memorable days with both fast walls outside and fun shorebreak hooks on the inside. ","id":1540},"sainte-barbe":{"description":"A long right with a radical, sucky take-off wraps around the jetty on the north side of the bay. It then runs off through a series of wall to shoulder sections as it refracts around the reef for quite a distance to Inside Sainte-Barbe. Here the tide affects the ride heavily and some fat bouncy lefts start to appear before fading out. Much closer to shore is Les Flots Bleus, a mini wave well-suited to kids and beginners. It’s very rare for the fashionable beach of St Jean de Luz to be worth riding. More N in the swell penetrates better, any NE to S wind will do and a dropping tide keeps it interesting. ","id":1541},"ciboure socoa":{"description":"When it gets huge, several spots work inside the bay from the harbour mouth back round to the town beach. A soft peak breaks in the shadow of the Socoa Fort and is offshore in a westerly, as is the rare bodyboarding shoredump at La Bougie. In Ciboure, near the entrance of the river Nivelle is a hard to access, localised reef called Le Port that may work a handful of times a year. Breaks close to the rocks and water quality is dubious. Always a few waves, regardless of how strong the wind or swell gets, but remember a 5m swell may only reach 50cms on the west side, depending on swell direction. ","id":1542},"belharra perdun   ":{"description":"A 15m deep, seagrass covered shoal 2.5km offshore creates an A-frame peak on the two or three largest swells of the winter for the European tow-in crew. A small team made history on November 22nd, 2002 before a second session on March 10th, 2003 when Sebastian St Jean towed into a wave estimated at 66ft (20m) winning the XXL contest final. Only breaks on low tide unless it is psycho huge. ","id":1543},"st pabu ":{"description":"Strong NW swell will awaken St Pab’s hollow shorebreak, a bodyboarder’s delight. The far corners of the beach give some wind and swell shelter . Offshore rocks and oyster farms block the swell at low tide so spring highs are a plus.","id":1544},"penfoul ":{"description":"The offshore islands block some SW swell, but there can be some nice rights scooting across the bay from the rocks to the north. Conditions are usually lumpy and messy here in any W wind. ","id":1545},"la mauvaise grève":{"description":"In front of the camping in Moguériec, this inconsistent reef tucked in a bay offers more power than Dossen. ","id":1546},"siouville":{"description":"Vauville has 16km of empty beaches that work on any swell coming from the W. From La Crecque right in the northern corner, through Vauville town and the scattered blockhouses of Biville, down to the dunes of Siouville there are plenty of walled up waves and feathering lips in the morning offshores. The best bet along this stretch of coast is Siouville, where the locals compare it to Les Landes when it’s grinding. Can handle a bit of S wind.","id":1547},"dielette":{"description":"With a huge NW swell waves break inside the harbour wall, but the entrance extension has virtually killed this spot. A hollow shorebreak known as ‘Le Platé’ is on offer for bodyboarders, just north of the harbour. Further out from the shoredump barrels is a lefthand reef that goes Indonesian every once in a while. Very rare, fast walls and pockets cling to the rocky reef at lower tides, while mid is ideal for most Diélette breaks.","id":1548},"les boulassiers ":{"description":"Swells over 3m wrap around the island to produce this long and mellow lefthander, provided the tide is high enough. Also peaks up a bit wider from the point offering some rights. ","id":1549},"les huttes ":{"description":"Trois Pierres, aka Les Huttes, is a pounding shorebreak offering several tubey peaks close to shore on higher tides. Many will check it with E winds and a NW swell. ","id":1550},"st-trojan":{"description":"This large beach offers an ample choice of peaks, always very consistent and accessible, but any wind other than offshore will ruin the session. Tough paddle-out when it hits headhigh. ","id":1551},"st-denis ":{"description":"Another huge swell option, the port’s long left-hander disappeared for a while due to construction works, only to reappear next to the new jetty. ","id":1552},"la barre":{"description":"The famous wave of the ‘60s has disappeared with the Adour jetty constructions and extensions. Peaks still form between the jetties that filter the swell and somewhat block cross-shore winds. Conditions need to be moderate to heavy swell to start breaking with any power and any high tide will kill it or create a death shorepound. Ranges from fat slopey lefts and the odd right to seriously big tow-in walls on the outside. ","id":1553},"tarnos":{"description":"The Metro beachbreak is very similar to Labenne and Ondres, with weak low tide rides in small swell, before awakening in overhead to double-overhead W-NW swell and serving up chunky, powerful barrels. Still best at low to mid, when there will be more peaks to choose from. ","id":1554},"labenne-ocean":{"description":"With a moderate NW swell and offshores, heavy peaks, close to shore, provide tube time for the local crew and visitors. ","id":1555},"la côte sauvage":{"description":"15km of west-facing beachbreaks need an offshore wind to shape worthwhile rides. Can be hollow and heavy when it imitates Landes. More reliable in the north nearer Pointe Espagnole, otherwise try La Bouverie and the Coubre lighthouse to the S.","id":4404},"plage du loch ":{"description":"Together with Guidel’s main beach this is the most consistent and therefore the most surfed spot around. Not the hollowest spot, but nice slashable walls and a mix of sandbars that keeps the crowd happy from low to mid tide. Fort Bloqué is sloppier, but good for beginners and longboards while Les Moules or Maeva provide high tide reef action. ","id":1557},"le kérou":{"description":"The Laïta river marks the limit between Finistère and Morbihan. There are a few spots on the west side, including this rocky beachbreak in Clohars-Carnoët. Has the ability to get some fast sucky lefts that the local bodyboarders love and handles overhead swell. ","id":1558},"toulhars ":{"description":"Larmor Plage hosts this very sheltered spot that is at its best when everything else maxes out. NW wind is no problem and it can get hollow on the pushing tide.","id":1559},"gavres":{"description":"This L-shaped peninsula doesn’t pick-up much swell but benefits from different expositions to the wind. The Linès side is more consistent while Grande Plage is well sheltered from west winds. ","id":1560},"etel":{"description":"Often looks like a close-out, but with offshore winds some tubular sections are makeable. ","id":1561},"le pin sec":{"description":"Just north of Hourtin only one road bisects the 10km long Forêt du Flamand. Endless choice of peaks along this quiet stretch that never gets crowded and has a good campsite nearby. ","id":1562},"l'amelie":{"description":"Occasionally fast and hollow wave s form up by the blockhaus or the jetty.","id":1563},"le verdon":{"description":"The construction of Port-Medoc didn’t seem to mess with La Chambrette, the ultimate shelter when the Atlantic coast is onshore and out of control. Inside the Gironde rivermouth, it breaks hard and fast tubes on big high tides only. ","id":1564},"le gurp":{"description":"With a large swell and a bit of luck, long tubing lefts can be on offer. Check the banks at La Négade to the north, or at Dépée next to the Euronat nudist camp. ","id":1565},"montalivet":{"description":"Nice peaks visible from the central car park, but there’s more for those that look around. The surf club sometimes organise night surfing sessions. The south side is a naked tourists’ hub.","id":1566},"pontaillac ":{"description":"The tiny bay of Pontaillac offers shelter from large swells and strong winds, right within the city of Royan. Needs size and high tide to be any good.","id":1567},"sauveterre ":{"description":"In the heart of the Olonne Woods, this exposed beachbreak also has two good reefs with long rights. On a clean, moderate swell, choose between the easy Pic du Phoque that can handle size, and the hollower Pic du Large that requires a 10mn paddle. The beachbreak gets some good waves as well.","id":1568},"saint-nicolas":{"description":"In a big storm, see if you can find a few secret spots scattered on the way up to Les Sables. The long left-handers of Plage de la Mine, close to Park de la Grange, are one of them. Favors rising tide and NW swell.","id":1569},"les dunes ":{"description":"A mellow beachbreak that has good walls for longboarders around mid tide, but tends to close out when overhead.  ","id":1570},"la sauzaie ":{"description":"Short but exceptional, seaweed-covered reef offers superb tubular sections and overall brilliant waves.  Always bigger and more powerful than surrounding beaches thanks to the shape of the reef. Lots of little slots on the rights and lefts but it can also handle some size when rumbling walls offer an open canvas. Shifts around a bit and keeps everyone guessing with lots of backdooring the peak. Handles a bit of onshore wind and can get close to the rocks and cliff at high tide on a smaller day.","id":1571},"saint gilles croix de vie":{"description":"City spot with a concrete promenade that ensures a good number of onlookers, but also a nasty backwash at high tide. Usually mushy but rarely closes out close to the jetty when it’s big and windy. In summer walk south to find empty peaks.","id":1572},"les conches/bud bud":{"description":"The breaks of Longeville offer hollow, powerful waves quite similar to those found in Landes and likewise depend on sandbanks formation. Most people surf Les Conches because it is closest to the parking lot, and can be an easier ride with more wall than tube. Walk south towards Bud-Bud for more power and increasingly hollow  peaks that get meaner with size on the shallower sandbars. Handles overhead plus and the higher tide walls walls can taper off through channels giving good length of ride. Even further south is  La Terrière, where the smart surfers go to avoid the regular crowds that blow out in summer.","id":1573},"porz théolen":{"description":"The north coast of Cap Sizun conceals many little-known reefs and beaches. Check the sunken boat of Porz Théolen, Pors Péron or Pointe du Millier, before searching the bays for more secret spots.","id":1574},"saint tugen":{"description":"The best beachbreak around in overhead conditions, delivering stand-up barrels at low tide. Faces straight into the SW swells, so any N wind will do and handles more size from more directions than most spots. At high tide, there can be a thumping bodyboarding shorey, but the rocks become a problem. ","id":1575},"pointe de lervily":{"description":"Two rights break over shallow reef; one close to the Island of Cows and another in the bay. Needs W or SW swell at decent size to break at Ile Aux Vaches and it will handle some size. Not really a barrel but fast and ledgey, requiring speed and skill to negotiate.","id":1576},"la gamelle  ":{"description":"This reef surprised many boats before being identified by a metallic beacon. When it’s huge everywhere else a wave breaks on each side, the right being shorter and hollower. There’s also a bodyboard shorebreak at high tide. ","id":1577},"les longchamps":{"description":"A friendly surfers’ hub, the beach is wide and good banks can provide hollow waves  or the more common onshore mushburgers. Favours rights and a spring incoming tide will jack up the wave heights. For a change check the capricious Garde-Guerin reefs, which will have some push over the scattered rock sections on a moderate W swell and any S wind will be offshore. Out on the western headland, the awesome but treacherous Dame Jouanne ledge sucks and slams the rock shelf at low, challenging the most competent surfers and tight local crew.","id":1578},"cap fréhel":{"description":"Driving up from Sables d’Or towards Cap Fréhel’s multi coloured cliffs will reveal several surf options. La Fosse at Pléhérel beach is quite consistent, but La Grève d'En Bas is much better as long as it’s not low tide. Good with S winds but SW makes it messy. Nice peaks and bowls when a decent W swell hits, which brings out a frothing crowd that have been waiting through the flat spells. ","id":1579},"sainte adresse":{"description":"Just below the Cap de la Hève cliffs, the stretch of Sainte-Adresse beachbreak is the closest spot for Le Havre surfers. Mostly lefts, it needs a decent W or NW swell wrap round the Contentin peninsula. ","id":1580},"hendaye plage":{"description":"This is the answer when everything else is closing-out. A long stretch of average beachbreaks offers a wide choice of peaks; usually better close to the casino or the south jetty. The place is perfect for beginners, which explains the amazing number of surf schools. The two rocks of Les Deux Jumeaux to the northeast occasionally hold a solid right that requires patience. Further out off the eastern headland is Vanthrax, an imaginatively named death peak that spews out massive left barrels a handful of times a year. Crazy bodyboarders and pros only. ","id":1581},"la pointe":{"description":"Very large swells can wrap around Cap Ferret and break inside the Bassin d’Arcachon, throwing up tubey little rights. W winds are offshore, but the hellish currents can make for bumpy rides, so it is popular with bodyboarders. ","id":1582},"le truc vert":{"description":"Probably the best known spot on the Cap-Ferret peninsula because of the large camping bearing the same name and the usual good shape of the jetty influenced sandbanks. ","id":1583},"le grand crohot":{"description":"Lande-esque line-ups with plenty of bains and good shape in peaky summer swells. Can be nice on the outside bars before it closes out at 2m+. ","id":1584},"le gouerou  ":{"description":"A hollow, powerful wave breaking close to shore. Nicely defined peak and bowly shoulders attract boards and boogers. Tricky exit on the high end of the tide so mid is best. ","id":1585},"kerloch":{"description":"Large winter swells light up this mellow beachbreak, which remains surfable with W winds if you stick in the north corner. Long rides with cutback walls and a high tide backwash. Further round the long scalloped beach is Kersiguennou, a good summer spot for beginners in front of the cliffs, while the south end is  Goulien where it will be bigger in W-NW swells. ","id":1586},"pointe de dinan ":{"description":"A scenic spot with a performance right breaking over uneven reef. Protected from N winds, it holds some size and rides can be 200m long. Boils and dry rocks at low tide and slalom skills needed when small. There are some lefts in the bay that break hollow on the pushing tide over a sand/rock mix. ","id":1587},"vaucottes":{"description":"Hidden between the legendary cliffs of Normandy, a small shingle beach that ends up with a stretch of rocks. This set-up delivers rather mushy waves, making it a beginner’s favourite, but it will hold large swells with a defined left sweeping in from the SW.","id":1588},"yport":{"description":"One of the best spots in Normandy: a nice, long left that wraps around a rocky bottom. A small cliff called Pointe de Chicard keeps the line-up glassy when the SW winds blow. On big days, a smaller right starts rolling on inside the bay. ","id":1589},"petites dalles":{"description":"Like nearby Fécamp, Petites Dalles is mostly a windsurfing spot. This shingle beach can still produce decent reef-like shape at mid tides. Best on big SW but also on NE swells accompanied by onshores.  ","id":1590},"boutrouilles":{"description":"Some good higher tide beachbreaks, thanks to patches of reef holding the sand. Popular with bodyboarders as there are good wedges among the granite rocks. ","id":1591},"collignon":{"description":"The left breaking along the concrete jetty can be one of the finest waves around. Unfortunately it’s super fickle and needs a big SW-NW swell and SW winds. ","id":1592},"l'anse du brick":{"description":"During strong SW wind and swell combos,  a 12km drive east from Cherbourg will be rewarded. Peak in the middle of the bay can wall up nicely.","id":1593},"hatainville ":{"description":"A wide zone of beachbreaks surrounded by pristine sand dunes from rocky Le Poux at the north end past the sandy point of Haitanville and down to the lighthouse of Carteret. Can get way overhead but currents are usually quite strong. Beginners can cross Carteret to check mellow peaks from the boardwalk of Barneville. ","id":1594},"camperduin":{"description":"One of the most powerful jetty breaks in Holland, known to even snap the odd board. Breaks outside at low and covers the jetty at high so mid tide on the push is when the barrels happen for a couple of hours. Waves can even run from one jetty to the next in a good NW swell.","id":1825},"kijkduin":{"description":"Good low tide option to Sheveningen that picks up all swells and gets hollow rights and lefts between short jettys in light winds. ","id":1828},"hoek van holland":{"description":"On the north side of the entrance to the immense Europoort is a decent beachbreak on NW swells, but the long jetty blocks anything from the SW. Rounder and more power than the average Dutch beachbreak, it's best around high tide with S winds. ","id":1829},"blokken":{"description":"With the construction of Maasvlakte 2 (expanding the port of Rotterdam with 2,000 hectares) most of the current surf spots are vanished under the Maasvlakte 2. The Blokken no longer exists.","id":1830},"schouwen duiveland":{"description":"Below average beachbreaks on the island of Schouwen Duiveland. Despite a NW aspect, it is often smaller than Domburg due to offshore sandbanks blocking the swell, so high tides are best.","id":1831},"vlissingen":{"description":"Long righthanders, perfect for longboarders sweep in with really big NW or N swells, accompanied by strong N winds which are offshore. Only works a couple of times a year and only around the high tide. ","id":1832},"bredene":{"description":"Just east of Oostende in Bredene there are average waves in front of Beachclub Twins (strandpost 1). ","id":1833},"mariakerke":{"description":"A popular spot in this small beachtown is baptised ‘Ollie’s Point’ named after the founder who discovered this ‘secret spot’ during the '90s. Standard beachbreaks between rock jetties that occasionally turn on after a big N storm and the wind calms down. ","id":1834},"oostduinkerke":{"description":"South of the long jetty at Nieuwpoort, which provides good NE wind protection, the jetties stop and open, disorganised beachbreaks stetch down to Dunkirke. The newly built beachhouse ‘Windekind’ is an excellent hang-out for local surfers and provides hot showers for members. ","id":1835},"bunkers":{"description":"Probably the best wave in Denmark, when a W swell meets the triangular reef and throws up hollow little rights and left shoulders. Problem is it must be no wind or E wind so it rarely works. Loads of messy, exposed beachbreak up and down the coast.","id":1836},"hanstholm":{"description":"Large port where Jutland meets the Skagerrak and the bend in the coast makes it surfable in howling SW winds. The break close to the port is called Fish Factory due to nasty smells from nearby industry and dubious water quality. Further east is a smaller jetty that grooms lefts in SW cross-offshore conditions. Bunkers has peaks in slack wind conditions.","id":1837},"el conquistador":{"description":"Consistent, fun, smaller swell peak in front of the Hotel Conquistador. The lefts are usually better, and the reef can work on S swells. ","id":1848},"derecha del cartel":{"description":"Excellent lined-up right with peeling bowl sections offering good tube time. Longer rides than Spanish Left and handles a bit more size. Best around mid tide on a NW swell. ","id":1849},"el confital - tenerife":{"description":"Fast, hollow challenging left on exposed south coast reef. Any kind of S swell N wind combo will work, providing it doesn't get too big. ","id":1850},"el callado":{"description":"Nice rolling peak over boulders that can wall-up for a long way. There are a lot of other spots nearby including El Roquete just over the channel and and a few bodyboard waves on the other side of the port.","id":1851},"fuera de la bajeta":{"description":"Reknowned outside reef of mossy rocks that produces an excellent long righthander that needs an overhead N-NE swell to really get going and wont stop till it is very big. La Bajeta itself is a high tide right breaking closer to the sharper rocks inside, in small summer NE swells and winds. ","id":1852},"el charco ":{"description":"El Charco is a long lined-up left  that breaks best on NW swells and any S wind. Powerful, tubular and challenging it needs to be headhigh swell to start linking together the many sections that break seperately in small swells. There’s also an outside peak called El Pozo for big wave chargers.","id":1853},"los patos":{"description":"Swell magnet beachbreak that is a good option in small peaky summer swells. Closes-out easily and suffers from strong rip currents. ","id":1854},"la caleta":{"description":"The main wave is a righthander that rumbles down the reef, offering powerful walls and snappy sections. There's a left further east and another one across the bay towards town. ","id":1855},"el paso":{"description":"Awesome big wave spot and proving ground for the gun brigade in Gran Canaria. Good for tow-in surfing when triple overhead plus. NW swell will see some fast, scary barrel sections on both sides of the peak and rides can be long.","id":1865},"molokai":{"description":"Good small swell spot on any pulses from the W all the round to E wind swells. Occasional good quality waves perfect for longboarders and beginners. ","id":1868},"quintanilla - gran canaria":{"description":"An underrated lefthander that can be seen while driving the main north coast highway. Steep, fast, performance walls that get better when bigger, but not recommended for weak paddlers. ","id":1869},"el comedor":{"description":"Another small swell spot with a wide swell window offering slopey walls and crumbly sections down a boulder reef. N swells should line up best but high tide kills it.","id":1870},"boquines":{"description":"Spring and summertime are best seasons for this excellent right pointbreak. Fun, playfull walls for all kinds of manouvers and good length of ride when the swell has some E in it. ","id":1871},"el lloret":{"description":"El Lloret is a good quality pointbreak with fast, punchy walls that peel down the boulders for up to 200m. Needs overhead NW swell to get going. There´s also a fine left pointbreak across the channel. ","id":1873},"la barra - las canteras":{"description":"Natural reef that protects Las Canteras Beach, but is only rideable on high tide. It's a decent paddle from the shore to reach the hollow peaks. The peak at La Puntilla to the north is closer to shore.","id":1874},"mosca point":{"description":"Excellent spot and Gran Canaria´s longest left. Only offers good conditions a few times a year when NE-E swells are groomed by W winds. Very long rides and also barrel sections. ","id":1875},"playa de las mujeres":{"description":"This secluded southern beachbreak is a favorite spot for air-loving bodyboarders. The massive backwash is a perfect launch ramp for inverted airs, 720´s and other radical manouvers. Mid tide and S swells only.","id":1876},"playa del ingles":{"description":"Summertime spot that only works with a big E windswell and when this happens it is always crowded. Usually onshore and junky in the NE winds, but a fun wave for all abilities.","id":1877},"tauro":{"description":"Short but intense ride that's simply a big barrel and then kick out before the reef goes dry. Only for bodyboarders at high tide and a helmet is a good idea.","id":1878},"el frontón":{"description":"Only a few rivals as the heaviest wave in the world. Totally slab. Only ridden by local bodyboarders who dont tolerate visitors. More perfect right but the left is sick also, depending on the swell direction. Square, mutant tubes that quickly shut down on the shelf.","id":1879},"bocabarranco - gran canaria":{"description":"Below average beachbreak peaks over rock and sand. Poor quality of wave compounded by volumes of raw sewage.","id":1882},"refsnes":{"description":"Shifting peaks, with similar waves to Bore.  Needs a proper sandbar to be any good so late summer is the best bet.  ","id":1883},"pigsty/piggy":{"description":"Aka Svinestien, it's one of the few spots in the Jaeren area which can be considered 'world class'. Winter training ground for locals preparing to travel to the more core areas of the surfing world. Fast, ruler edged rights with barrel sections and some less speedy lefts. Must be E winds and a lined up NW swell, big enough to keep the boulders submerged.","id":1884},"reve havn":{"description":"Top quality wave with lots of workable wall and hollow sections. Needs a medium to big NW swell and handles the predominant winter southerly winds. Closes out before double overhead, when a sketchy wave breaks just off the barnacle encrusted harbour wall - experts only.","id":1885},"bore":{"description":"Shifty peaks, giving short hollow rides in the chest to head high range.  Closes-out easily but banks are best early autumn after calm summers.  Picks up all available swells so Bore is the summer spot when the swell is too small for the boulder breaks.    ","id":1886},"byberg":{"description":"Northwest-facing boulder reef/point that attracts SW swell. Good, whackable walls going left, although it usually lacks power and is very sectioney. When the swell is big, a short, fun right appears to the south.  Enter the water at the boat ramp.  ","id":1888},"hellestø":{"description":"Works on W-NW swells and offers a bit of N wind protection. Classic days can hold up nicely and be more hollow than Bore, if the swell is lining up. Unfortunately this is rare and Bore is always bigger.","id":1889},"kvassheim":{"description":"Together with Piggy, Kvassheim is the jewel of the crown on Jæren.  Fast, punchy performance walls  especially on the favoured S swells. Once the swell goes north of W the Rio Grande current hits in, the paddling gets unbearable for most surfers and the shoulder also fades.  100 m + rides at its best so most surfers walk back up the point to save some paddling power. ","id":1892},"ervik":{"description":"Can be a quality beachbreak when the sand lines up and more consistent than the Jæren area.  High performance low tide lips that fatten up through the tide.  Some wind shelter from the surrounding hills.  ","id":1893},"suppå":{"description":"Fun, easy left situated on the north side of the bay, so it is often slightly bigger than nearby spots.  A rare, powerful right appears in a decent period swell.  .","id":1894},"perelle bay - dom hue - guernsey":{"description":"The island’s premier big-wave spot is an exposed, fickle, deep-water reef that sits off Perelle Bay. Shifty, sketchy and only suitable for lovers of heavy water. A big drop into a bowly right with deep water at the end if you make it.","id":1897},"portinfer - guernsey":{"description":"Consistent beachbreak, picks up more swell than Vazon. Best at mid on the drop then closes-out towards low, but occasionally gets good and hollow. A tubular right reefbreak known as the 'Knife' is situated off the rocks at the north end of the bay, surfable only at high tide up to head height. ","id":1900},"l'ancresse bay - guernsey":{"description":"Fun, versatile, winter-only beachbreaks, quite sheltered so it needs to be solid. Still good when onshore. Best on the drop just after high tide. ","id":1901},"fort le marchant - guernsey":{"description":"Sheltered, inconsistent left point that only breaks in the biggest winter storms. Swells have to wrap in 90º to the point, which is offshore in SW winds. Sketchy vertical take-off in front of the rocks, a fast, hollow section then the wave fattens out into deeper water. A rare sight. Strong currents. ","id":1902},"secrets - jersey":{"description":"Fast, high performance, French-style beachbreak, mainly rights with lefts working when the swell gets solid. ","id":1903},"stinky bay - jersey":{"description":"Long, walling left pointbreak over uneven reef, at the north end of St Ouens Bay. ","id":1904},"les brayes - jersey":{"description":"Fun, long beachbreak walls on solid swells. ","id":1905},"la rocco - jersey":{"description":"Gnarly, heavy, epic big-wave righthander, breaking in front of exposed rocks, ridden by small hardcore local crew, handles the biggest swells the Atlantic can throw at it. For experienced surfers only. ","id":1906},"petite port - jersey":{"description":"Chunky, powerful big-wave reef, heavy right and longer softer left, ridden at high tide when small, low tide when big, handles huge swell but rarely epic. ","id":1907},"sumner bar (christchurch)":{"description":"If Sumner Bar is on, most waveriders check Taylor’s Mistake, which is a bit more exposed to an E-NE swell and gets some juicier lefts and rights near the beach headlands. Banks Peninsula’s unreal coastal features make it a tough place to travel, with hellish, windy gravel roads. ","id":1950},"smails beach":{"description":"Not far is Smails Beach, suited to small S swells with an established left in the east corner and lots of rips. ","id":1952},"sandfly bay":{"description":"Dunedin’s southern beaches shelter some of the best beachbreaks in the country. Flat days are rare but strong rips and heavy storms are a common occurence. Sandfly Bay requires a long hike over sandhills down to an average beachie, best on small swell at low tide. ","id":1953},"waiwakaiho":{"description":"On high tides and major swells the reefs and sandbars of the Waiwakaiho rivermouth can be excellent. ","id":1956},"back beach (taranaki)":{"description":"In winter (May to Oct) the best option is to be in the New Plymouth to Oakura area. There are many good reefs in New Plymouth but for a mellower surfing environment, it is recommended to drive down to Oakura. This is where most New Plymouth based surfers head for shelter when the strong SW winds blow, and the consistent waves of Back Beach regularly turn on the quality. ","id":1957},"sponge bay":{"description":"Sponge Bay despite its name, is not a bodyboarder heaven but a mediocre beach that wouldn’t be mentioned if it were not the access to Gisborne’s best wave: Tuamotu Island!","id":1958},"stock route":{"description":null,"id":1959},"oakura":{"description":"In winter (May to Oct) the best option is to be in the New Plymouth to Oakura area. There are many good reefs in New Plymouth but for a mellower surfing environment, it is recommended to drive down to Oakura. This is where most New Plymouth based surfers head for shelter when the strong SW winds blow, and the consistent waves of Back Beach regularly turn on the quality. In Oakura proper there is a high tide beach break, suitable for beginners and some reefs to the S that are worth investigating. ","id":2014},"ahu ahu":{"description":"Spots like Ahu Ahu hold good shaped peaks and are generally best at low tide. ","id":2015},"waitara bar":{"description":"If the wind is calm (unusual for this region) there is an awesome right-hander at the Waitara Bar rivermouth. ","id":2017},"punihos":{"description":"Close to Okato is Kumera Patch, a left point break that breaks a bit like Raglan. All around here are small tracks leading through farms to the ocean and waves. Always ask permission before crossing someone’s property and close all farm gates. ","id":2019},"komerne road":{"description":"Close to Okato is Kumera Patch, a left point break that breaks a bit like Raglan. All around here are small tracks leading through farms to the ocean and waves. Always ask permission before crossing someone’s property and close all farm gates. ","id":2020},"scott point ":{"description":" Scott Point is one of those swell magnets suited to adventurous and equipped surfers at the end of 90 Mile. It’s a fickle right point off a headland and there’s hardly ever anyone out. ","id":2021},"green meadows":{"description":"Finally, Green Meadows in Pihama is one of Taranaki’s gems, a point break that has long, excellent rights.","id":2024},"railways":{"description":"Further towards Blue Bay is Railways, another good righthand point that requires a massive swell from the S. ","id":2026},"opoutama":{"description":"Opoutama itself has a 6km (4mi) long, average beach break that rarely goes flat. ","id":2027},"black's beach":{"description":"This zone is packed full of decent spots with at least 4 reef breaks, 6 point breaks and a powerful beach break. The black sandy beach accounts for the name of the closest reef to Nuhaka. Black’s Beach is a good quality peak, with a nice barrel section. ","id":2028},"mahia reef":{"description":"Right by the cliffs, is Mahia Reef, which offers mellow lefts regardless of the tide, but again it only breaks on major swells. ","id":2029},"last chance":{"description":"If nowhere else in this area is working properly then there is a good chance of finding something worth while at the appropriately named Last Chance. It is best on a N-E swell and mid tide, but getting down to the waves can be tricky. ","id":2033},"":{"description":null,"id":2913},"la punta - playa zicatela":{"description":"Less assured surfers should head down to the mellower, but busy lefts of La Punta, which offer the relief of a paddling channel and some long, fast walls. It’s easier to take a bus rather than endure the long, hot walk. Late afternoons should see the wind drop away and Puerto Escondido should clean up.","id":2057},"ostiones":{"description":"Ostiones is accessible by sea or land (long walk) and the lefts are worth checking on a big swell. ","id":2058},"san pancho":{"description":"You’re not in California, but after Santa Cruz comes San Francisco, or San Pancho as the locals call it. Close to the huge Costa Azul resort, its a fast lefthander off the point and sucky peak in front of the river that can hold some size and gets hollow around low tide. ","id":2059},"escolleras":{"description":"Escolleras at Playa del Palmar benefits from currents running along the marina, which sometimes shape a tubular right, but you won’t be alone. ","id":2060},"stoner's point":{"description":"After passing the resort town of San Blas and its poor beachbreak, Stoner’s Point is the first classic pointbreak, memorably ridden on a perfect day by Jeff Hakman and Jock Sutherland in the film Cosmic Children. ","id":2062},"aticama":{"description":"The lefts of Aticama’s pointbreak are much more consistent and of excellent quality, but being so close to a fishery there’s plenty of sharks drawn to the area. ","id":2063},"santa cruz - nayarit":{"description":"Just as good in a pure S swell, but a little less sharky, despite its rivermouth, the Santa Cruz left pointbreak peels perfectly along a cliff, with rides over 200m. The point needs some swell, so check the rivermouth if it’s too small. ","id":2064},"troncones":{"description":"Just south of Manzanillo, Troncones is a 5km (3mi) long stretch of beach marked with rock outcrops that encourage sandbar peaks, but it’s the moody right reef at the south end that draws the crowds. ","id":2065},"san augustin":{"description":"San Augustin needs a big S swell to work since it faces SE and an offshore island bounces the swell round the rocky bay. Nothing specia,l but a beautiful spot. Bahias de Huatulco are well-protected tourist bays and offer little in the way of good waves, unless there is a really huge S swell.","id":2066},"el paraiso":{"description":" A much better bet is El Paraiso, where a bend in the beach arranges nice triangular bars and some fast, hollow, yet forgiving rides compared to it’s illustrious “on steroids” neighbour. ","id":2067},"cuyutlan":{"description":"Manzanillo Airport is the usual arrival point for surfer’s, but the waves in town and at nearby Cuyutlan are usually a huge close-out shorebreak, unless a small peaky S swell hits the straight banks. ","id":2068},"el faro (guerrero)":{"description":"The industrial city of Lázaro Cárdenas receives some thumping surf along a dozen jetties and El Faro is the most commonly surfed spot. ","id":2069},"colotepec":{"description":"To the E of Puerto are the reliable rivermouth sculpted beachbreaks of Colotepec, which can still pack some punch and dredge some sand. ","id":2070},"punta chivo":{"description":"Punta Chivo is easy to get to through a small fishing village then a walk out to the point. It’s a fun, mushy wave great for longboarders and beginners and home to Salina Cruz Surf Tours, the only surf camp around. NE-E blow’s it out but any W wind and S swell is fine. ","id":2071},"la ventosa":{"description":"Just E of Salina Cruz, La Ventosa is a highly consistent beachbreak, best with a small to medium summer S/SW swell and a low tide. There are miles of A-frame peaks to the east, but the offshore trade winds are sometimes too strong to surf here! ","id":2072},"barra de potosi":{"description":"Barra de Potosí is really sheltered from S swells but once or twice a year, a left peels down the point in huge swells. There’s also some peaks in the rivermouth and a right pointbreak, but neither is really breathtaking. ","id":2073},"hampton beach":{"description":"The north end of Hampton Beach offers some decent protection from a NE wind, and the whole stretch can have some nice peaks, particularly on a mid to high tide. The lefts that run down the southside of Great Boars Head are fast, hollow, and shallow with no room for error, so “experienced surfers only” applies.","id":2074},"linkys":{"description":"Either side of low tide and a huge swell might see this quality righthander get going. Doesn’t break until it’s head-high but will handle anything the Atlantic can serve up. NE to E swell will get in better, and SW wind is far preferable to NW, which will bump up the face. Easy paddle-out and take-off make the barrel sections easier to ride, but the rocks are always waiting to claim the unwary.","id":2075},"costellos":{"description":"A short wave with a steep take-off plus the odd dry rock popping up in the face. Looks like a potential goer but doesn’t really do it. High tide only. Plaice Cove to the south can get some very decent beachbreaks on occasion.","id":2077},"seabrook beach":{"description":"Beachbreak peaks that work on all swell directions. Handles up to double overhead, but you’ll have trouble getting out the back. Constantly changing sandbars can shape powerful hollow waves or slow mushy shoulders, plus the position of tide is crucial to this tricky spot.","id":2078},"cherry grove pier":{"description":"Beach break with peaks either side of the pier offering lefts and rights (depending on which side of the pier your on). Pier can offer some shelter from the wind.","id":2087},"devils rock":{"description":"Sand bottom beach break with peaky left and rights. Great for improver/beginners, closes out on big swells. To the left, around the headland, is Banana Point and for the experienced surfer a gem lies between the two spots. Can be crowded on the weekends with locals. Relaxed vibe and great cafe on the beach.","id":2088},"blinky beach":{"description":"Lord Howe Islands only beachbreak situated on the less reliable east coast.","id":2089},"harry's":{"description":"Heavy, hollow righthander over coral.","id":2090},"bagasbas beach":{"description":"Sparse open beach, rarely crowded despite being one of the most best surfing sites in the area.","id":2092},"bailey's beach":{"description":"All tides and any wind from NW to E for this hollower beachbreak. Mid tide on a SE swell can get good up to head-high. Usually only breaks on stormy easterlies.","id":2096},"lagundri bay - indicators":{"description":"Since the 2005 earthquake, all the waves in Lagundri Bay have been affected (uplift min 0.3m), including Indicators, a very shallow, hairy right with pinching barrels, where it’s critical to wait for the right wave and then kick out before the disastrous end section. Only attracts a handful of locals and hellmen, on the few days a season it works. ","id":2148},"the machine":{"description":"Losers in the new reef levels include Kiddieland, which has been replaced by a softer inside section of The Point and The Machine, an ultra hollow left barrel, deep in the bay, that now needs huge spring high tides and a macking swell. Has a new kink in it mid wave so making the channel is unlikely. There are also a variety of other lesser waves in the neighbourhood, within walking distance to the west (Sobatu) or back towards Teluk Dalam harbour (Rivermouth). ","id":2149},"27th ave/north myrtle":{"description":"Takes a bigger swell than the rest of the area. Hugo removed the pier, but a recent beach nourishment has resulted in a good low tide outside bar and a high tide shorebreak. Longer rides when it links up.  ","id":2152},"17th street boardwalk":{"description":"Since the construction of a new pier, the waves here have improved. This short top-to-bottom wave produces rights and lefts a couple of hours before and about an hour after high tide. Lower tides, forget it. ","id":2153},"north jetty":{"description":"The best wind for the next few breaks is onshore! Without it, there will be no waves. The banks at the North Jetty are a fair way down the beach. Same deal as Sugar Shack and 2nd Street. Crumbly, mushy, fat waves that might wall up on the inside. ","id":2155},"ditch plains":{"description":"This mushy left with its workable wall and longer rides is a favored longboard spot. Occasional steeper rights, plus a few faster lefts further to the east. Between here and the lighthouse, there are some more rocky reef spots, which require a long walk.","id":2159},"atlantic terrace":{"description":"No parking near the beach without a town permit, which costs $150 a year. Even so, the place is often crowded with locals and vacationers staying in the numerous beachfront hotels.","id":2160},"turtle cove":{"description":"This classic-looking righthand pointbreak can hold double-overhead powerful rights in a SE swell with W-NW winds. Very sectiony with multiple take-off points, short barrels occur along the boulder-strewn line-up. Incoming around mid tide should see the best waves with the least dry rocks popping up. There is also a short left directly beneath the threatened lighthouse (due to fall into the sea if the serious erosion continues).","id":2161},"jones beach state park":{"description":"From Fire Island Inlet to Jones Beach, 10 miles (16km) of unstabilized beach can produce some decent sandbars on the right day. High tide is no good because it amplifies the trough of deeper water between the outside and inside banks. The Gilgo area is generally the most consistent.","id":2162},"fae":{"description":"Salinas is a busy tourist peninsula that catches both N and S swells. Unfortunately most breaks are located in a military zone that requires a permit to enter - the Costa surf club may be able to help you get a ride in with someone who has a permit. FAE is a consistent spot left that needs perfect wind and swell direction to be classic, otherwise it’s just a fun, workable wave. Close by is Chocolatera, a good but fickle right. ","id":2180},"chocolatera":{"description":"Salinas is a busy tourist peninsula that catches both N and S swells. Unfortunately most breaks are located in a military zone that requires a permit to enter - the Costa surf club may be able to help you get a ride in with someone who has a permit. FAE is a consistent spot left that needs perfect wind and swell direction to be classic, otherwise it’s just a fun, workable wave. Close by is Chocolatera, a good but fickle right. ","id":2181},"punta chulluype":{"description":"Punta Chulluype is the main spot with good potential but don’t surf it at low tide as it’s too shallow. ","id":2182},"punta bellaca":{"description":"There’s no surf within Bahía de Caráquez’s peaceful eco-city but the fickle pointbreak of Punta Bellaca will fire occasionally. When on (with good SW-W swells), a bunch of locals will be there to enjoy powerful waves around the low tide. ","id":2183},"punta galera":{"description":"Punta Galera is like a slow copy of Suspiro and Mompiche. It’s usually worth checking in the mornings when a NW or strong W swell shows up. The tedious access keeps the crowd levels down. ","id":2184},"san mateo":{"description":"San Mateo is a dreary fishing village with a remote but classy left that breaks only around 10 times a season. It’s sharky and fairly well-known by waveriders from Manta. ","id":2185},"punta suspiro":{"description":" A few clicks south, Punta Suspiro is an underrated wave needing the same conditions, used as a crowd escape from Mompiche. It’s another left pointbreak with long, classy rides.","id":2186},"portete":{"description":"Portete is a powerful righthander just on the other side of Suspiro, it will break with any swell direction but doesn’t offer the same wind protection and therefore gets blown out very easily. This spot is quite dangerous at low tide. ","id":2187},"punta tonchigue":{"description":"Solitude-seekers may feel better in the fishing village of Tonchigue, but the local left pointbreak is usually quite sectiony. ","id":2188},"atacames":{"description":"Atacames is much more tourist orientated but some caution is still needed. Facing lively beach bars, the beachbreak ranks highly on the fun scale with barrels at low tide and long rides at high tide. It needs a NW or strong W swell to function. ","id":2189},"la mesita":{"description":" If the swell comes from the NW it’s best to go down to La Mesita, a remote left pointbreak offering long rides away from any crowd.","id":2190},"cabo pasado":{"description":"Cabo Pasado is a reefbreak only accessible by boat from Canoa, which explains why it’s only a recent discovery. With NW to W swells it can provide perfect, crystal water barrels. ","id":2191},"punta mala":{"description":"Punta Mala, N of Salango, can only be reached by boat. The left you’ll find there is worth the ride, as is the scenery. ","id":2192},"bocana del cojimies":{"description":"There’s no surf right in Cojimies, the first stop in Manabí Province, but with the help of a boat, hardcore explorers will reach the outer sand banks (a couple of km offshore) where a bunch of beachbreaks can prove worth the effort. ","id":2193},"engabao":{"description":"Engabao is by far the most consistent break on the S shore with punchy, performance orientated small waves. ","id":2194},"punta panico":{"description":"Just south of Cabo Blanco, cliffs curve out to another challenging left, suitably named Panic Point. This is the most northern Peruvian point that regularly works on the S-SW swell train and also where the Humboldt Current runs out of steam. Winter sees all size swells wrap around the tip and hit a minefield of sharp, barnacle encrusted rocks, throwing up rapid tube sections that require high board speed and positioning to escape. Packs loads of punch and although the reef isn't in your face like Cabo Blanco, getting caught inside here is almost worse. Some call this one of the best waves in South America and more rewarding than it's illustrious neighbour, plus it can handle more size. Paddle out from the beach or take a chance with the rock dance off the point.","id":2195},"cabo blanquillo":{"description":"If Cabo Blanco is crowded, check other spots to the south like Cabo Blanquillo a left reef that needs some sand to get classic. Very exposed to wind so it's an early or late spot.","id":2196},"el nuro":{"description":"Just south of a tiny fishing village and long pier, El Nuro is more of a reef left than a proper pointbreak, which picks up N swell and can be a fun, high-performance wave with crumbling lips and forgiving cutback walls. Sand covered rock shelf and a lack of thick crowds makes this wave accessible to improvers. ","id":2197},"punta restin":{"description":"Punta Restin is exposed and isolated, bending in S swells to a line-up that is far from orderly. Sections off and closes-out if direction is not quite right. You’ll find the Panama currents influence waning down here and the water will be 2°-3°c (5°-7°F) colder than in Mancora. ","id":2198},"yacila":{"description":"Yacila is protected from the strong winds by a large rock, attracting local bodyboarders to the mediocre, beachbreak close-outs in summertime NW swells. Handles onshore W wind quite well.","id":2199},"punta negra (piura)":{"description":"Punta Negra is due west of Paita and picks up any tiny swell that is out there. S-SW is better, hopefully producing some fast lefts across the straight sandbars, instead of shut-downs. Really only a small swell option.","id":2200},"punta ballenas":{"description":"If Mancora is small or the swell is from the SW-W, a walk of about 5 min to the south will reveal Punta Ballenas, a left point that picks up a bit more swell. It’s usually a messy, sectiony wave and will close-out if the swell is from the NW or the tide is too low, but it’s much faster and hollower than the main point. ","id":2201},"punta arena (piura)":{"description":"Water temps drop drastically in Talara as the water can be 2°c (5°F) colder on the south side of town than on the north. It rarely breaks, but when it does Punta Arena is a quality lefthand point, which is best at low tide with a moderate swell. Quite sectiony and can be mushy, since the wind gets into it easily.","id":2202},"punta lobo":{"description":"Water temps drop drastically in Talara as the water can be 2°c (5°F) colder on the south side of town than on the north. South of town, El Golf is the go to spot for any swell from S to NW which is likely to produce that rarest of things in Peru - hollow righthanders! Punchy, fast and cylindrical, these peaks can be picture perfect when all the points are sleeping, but as it gets bigger, the swirling currents make this break a thorough workout.","id":2203},"punta aguja":{"description":"The beaches of Bayovar, 150km SW of Piura are arguably the last pristine beaches in Peru. Consisting of wide bays, fringed by white granite rocky formations and dunes, these beaches are washed by crystal-clear waters filled with dolphins, turtles and flocks of seabirds. Punta Aguja marks the spot where the Equatorial Counter Current loses the battle against the Humboldt, meaning the water gets radically colder south of this rocky point. The beaches leading down to Nonura can hold a fun peak or two and act as a diversion from the point when it is too small. Easily blown out.","id":2204},"punta tur":{"description":"A bit further along the Bayovar headland lays Punta Tur another great lefthander. It breaks further away from the shore than Nonura, resulting in really long waves, although it peels so fast that the ride is usually split into different sections. When everything aligns like 10ft of SW swell, ESE winds and low incoming tide, T-Land can resemble its Indonesian namesake. Punta Tur also suffers from really strong currents, making jetskis a highly desirable tool. ","id":2205},"punta prieta":{"description":"AKA El Brujo where discoveries of ancient civilisations have been unearthed. Exposed wind-affected reefbreak that might line up some nice shorter left sections on small S swells and glassy or E winds. Some beach peaks to the north.","id":2206},"silver sands":{"description":"Silver Sands holds peaks over a beach/reef combo that sucks in SE swell and produces some hollow rights. ","id":2207},"freights":{"description":"Freights probably has the best lefts on the south coast, but it rarely lines-up, since a big S swell is required. Long, fast and hollow when on, there are 3 defined sections starting at the cliffs on the point, where feathered walls flow into the central reef barrels and if you are lucky, more bowls through the inside. Has many moods when small with plenty of shorter rights and lazy, longboard shoulders that make this a useful beginner spot. ","id":2208},"surfer's point - barbados":{"description":"Surfers Point can be a fun left set-up with cruisey shoulders bending into the bay and providing a bit of protection from the nor'easters. There are some rights too, with the emphasis on fun, easy rides, making it the ideal home for Zed’s surf hire/school.","id":2209},"tent bay":{"description":"Tent Bay, a powerful left, walls up and spins down the reef on a straight N swell. ","id":2210},"parlors":{"description":"It’s only a 300m paddle down to Parlours, an expanse of peaking right and left runners that seem to improve as the swell builds. Less power and intensity than Soup Bowls on any given day and a scatter gun line-up keeps crowds low and paddling high, especially at double-overhead.","id":2211},"sand bank":{"description":"A 10 minute walk north of Bathsheba, Sandbank or Cattlewash as it is also known, looks like an ideal open beachbreak for beginners. However this stretch is strafed by rips and currents and the line-up is usually messy, unless the right near the rocks is working, so it's better suited to experienced surfers who will get the best from the dumpy close-outs and onshore slop.","id":2212},"brandons":{"description":"Close to Bridgetown is Brandons, a sandy reef peak that only works on big hurricane or SE windswells and is offshore in NE trades. Mainly groomed, speedy lefts with the odd tuck section, or fleeting, rounder rights. ","id":2213},"maycocks":{"description":"The long, tapering shoulders of Maycocks, are a fun alternative to Duppies and will always be smaller and more manageable on a big wrapping N swell. Low to mid tide is preferred and the trades are always offshore. Handles the biggest swells on an outside section that keeps the chargers happy.","id":2214},"tropicana":{"description":"Speedy left barrels over urchin-covered, fire coral reef makes Tropicana a treacherous left for experts only, who usually choose high tide for their tube time.","id":2215},"conset point":{"description":"Conset Point is a rarely surfed mysto right needing a serious N swell to get classic. ","id":2216},"ragged point":{"description":"Beneath the lighthouse at Ragged Point, a powerful, mid to high tide shorey hits the sand when the swell is E-SE. Any N in the swell will mean plenty of close-outs, but the cliffy headlands help with the wind and it consistently picks up all available energy. ","id":2217},"ocós":{"description":"Less than 10km (6mi) away from the Mexican border, Ocos provides the first surf opportunity where the rivermouth builds occasionally good sandbars. ","id":2219},"la barra - likin":{"description":"From Puerto San Jose to Monterrico lies the longest stretch of coastal road in Guatemala, allowing multiple beaches to be checked out without really leaving the highway. 5km (3mi) after Puerto San Jose is Balneario Likin, one of the country’s only high-end coastal resorts. The surf also ranks among the best in the country, with hollow rivermouth and jetty peaks at La Barra, rideable till slightly overhead. Needs low incoming tide or slack high to avoid the killer rip. Often long and predictable, the righthander is a great ride with hollow pockets interspersed by slashable shoulders. The left off the peak sucks hard and leads straight onto the rocky tip of the jetty, often closing-out. The sandbars shift around affecting shape and quality and the river flow causes hectic rips on dropping tides, but low incoming or even dead high on big swells is the time to surf. There is a surf camp nearby and some local surfers come down from Puerto San Jose, but generally crowds are not a problem.","id":2220},"chulamar":{"description":"The beach of Chulamar isn’t as steep as neighbouring ones and on a small swell there’s well-organised waves. ","id":2221},"iztapa":{"description":"A new jetty in the fishing port of Iztapa builds up the sand on the east side, offering longer, hollower waves on chunkier SW swells. There’s more peaks around, it just depends on whether the sand is in otherwise it’ll be close-out city. Higher tides needed, rips guaranteed ","id":2222},"el paredón":{"description":"El Parédon lies on the other side of the Canal de Chiquimulilla; a surf camp is set-up in this fishing community, facing a fast breaking beachbreak best on a high tide. ","id":2223},"capoon's bay":{"description":"Tortola is the largest of these islands and the BVI capital, thanks to an important yacht harbour in Road Town. The north shore of the island is dotted with a series of bays and beaches offering a good diversity of surfing locations. Capoon’s Bay, a.k.a. Little Apple Bay, holds a perfectly symmetrical A-frame reef that should provide a buzz, as does the mushroom tea sometimes served at Bomba’s Shack, just in front of the break. While getting high is not everyone’s cup of tea, a user friendly, walling wave that can handle big swells and remain unaffected by the trades, most definitely is! ","id":2224},"west end":{"description":"Anegada is completely different from all the other British Virgin Islands in that this coral island’s highest point is only 10m (30ft) above sea level, in fact the whole island looks just like a giant beach. The surrounding reef is a popular diving area and wide exposure to the wind probably makes it better for sailboarding. West End Point is actually a great windsurf spot, but if the wind drops or goes south, a long righthand pointbreak will reveal itself. It can either be a mellow, cruisey wave or turn heavy with huge rips. ","id":2225},"log cabins":{"description":"Log Cabins is an underrated right that shifts around a lot over an ill-defined reef, relying on peaky N swells to prevent it from shutting down violently. It breaks over a treacherous lava bottom that has sharp, upthrusting fingers and sand fills the gaps in places. From shoulder to overhead it is accessible to experienced riders, but as the size rises, it becomes increasingly malevolent and twisted. ","id":2226},"backyards":{"description":"Scattergun peaks stalk the exposed, wide reef flanking Sunset, providing a crowd-free option for those willing to take the inevitable beating Backyards is famous for. Extremely hard for paddle surfers to manage, it has become the domain of wind, kite and tow surfers when the swell jumps up. Outside Backyards will suck in more ocean swell than Waimea and 50ft + faces are on the cards.  ","id":2232},"off-the-wall":{"description":"Off-The-Wall (a.k.a Kodak Reef) is the classic, high quality, super-crowded, right sprint that's been a favourite with photographers since the '70s. Separated from Pipe by a short channel, swells need to arrive with N in them to get the rights opening up over what is essentially a straight bit of reef. Smaller, less perfect lefts peel back towards Backdoor and may offer visitors more of a chance of actually catching a wave, because the crowds can be very intense. Shallow and unforgiving, but barrels guaranteed at mid-tide on an overhead NW swell.","id":2233},"rockpile/heisler park":{"description":"Hazardous, rocky Laguna Beach righthander best during bigger SW swells. Take-off behind large rock. Needs high tide.","id":2578},"lagoons":{"description":"Nine ferries a day make the 20min journey from Hobart to Bruny Island, home of some big waves that hold size better than most Tassie breaks. Furthest west is a rivermouth spot called Lagoons, where potentially long rights can be witnessed with a big swell, the right sandbank, higher tides and W-NW winds. ","id":2243},"broadbeach":{"description":"Broadbench is a continuation of the Surfers Paradise theme with plenty of fun beachbreaks to choose from, which range from straight-handers to long workable walls. Occasionally fires off some good barrels at lower tides and picks up NE swells better than SE, which shows better further north. This whole stretch will close-out when the swell is over 6-8ft, which is when all the pointbreaks will be working.","id":2247},"long track":{"description":"The surf becomes less crowded and more powerful down towards Wurtulla and Long Track in the Currimundi Lake Conservation Park. When the lake flows out, the banks can get some sharp shape and assemble long, peeling walls in winter westerlies. Not far from the Anne St reef where powerful lefts and rights appear on moderate swells.","id":2248},"mudjimba island":{"description":"En-route to Maroochydore, are the serious waves of Mudjimba Island, aka Woman Island. Legend has it that the island is the ‘head’ of a nearby mountain, which was decapitated. The island provides a rocky base for some chunky lefts and grinding, ledgy rights that wrap around the ends of the island. Air drops and dry sucks are common, making this a favourite with the bodyboarders. Go to the opposite end from where the wind is blowing to get protection. The left at the south end is longer, with multi barrel opportunities in NW to N winds. Careful surfers will hire a boat, as the 30min paddle back is arduous and scary in the sharky waters. Always much bigger than the town beachbreaks, which are often nice and peaky as swell refracts around the island and hits at funny angles.","id":2249},"peregian creek":{"description":"Coolum has many access routes leading to numerous beachbreaks like Peregian Beach. Pitta Street, at the south end of town, has long been the focus since slabs of coffee rock hold the sand together when the surf hits a bit bigger from the SE. Ripable peaks and good shorey sections on high tides.","id":2250},"greenmount":{"description":"At the eastern end of Coolangatta beach, the tree lined  Greenmount Point provides a curve of boulders for the sand to stick to, resulting in some long easy rights and a bit of protection from the dreaded SE winds. However, since the advent of the Tweed River sand-pumping program and the miraculous appearance of the 'Superbank', Greenmount's bay and the adjacent Coolangatta Beach have been swallowed by sand and tacked onto the Snapper, Rainbow endless line-up. It still shows some of it's longboarding heritage and can be less sucky than further up the line, but then again it can churn off relentlessly towards Big Groyne Kirra if it is in the right mood. Handles more NE in the swell which breaks up the sections and any S wind. ","id":2251},"narrowneck":{"description":"Narrowneck used to be off the surfer’s radar until an artificial reef was built to create an erosion protection solution to prevent the beach being inundated during storm swells. While this part of the project is considered to have worked, the bonus surfing wave has been attracting plenty of takers since the sandbags trip up a decent right on SE swells and a left in NE'ers. 'Naz' is not the most exciting wave but can provide more shape on junky, onshore days than the long expanses of Surfers Paradise beaches stretching south. On it's good days, there's pits to be found and a bit of extra power over the reef, plus a shorey section that bodyboarders like. Gets crowded as it is the first stop from Brisbane, is a regular local contest site and attracts more for the novelty factor to see what an artificial reef wave is like.","id":2252},"boiling pot":{"description":"Noosa became a surfing Mecca back in the ‘60s, so expect heavy crowds, especially during cyclones. The five points all differ slightly; First Point is mellow, smaller and perfect for beginners. Johnsons is slightly bigger and faster, but still easy. Boiling Pot is the outside take-off section of National Park, which diminishes in size as it heads towards Johnsons. A bit more rocky and sucky on take-off with a speed section that will either fat out or transport you into Nationals and hopefully beyond. Best waves will appear on headhigh to overhead NE-E swells, low to mid tide to keep off the rocks and any wind from SE to SW. ","id":2253},"the spit":{"description":"From Sea World you can take a look at the Spit, which receives plenty of swell. It isn’t quite as developed as the rest of this coast and has tons of empty peaks stretching as far as Main Beach. The main event is usually a left breaking between the Southport Seaway jetty and the Spit Sand-pumping jetty, which provides plenty of raw materials for nice banks, both here and over the rivermouth at South Stradbroke Island. It's other fine quality is being able to tame the NE sea breezes better than any Goldy spot. The Spit is popular with tourists and beginners because there is less hassling and the waves are generally slopey and manageable when small. Can get  hollow in a stronger, moderate swell, but it closes out as it exceeds 6-8ft faces, plus the currents can ramp up quickly. The northern jetty is the most easily accessible of the South Straddie breaks and the trim peaks get insanely crowded as many dash across the channel that is famous for as much shark traffic as boat traffic.","id":2254},"punta rocas":{"description":"Punta Rocas is by far the most consistent and unfortunately most crowded spot in the area. It's a peak off a blunt headland and the line-up favours rights, which work from tiny to triple overhead without closing out. Muscular walls bump and grind down the bouldery reef, with a receding lip-line that invites blasting off the top and snapping back towards the power, of which there is plenty. Can have some hollow moments, especially at higher tides as it breaks closer on the rocks, but the lefts are more tubey in smaller SW swells, albeit lacking the walliness of the rights. Most paddle-out from the southside, where the tricky shorebreak is often ridden by bodyboarders. NE is dead offshore, but any E in the wind will be fine.","id":2258},"playa norte":{"description":"Playa Norte is another popular summer beach with weekend visitors from Lima, causing the rights at the north end to get busy. The mix of boulders and sand can have some shape along the beach although it is usually short slammers for the bodyboard crew. The rights will work better on the push and are a small swell option as the beach gets real heavy and closes-out with some short barrels. Around the headland to the south is El Paso, a powerful, punishing righthander over boulders in a strong S-SW swell.","id":2259},"señoritas":{"description":"Señoritas breaks left with power and purpose across 3 sections of rocky reef attached to the southern headland of the Señoritas/Caballeros bay. Purposeful walls with slabby lips and the odd tube moment, march across the line-up in most swells and there is a bit of S wind protection, but not in the classical Peruvian point sense. At low tide, there are a few rocks that pop, so incoming is better.","id":2261},"el huayaco":{"description":"Huayco peaks up directly in front of the dry creek mouth, doing a 200m left point impression, plus a bonus short right. From a predictably vertical drop-in, tapered ripable walls fan down the boulders with a mix of crumbly lips to launch from and some sucky chandelier pipes at the shallower spots. Works on smaller swells than Santa and Pena Rosa and is a bit less intimidating. Better with W in the swell and incoming tides.","id":2262},"caballeros":{"description":"Caballeros and Señoritas are so named, because in the past, men and women were segregated into their own beaches. Caballeros is probably the best and most reliable righthander in the Punta Hermosa region, drawing in S to W swells onto a jutting headland reef. It starts off with a sucky spurt, then walls and shoulders as it bends onto the shallower parts of the reef, before hitting some hollow sections in the inside. Good power and just the right speed make it a favourite with intermediate and experienced regular-footers. Wont hold quite as much size or power as Señoritas and works best at mid incoming as a few rocks can break up the wave at low tide unless it is big.","id":2263},"pulpos":{"description":"Pulpos is a wide-open, exposed beachbreak that picks up all the available from both south and north, providing it is not too big to transform the banks into one big straight-hander. Can be steep and fast with barrels that favour those happy to hit lips as it closes-out, namely bodyboarders. There are better waves in the area heading north towards Arica and the other bonus is the peaks seem to line-up better on the rights.","id":2264},"triangulo":{"description":"There are more boulder beaches in the Agua Dulce area and Triangulo is the one when all the other beaches are closed-out. It’s very protected from both swell and wind, creating mellow, rolling peaks that don’t break well very often. ","id":2265},"laniakea":{"description":null,"id":3672},"barranquito":{"description":"Barranquito is an organized jetty left, that was popular during the '60s and '70s. Rights also break on the other side of the jetty and back towards the left. It's usually smaller than the breaks to the north, but occasionally shows a bit better shape when the boulders and sand are just right.","id":2268},"villa":{"description":"South of Lima, Villa is a small swell beach where hollow, punchy peaks need slack wind conditions. Good option when other breaks are struggling, but can get heavy closeouts and strong longshore currents.","id":2269},"pavos":{"description":"South of Miraflores, the popular Barranco district’s beaches face NW, requiring larger S to SW swells to wrap in. They also work on NW swell. Pavos has a nice sandy beach, but this beachbreak is only suitable for bodyboarders. Shoredump launchpads as the water is deep between here and the outside bar.","id":2270},"redondo":{"description":"On the southern side of the Makaha jetty is Redondo, where a fairly reliable left breaks with all the same hallmarks of the neighbouring breaks. Soft, slow and forgiving for the crowds of beginners and improvers who come here. A bit less paddling as it is generally better inside the jetty.","id":2271},"waikiki":{"description":"Waikiki’s soft breaking rights and lefts prove enjoyable on a longboard as it breaks outside and reforms when bigger or else mushy peaks inside the jetties on SW swells. Mid tide on the rise until high tide generally makes it too fat to contemplate. Like Makaha, the paddle-out can be long and tiring.","id":2272},"makaha":{"description":"Makaha is on the north side of the jetty that holds the famous (but overpriced) La Rosa Nautica restaurant on the protruding pier. Like many of the beachbreaks along the Miraflores stretch, power is lacking and rolling, slopey walls are the norm. It can also be a long tiring paddle searching for the outside sets, so use the channels beside the jetty or surf the inside reforms on a floaty board. Probably a bit better on lower tides and early in the day before the onshore pushes in chop that doesn't really improve the gutless rides. Closes-out when it gets overhead and everyone starts to head south for more protection.","id":2273},"pampilla":{"description":"La Pampilla looks just the same as Punta Roquitas with small conditions, but the shifty peaks develop into a better right in larger swells. Rolling faces and easy shoulders make this a favourite with the longboard crew. Small swells need low tide and big swells will hold up at higher tide when the paddling and duck-diving can be a chore to get out the back. There's more waves at the adjacent beaches of Tres Picos.","id":2274},"el gringo":{"description":"Sometimes nicknamed the Chilean Pipeline, El Gringo is another tubular A-frame crashing close to the shore with serious power. It’s a fast wave too, pushing surfers to go for broke and score a great barrel or get slammed on the reef. The left is the real deal with compression tubes and a more predictable rate of speed and openness, once the lurching air-drop has been negotiated. Paddling out to the left is fraught with nose-crunching duck dives and currents that can hold you in the impact zone for an eternity. Meanwhile, the symmetry-balancing right holds a bigger SW swell and throws wide before triangulating the wall into deeper water that provides a far safer paddling channel back to the peak. Tide is dependant on size, as it is usually the small swells that lure victims onto the barely watered rocky platform. ","id":2276},"la isla":{"description":"La Isla is one of the most highly regarded breaks around, especially on summer northerly swell days where the lefthander forms a hollow wall with tubing sections. It breaks really close to the rocks and needs a medium-size swell to be at its best. ","id":2277},"el brazo":{"description":"The Alacrán Peninsula used to be an island before being connected to the land when the port of Arica was built in the ‘60s. El Brazo’s sand-covered reef breaks at the northern tip of the island off the elbow jetty and requires a large wrapping swell and S-SW winds. When on, it’s a large tubular A-frame with more chance of making the rights, which stay open longer. ","id":2278},"el puerto":{"description":"The rights breaking south of El Puerto (the port) are seldom ridden as most of the action occurs around Alacrán.  ","id":2279},"el buey":{"description":"El Buey is a big wave arena, 700m (2100ft) offshore from the modern beach scene of playa El Laucho. Even though it can break both ways, the left remains the better option, as it’s always hollower than the right. The left will focus S-SSW swells into booming barrels, while the right will wall up anything with more W in it and offer roller coaster walls. The spot can hold 20ft (6m), but is quite wind sensitive. ","id":2280},"la brava":{"description":"There’s another similar big wave spot called La Capilla, 4km south of town on the way to which, the road passes Playa Brava and Arenillas Negras, two beachbreaks favouring rights. Brava is smaller and there are plenty of rocks on the north side of the bay which can hold some smaller rights.","id":2281},"arenillas negras":{"description":" Arenillas Negras is a wider exposed beachbreak but still scattered with rocks and rarely lines up much more than some short mid tide slides and calmer inside whitewash for the beginners. Just to the south however, is a mental bodyboarding, righthand slab called El Rancio where super-thick, below sea-level tubes explode in SW-W swells up to 12ft and any E wind.","id":2283},"el tubo":{"description":"El Tubo is a right breaking next to the pier, but despite its name is more of a beginner-friendly break. Will work better on NW swells and like the beachies to the north, prefers high tide.","id":2284},"las machas":{"description":"In the summer of 1983, the first Arica surf championship, maybe the first in the country, was held in playa Las Machas. This long stretch of beach is super-consistent and peaks abound. The waves are usually better around high tide and although the sandbanks shift a lot, it’s usually worth checking the Rio Lluta mouth which marks the end of the beach. Many Ariqueños and tourists will set up their tents here in the summertime. Playa Chinchorro is the natural southerly extension of Las Machas. ","id":2285},"pozo verde":{"description":"Some 80km (50mi) north of Antofagasta, the small bay of Pozo Verde has surf on both sides, with both left and right points that get perfect around 6ft (2m). ","id":2286},"punta una":{"description":"Punta Una is another barrelling wave that sucks hard off the reef with the end section going almost dry, especially at high tide. The left on the other side of the peak is called Mauro and is shorter, but just as intense. Another booger wave with room for only the best air-drop to tube stand-ups. Works well in smaller swells hence the crowding problems.","id":2287},"punta dos":{"description":"Punta Dos is a barrelling wave that explodes on a gnarled reef. It is an uncompromising wave that will punish the hesitant and therefore for experienced surfers only. It's mainly bodyboarders in the line-up and while it appears to be a righthand point-style set-up, there are lefts depending on the swell angle.","id":2288},"colegio":{"description":"Iquique's banner spot is Colegio, found just opposite the main high school. It's a thick, muscle-bound right that pumps up nicely as the swell increases and will handle up to the triple-overhead mark fairly effortlessly. Following the local trend for vertical drops into a draining barrel section, the difference here is it can keep spinning down the line for a good 100m. Picture perfect in the sparkling morning glass, it is still a challenging prospect and lesser surfers should beware. Handles most tides through the size range and prefers the push, with high giving more room for error on the peak. Needs at least headhigh conditions to start breaking and just gets better from there.","id":2289},"la urraca":{"description":"Las Urracas starts off looking all the world a nice peak, but only the left has a future as it walls and barrels down the surprisingly shallow reef to a narrow channel. The right becomes El Colegio a bit further down and many use the easier paddle-out via Urracas to get there.","id":2290},"punta gruesa":{"description":null,"id":2291},"intendencia":{"description":"Intendencia is a challenging and very heavy left that has to be perfect in order to be makeable. Massive power is concentrated on the peak and gets square and slabby when there is less than a full tide covering the reef. This makes the take-off beyond vert and often unmakeable for all but the best stand-ups and bodyboarders.","id":2292},"andrómeda":{"description":"Another wave worth searching for is the hollow and powerful right called Andrómeda; it holds up to 9ft (2.8m) and is never too crowded. ","id":2293},"pietra del lobo":{"description":"The W-NW orientation of the coast between Antofagasta and Cabo Jara makes for some good lefthand set-ups. The first wave in Antofagasta, Piedra del Lobo is a classic left holding up to 9ft (2.8m) with rides 100m long. ","id":2294},"ram5":{"description":"Ram5 is a very powerful left breaking very close to the rocks, making entry and exit quite difficult. The piece of land facing it is owned by the military but surfers always find their way in. ","id":2295},"la cãºpula":{"description":"Regularly picked as a national contest site, Cúpula is regarded as the best wave in the zone. It breaks best at 6-12ft (2-4m) and locals compare it to Tavarua. Exaggeration or not, the wave is indeed a long left with several tubular sections, breaking over magma rock reef. The occasional shorter right can be ridden as well. ","id":2296},"budeo":{"description":"Just north of Antofagasta, Budeo is an excellent right reefbreak, powerful and tubular. It’s regularly crowded with bodyboarders looking for small but clean tubes. ","id":2297},"isla santa maria":{"description":"Isla Santa Maria, a desert island 1.6km (1mi) offshore, hosts three distinct breaks. One is a giant, deep-water A-frame, while the other two reefbreaks are left points best surfed around 6ft (2m). ","id":2298},"reñaca":{"description":"North of Santiago’s Viña del Mar beach, are the Reñaca beach breaks, a very popular wave, especially in the summer, with an excess of learners on bodyboards. Like Ritoque, the action is all up the north end, concentrated near the pile of boulders that help hold the sandbanks and form some some short sharp wedges that barrel quickly before shutting down. Lots of ramps to launch off and handles some size, all tides and even a bit of onshore wind if you are desperate. ","id":2299},"las salinas (pichilemu)":{"description":"When the exposed beachbreaks are blown or maxed out, it’s best to head to the sheltered spots like the high tide breaking Las Salinas. It's a mini pointbreak tucked into the pocket beach between Renaca and Vina del Mar's main beach. Needs a good humping S-SW swell over 2-3m to start breaking and isn't a very long ride with tapered walls and short bowls over the bigger boulders. The beachbreak is dumpy and usually a straight-hander.","id":2300},"dreamland":{"description":"Beneath the shadow of the hulking, metropolis-scale hotel, golf course and condo development that sprawls across the Bukit from Balangan to Bingin, this once tranquil beach is now a tourist hotspot, with all mod cons, but very little soul. The wave is well suited to the masses, offering a short left wall and shouldering right off the peak, over a sandy reef platform that is good and deep. Best at low tides, otherwise i