Raspberry Pi
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The Raspberry Pi 2 Model B is the second generation Raspberry Pi. It replaced the original Raspberry Pi 1 Model B+ in February 2015. Compared to the Raspberry Pi 1 it has:

  • A 900MHz quad-core ARM Cortex-A7 CPU
  • 1GB RAM

Like the (Pi 1) Model B+, it also has:

  • 4 USB ports
  • 40 GPIO pins
  • Full HDMI port
  • Ethernet port
  • Combined 3.5mm audio jack and composite video
  • Camera interface (CSI)
  • Display interface (DSI)
  • Micro SD card slot
  • VideoCore IV 3D graphics core

Because it has an ARMv7 processor, it can run the full range of ARM GNU/Linux distributions, including Snappy Ubuntu Core, as well as Microsoft Windows 10 (see the blog for more information).

The Raspberry Pi 2 has an identical form factor to the previous (Pi 1) Model B+ and has complete compatibility with Raspberry Pi 1.

We recommend the Raspberry Pi 2 Model B for use in schools: it offers more flexibility for learners than the leaner (Pi 1) Model A+, which is more useful for embedded projects and projects which require very low power.

The Raspberry Pi 3 is the third generation Raspberry Pi. It replaced the Raspberry Pi 2 Model B in February 2016. Compared to the Raspberry Pi 2 it has:

  • A 1.2GHz 64-bit quad-core ARMv8 CPU
  • 802.11n Wireless LAN
  • Bluetooth 4.0
  • Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE)

Like the Pi 2, it also has:

  • 4 USB ports
  • 40 GPIO pins
  • Full HDMI port
  • Ethernet port
  • Combined 3.5mm audio jack and composite video
  • Camera interface (CSI)
  • Display interface (DSI)
  • Micro SD card slot (now push-pull rather than push-push)
  • VideoCore IV 3D graphics core

The Raspberry Pi 3 has an identical form factor to the previous Pi 2 (and Pi 1 Model B+) and has complete compatibility with Raspberry Pi 1 and 2.

We recommend the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B for use in schools, or for any general use. Those wishing to embed their Pi in a project may prefer the Pi Zero or Model A+, which are more useful for embedded projects, and projects which require very low power.

The Model B+ is the final revision of the original Raspberry Pi. It replaced the Model B in July 2014 and was superseded by the Raspberry Pi 2 Model B in February 2015. Compared to the Model B it has:

  • More GPIO. The GPIO header has grown to 40 pins, while retaining the same pinout for the first 26 pins as the Model A and B.
  • More USB. We now have 4 USB 2.0 ports, compared to 2 on the Model B, and better hotplug and overcurrent behaviour.
  • Micro SD. The old friction-fit SD card socket has been replaced with a much nicer push-push micro SD version.
  • Lower power consumption. By replacing linear regulators with switching ones we’ve reduced power consumption by between 0.5W and 1W.
  • Better audio. The audio circuit incorporates a dedicated low-noise power supply.
  • Neater form factor. We’ve aligned the USB connectors with the board edge, moved composite video onto the 3.5mm jack, and added four squarely-placed mounting holes.

The Model B+ is perfectly suitable for use in schools: it offers more flexibility for learners than the leaner Model A or A+, which are more useful for embedded projects and projects which require very low power, and has more USB ports than the Model B.

The Raspberry Pi camera module can be used to take high-definition video, as well as stills photographs. It’s easy to use for beginners, but has plenty to offer advanced users if you’re looking to expand your knowledge. There are lots of examples online of people using it for time-lapse, slow-motion and other video cleverness. You can also use the libraries we bundle with the camera to createeffects.

If you’re interested in the nitty-gritty, you’ll want to know that the  module has a five megapixel fixed-focus camera that supports 1080p30, 720p60 and VGA90 video modes, as well as stills capture. It attaches via a 15cm ribbon cable to the CSI port on the Raspberry Pi.

The camera works with all models of Raspberry Pi 1 and 2. It can be accessed through the MMAL and V4L APIs, and there are numerous third-party libraries built for it, including the Picamera Python library.

The camera module is very popular in home security applications, and in wildlife camera traps.

The Raspberry Pi Zero is half the size of a Model A+, with twice the utility. A tiny Raspberry Pi that’s affordable enough for any project!

  • 1Ghz, Single-core CPU
  • 512MB RAM
  • Mini HDMI and USB On-The-Go ports
  • Micro USB power
  • HAT-compatible 40-pin header
  • Composite video and reset headers

The Raspberry Pi Zero Wireless extends the Pi Zero family. Launched at the end of February 2017, the Pi Zero Wireless has all the functionality of the original Pi Zero but with added connectivity, consisting of:

  • 802.11 b/g/n wireless LAN
  • Bluetooth 4.1
  • Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE)

Like the Pi Zero, it also has:

  • 1GHz, single-core CPU
  • 512MB RAM
  • Mini HDMI and USB On-The-Go ports
  • Micro USB power
  • HAT-compatible 40-pin header
  • Composite video and reset headers
  • CSI camera connector

The Model A+ is the low-cost variant of the Raspberry Pi. It replaced the original Model A in November 2014. Compared to the Model A it has:

  • More GPIO. The GPIO header has grown to 40 pins, while retaining the same pinout for the first 26 pins as the Model A and B.
  • Micro SD. The old friction-fit SD card socket has been replaced with a much nicer push-push micro SD version.
  • Lower power consumption. By replacing linear regulators with switching ones we’ve reduced power consumption by between 0.5W and 1W.
  • Better audio. The audio circuit incorporates a dedicated low-noise power supply.
  • Smaller, neater form factor. We’ve aligned the USB connector with the board edge, moved composite video onto the 3.5mm jack, and added four squarely-placed mounting holes. Model A+ is approximately 2cm shorter than the Model A.

We recommend the Model A+ for for embedded projects and projects which require very low power, and which do not require Ethernet or multiple USB ports.

Model B is the higher-spec variant of Raspberry Pi 1 (superseded by Raspberry Pi 2 Model B), with 512 MB of RAM, two USB ports and a 100mb Ethernet port.

The 7″ Touchscreen Monitor for Raspberry Pi gives users the ability to create all-in-one, integrated projects such as tablets, infotainment systems and embedded projects. The 800 x 480 display connects via an adapter board which handles power and signal conversion. Only two connections to the Pi are required; power from the Pi’s GPIO port and a ribbon cable that connects to the DSI port present on all Raspberry Pis.  Touchscreen drivers with support for 10-finger touch and an on-screen keyboard will be integrated into the latest Raspbian OS for full functionality without a physical keyboard or mouse.

  • Turn your Raspberry Pi into a touch screen tablet, infotainment system, or standalone device.
  • Truly Interactive – the latest software drivers will support a virtual ‘on screen’ keyboard, so there is no need to plug in a keyboard and mouse.
  • Make your own Internet of Things (IoT) devices including a visual display. Simply connect your Raspberry Pi, develop a Python script to interact with the display, and you’re ready to create your own home automation devices with touch screen capability.
  • A range of educational software and programs available on the Raspberry Pi will be touch enabled, making learning and programming easier on the Raspberry Pi.

Make your Raspberry Pi into an Astro Pi with the Sense HAT - Pressure, humidity, temperature and orientation sensors combined with a beautiful 8x8 LED matrix!

Attach the HAT to your Pi's GPIO pins and you can use the integrated circuit based sensors for many different types of experiments, applications, and even games.

The sensors enable you to read:

  • Orientation (yaw, pitch & roll) via an accelerometer, 3D gyroscope and magnetometer
  • Pressure
  • Humidity
  • Temperature

The Sense HAT supports a whole host of projects for the Raspberry Pi, it can measure how fast is the Pi itself travelling (i.e. measure your speed), how hot is it? how humid is it? (air humidity), which direction is the Raspberry Pi facing?

The LED Matrix enables you to display the data from the various sensors, it can show you which way is geomagnetic North by programming a compass using the magnetometer, or simply be used to play games like Tetris, Pong and Snake with the joystick. The joystick can also be used to enable a human user to interact with the programs running on the Raspberry Pi Sense HAT.

Writing programs for the Sense HAT is very simple, with a Python library available to get started quickly and easily. For a truly out of world projects check out the AstroPi website http://astro-pi.org/, containing a host of ideas and instructions for using the Raspberry Pi and Sense HAT on the International Space Station (ISS).

This kit comes with the Sense HAT, 4x M2.5 mounting posts and 8x M2.5 screws to securely mount your Sense HAT on your Raspberry Pi.

 

Technical Specification:

  • Gyroscope – angular rate sensor: +/-245/500/2000dps
  • Accelerometer - Linear acceleration sensor: +/-2/4/8/16 g
  • Magnetometer - Magnetic Sensor: +/- 4/8/12/16 gauss
  • Barometer: 260 – 1260 hPa absolute range (accuracy depends on the temperature and pressure, +/- 0.1 hPa under normal conditions)
  • Temperature sensor (Temperature accurate to +/- 2 degC in the 0-65 degC range)
  • Relative Humidity sensor (accurate to +/- 4.5% in the 20-80%rH range, accurate to +/- 0.5 degC in 15-40 degC range)
  • 8x8 LED matrix display
  • Small 5 button joystick

(N.B. When the board heats up (LEDs get warm!), the temperature readings from these sensors may not accurately reflect ambient temperature)

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