ElektroThing's Spark Analyzer Aims to Take the Pain Out of USB Power Delivery Projects

Driven by an Espressif ESP32-C3, this debugging tool lets you control and monitor voltage and current from a companion smartphone app.

Gareth Halfacree
6 months ago β€’ Debugging / HW101 / Productivity

Cambridge, UK-based elektroThing is looking to make it easier to work with USB Power Delivery (PD) projects with the Spark Analyzer, a compact tool built around an Espressif ESP32-C3 and designed for power monitoring and manipulation.

"Spark Analyzer [is] an innovative ESP32-powered USB Type-C Power Delivery (UCPD) compatible device designed to streamline the development and debugging process for projects and prototypes," explains elektroThing's YJ of the device. "With its compact and sleek design, wireless control, adjustable voltage output, and more, Spark Analyzer is your go-to solution for power delivery and analysis."

The compact Spark Analyzer, with its eye-catching extended PCB antenna, is built around an Espressif ESP32-C3 system-on-chip connected to a Fairchild FUSB302MPX USB Power Delivery control chip and a Cross Chip CC6904SO-10A current sensor and Diodes Incorporated DMP3017SFG-7 field-effect transistor (FET). A USB Type-C connector accepts incoming power and data, while the negotiated voltage β€” 5V, 9V, 15V, or 20V β€” comes out to a screw terminal.

"With Spark Analyzer, developers can effortlessly monitor and manipulate voltage levels, log data, and analyze power consumption through a user-friendly and intuitive smartphone interface," YJ claims, though with the proviso that said app is still in active development.

"This versatile device features both Wi-Fi and BLE [Bluetooth Low Energy] connectivity," YJ continues, "enabling wireless control and data logging, eliminating the need for cumbersome physical buttons, and facilitating remote operation from a distance."

The Spark Analyzer is due to begin crowdfunding on Crowd Supply in the near future; its design files and source code have already been published to GitHub under the permissive MIT license.

Gareth Halfacree
Freelance journalist, technical author, hacker, tinkerer, erstwhile sysadmin. For hire: freelance@halfacree.co.uk.
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