Things used in this project

Hardware components:
Ardgen 101
Arduino 101 & Genuino 101
×1
Tens70
9V battery (generic)
×1
Adafruit industries ada80 image 75px
9V to Barrel Jack Connector
×1
SparkFun Addressable LED strip (Bare)
You get 4 Infinity Kaleidoscopes per strip!
×1
11026 02
Jumper wires (generic)
×1
100 mm Petri dish
These come in packs of 20 for $5-10
×1
Mirror film
This is enough for several hundred Infinity Kaleidoscopes
×1
Neoprene weather stripping
One spool makes 38 Infinity Kaleidoscopes (cut into 10" strips)
×1
Foam board (cut to 3.5" squares)
×1
double-sided tape or Velcro dots
×1
Software apps and online services:
Ide web
Arduino IDE
Adafruit Neopixel Library
Hand tools and fabrication machines:
09507 01
Soldering iron (generic)
Box Cutter or Xacto Knife
Vinyl Cutter (not required but

Schematics

Assembly Instructions

Code

Handheld_Infinity_KaleidoscopeArduino
/*
  Arduino 101 "Infinity Mirror." The rotation angle of the Arduino 101 changes the lights in a Neopixel strip.
  This code uses the Adafruit Neopixel library. Library installation instructions here: https://learn.adafruit.com/adafruit-neopixel-uberguide/arduino-library-installation
  Make sure you have the latest Intel Curie Core installed.  For more info, visit https://www.arduino.cc/en/Guide/Arduino101
*/

#include "CurieIMU.h"
#include <Adafruit_NeoPixel.h>
#define PIN 6  //// what pin are the NeoPixels connected to?
Adafruit_NeoPixel strip = Adafruit_NeoPixel(15, PIN, NEO_GRB + NEO_KHZ800);  /// the strip is 15 pixels long.  You can change this for the number of pixels in your individual strip.

int tr = 0;  //Some variables to hold "color-target" and "color-current" for smoothing...
int tg = 0;
int tb = 0;
int r = 0;
int g = 0;
int b = 0;

int rawX = 0;  /////  to hold values from the Curie's accelerometer
int rawY = 0;
//int rawZ = 0;
float angle = 0.0;


void setup() {
  // put your setup code here, to run once:

  //Serial.begin(9600);  //for debug.
  CurieIMU.begin();
  CurieIMU.setAccelerometerRange(2);  // Set the acceleromiter range to 2g.

  strip.begin();  //  intialize neopixel strip
  strip.show();   // Initialize all pixels to 'off'
}

void loop() {
  // put your main code here, to run repeatedly:

  // read accelerometer:
  int rawX = CurieIMU.readAccelerometer(X_AXIS);
  int rawY = CurieIMU.readAccelerometer(Y_AXIS);
 // int rawZ = CurieIMU.readAccelerometer(Z_AXIS);


  angle = atan2(rawX, rawY); // the funtion atan2() converts x and y forces into an angle in radians.  cool!  Output is -3.14 to 3.14)

  if (abs(angle) > 2.5) { //  digital pins are down
    ///  turn lights off in this position
    tr = 0;
    tg = 0;
    tb = 0;
    runlights();
  }

  if ((angle > 1.5) && (angle < 2.5)) {
    //make lights white in this position (equal r, g and b.)  Color values can go up to 255, but I find it's bright enough at 100.
    tr = 100;
    tg = 100;
    tb = 100;
    runlights();
  }
  
  else if ((angle < 1.5) && (angle > 0.5)) {
    //make lights red in this position
    tr = 100;
    tg = 0;
    tb = 0;
    runlights();
  }
  
  else if ((angle < 0.5) && (angle > -0.5)) {
    //make lights green in this position
    tr = 0;
    tg = 100;
    tb = 0;
    runlights();
  }
  

  else if ((angle < -1.5) && (angle > -2.5)) {
    //make lights blue in this position
    tr = 0;
    tg = 0;
    tb = 100;
    runlights();
  }

    else if ((angle < -0.5) && (angle > -1.5)) { ////  picking one corner angle for something fun!

theaterChase();  /// these functions are written out at the bottom of the sketch.  
//rainbowCycle(2);

  }
  
  else {
    ////  in case of some unexpected angle, turn lights off.
    tr = 0;
    tg = 0;
    tb = 0;
    runlights();
  }
}

void runlights() {
  /// color smoothing.  Current color moves toward target color...  If target is more than curent, move up, if less, move down.
  if (tr > r + 1) {
    r++;
  }
  if (tg > g + 1) {
    g++;
  }
  if (tb > b + 1) {
    b++;
  }
  if (tr < r) {
    r--;
  }
  if (tg < g) {
    g--;
  }
  if (tb < b) {
    b--;
  }

  //turn all the LEDS to the current r, g, b values.
  for (int i = 0; i < strip.numPixels(); i++) {
    strip.setPixelColor(i, r, g, b);
  }
  strip.show();
  delay(10); //  time delay for simple fade timing.
}

///////////////Special light functions from Adafruit Strandtest Example Code

// Rainbow!  Note- this function blocks new position inputs until it's finished.
void rainbowCycle(uint8_t wait) {
  uint16_t i, j;

  for(j=0; j<256*5; j++) { // 5 cycles of all colors on wheel
    for(i=0; i< strip.numPixels(); i++) {
      strip.setPixelColor(i, Wheel(((i * 256 / strip.numPixels()) + j) & 255));
    }
    strip.show();
    delay(wait);
  }
}

    //////Theater Chase lights from Adafruit strandtest example code.  This takes whatever the curent RGB value is, and does a "theatre chase" effect with it.
  void theaterChase(){  for (int j = 0; j < 3; j++) { //3cycles of chasing
      for (int q = 0; q < 3; q++) {
        for (uint16_t i = 0; i < strip.numPixels(); i = i + 3) {
          strip.setPixelColor(i + q, r, g, b); //turn every third pixel on
        }
        strip.show();

        delay(50);

        for (uint16_t i = 0; i < strip.numPixels(); i = i + 3) {
          strip.setPixelColor(i + q, 0);      //turn every third pixel off
        }
      }
    }
  }

// Input a value 0 to 255 to get a color value.  Used for rainbow effect above.
// The colours are a transition r - g - b - back to r.
uint32_t Wheel(byte WheelPos) {
  WheelPos = 255 - WheelPos;
  if(WheelPos < 85) {
    return strip.Color(255 - WheelPos * 3, 0, WheelPos * 3);
  }
  if(WheelPos < 170) {
    WheelPos -= 85;
    return strip.Color(0, WheelPos * 3, 255 - WheelPos * 3);
  }
  WheelPos -= 170;
  return strip.Color(WheelPos * 3, 255 - WheelPos * 3, 0);
}


////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
/*
   This library is free software; you can redistribute it and/or
   modify it under the terms of the GNU Lesser General Public
   License as published by the Free Software Foundation; either
   version 2.1 of the License, or (at your option) any later version.

   This library is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
   but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
   MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the GNU
   Lesser General Public License for more details.

   You should have received a copy of the GNU Lesser General Public
   License along with this library; if not, write to the Free Software
   Foundation, Inc., 51 Franklin Street, Fifth Floor, Boston, MA  02110-1301  USA
*/

Credits

Lucas dvskjxggcv
Lucas Ainsworth

I'm a designer working in the Maker & Innovator Group at Intel.

Contact

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