Toshiba Outfits Thundersoft Boards with Cortex-M Microcontrollers

Toshiba has recently announced the start of supplying Chinese technology manufacturer Thundersoft with the company’s TMPM3HQFDFG…

Cabe Atwell
a year ago

Toshiba recently announced the start of supplying Chinese technology manufacturer Thundersoft with the company’s TMPM3HQFDFG microcontroller for their M3H-series MCUs for consumer and industrial equipment, which is built on Arm’s Cortex-M3 processor (64K RAM, 512K Flash).

Thundersoft has already released their first MH3-series MCU (in an LQFP144 package) with the TMPM3HQFDFG-equipped TT_M3HQ, which is outfitted with Arduino Uno expansion headers, 3-pin jumper connector for 3.3V or 5V power supply, motor connection header, SeeedGrove header, 2X push switches, 2X DIP switches, and DAP-LINK debugger. All the usual communication options are integrated as well, including I2C, SPI, UART, along with 12-bit ADC, and 8-bit DAC.

“The TT_M3HQ board provides an easy, quick and flexible way for user application development and build prototypes with Toshiba TMPM3HQFDFG microcontroller. The Arduino™ Uno connectivity, expansion headers allow to be expanding the functionality for connecting to several open development platforms, the Seeed Grove connectors and dedicated the Motor control header are supported.”

Since the TT_M3HQ features Arm at its core, it can take advantage of the Mbed OS, which is an open source embedded OS created specifically for IoT applications and includes security, connectivity, RTOS, and driver options for Cortex-M-based microcontrollers. Toshiba states the TMPM3HQFDFG will enable manufacturers to speed up time to market, and expand their business by reflecting the needs of the customers to its product development.

Additional information on Toshiba’s TMPM3HQFDFG microcontroller (including data sheets, manuals, and application notes) can be found on their product page, while more details on Thundersoft’s TT_M3HQ is up on the company’s website.

Related articles
Sponsored articles
Related articles