Hawk Eye: A 3D-Printed Replica of Vianney Halter’s Deep Space Tourbillion

When it comes to timepieces, it’s widely known that famed French watchmaker Abraham-Louis Breguet brought about the first tourbillion- a…

Cabe Atwell
2 years ago3D Printing

When it comes to timepieces, it’s widely known that famed French watchmaker Abraham-Louis Breguet brought about the first tourbillion- a sophisticated type of watch escarpment that counters the effects of gravity by cramming the escarpment and balance wheel in a rotating cage. Precision timepieces are equipped with delicate mechanisms that can be affected by gravity, temperature, and magnetism, making them inaccurate. A tourbillion helps to maintain accurate time by making the escarpment turn around its axis, and they look cool while doing so.

Another famed watchmaker, Vianney Halter, expanded on Breguet’s design and produced the Deep Space Tourbillion, an impressive timepiece modeled after Star Trek: Deep Space Nine’s space station. Like most of us, Maker Alduinien couldn’t afford to buy the $262K watch, but he could build his own version of it with a mess of 3D-printed parts and an Arduino.

As you can see, Alduinien’s Hawk Eye is larger than Halter’s design but offers many of the same components as the more expensive version. All 70+ parts of his device were created using an eMotion Tech i3 Metal Motion 3D printer and functions as any tourbillion does, by placing the escapement, balance, and spring inside of a metal 3-axis cage, with the balance wheel controlling the speed of the spin.

Alduinein states there are two ways to power the gadget with the first being using a traditional weight. However, he says this method isn’t as reliable as the second- which is to use an Arduino Uno to power a servo that regulates the time more accurately. Coupling the Uno with a potentiometer and stepper driver will make it even more accurate by allowing you to fine tune the servo speed for the tourbillion.

Those looking to recreate the Hawk Eye, Alduinien has listed a complete BOM on Thingiverse along with all necessary print files and even an instruction manual showing how to put all the pieces together, including the two different drive methods.

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