AtomSoftTech Unveils AtomDev-SAMD21-C and New Memory LCD-Equipped Port-A-Proggy V2 Boards

One board is designed for general-purpose projects and the other born from a desire to program AVRs on-the-go.

Gareth Halfacree
14 days agoHW101

AtomSoftTech's Jason Lopez has announced a pair of new board designs, the AtomDev-SAMD21-C and a new revision of the Port-A-Proggy — the former aimed at being a general-purpose development board and the latter packing a Sharp Memory LCD panel for on-the-go microcontroller programming.

"AtomDev-SAMD21-C is an awesome average sized PCB," Lopez writes of the first of his boards. "The board is smaller than you think coming in at 1.7 x 2.22 inches or 43.2×56.3mm (around 1.7×2.22"). About half the average credit card size. This board is as basic as it gets. The MCU chosen was the Atmel ATSAMD21G18A-U. The board comes with all the basic circuitry like caps for power pins and crystal. (32.768khz) which gets bumped up via PLL to 48MHz."

The "-C" suffix offers a clue at connectivity: A USB Type-C connector used for both programming and power, with a 500mA resettable fuse for protection. There's a single user-addressable button, another user-addressable LED, and pin headers for the general-purpose input/output (GPIO) pins on each side — plus ground and VIN along both edges, plus a 3.3V pin on the left-hand side.

The Port-A-Proggy, meanwhile, is a very different device. Born from a desire to be able to flash AVR microcontrollers while away from a desktop or laptop, the board includes a 2.7" Sharp Memory LCD panel to the front — a low-power display designed to bridge the gap between low-power ePaper and rapid-response LCD.

The board is driven by an Espressif ESP32-WROVER-E module. "ESP32 is an amazingly fast MCU with dual processors and Bluetooth/Wi-Fi," Lopez explains. "I decided to use the module because it contain everything needed already such as antenna and memory with passives. Makes life simpler.

"There are 2 huge headers that have lock-in housings. I chose these for V2 because it allows for larger wires and less likely for a cable to disconnect when using it in your hand. The header marked ICSP is for programming but can also be used as a UART port. The header marked Target SPI can be used for SPI or I2C or GPIO."

More details on the two designs are available on the AtomSoftTech website. The boards have not yet, however, landed on the company's Tindie store.

Gareth Halfacree
Freelance journalist, technical author, hacker, tinkerer, erstwhile sysadmin. For hire: freelance@halfacree.co.uk.
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